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1800s: y @TheStrangeRoots How programming languages got their names Bash Clojure The creator wanted to include the letter 'c' (C#), 'I (Lisp) and 'j' (Java) and liked that it was a pun on 'closure! The word 'closure, the act of closing, comes from the Latin 'clausūra' stemming from' clauděre' which means 'to shut or close! Bash is an acronym for Bourne-again Shell, a pun on the Bourne Shell - named after creator Stephen Bourne - being "born again". 'Bash' is also a verb meaning 'to strike with a heavy blow', possibly from the Danish 'baske' meaning 'to beat, strike! Quite simply C got its name because it was preceded by a programming language called B.C spawned its own children including C++ and C#.It is the third letter in the English alphabet and was originally identical to the Greek letter 'Gamma', Java Go Elixir The name Java was the result of a highly- caffeinated brainstorming session. Java, or 'Jawa' in Indonesian, is the name of a large island in Indonesia that produces strong, dark and sweet coffee. It has been a slang term for coffee in the United States since the 1800s. One of the Google developers said the name Go, sometime referred to as Golang, was chosen because it was 'short and easy to type' The word 'go, meaning 'to travel or go somewhere' stems from the Old High German 'gan' (to go). The word 'elixir', meaning a potion or essence that prolongs life or preserves something, stems from the Arabic 'al-ikst' via the late Greek 'xerion', a powder for drying wounds. Appeared in Middle English from the 14th century. Java JavaScript Kotlin Perl Originally named Mocha, a type of fine quality coffee, it was later renamed JavaScript, combining Java, US slang for coffee, + 'Script, 'something that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum, 'a set of written words or writing. Inspired by Java, it was named after Kotlin Island in Russia. Originally called Kettusaari by the Finns ('fox island') and Ketlingen by the Swedes, (maybe stemming from 'kettel' meaning 'cauldron'). After Russia won control of the island in 1703 it was Initially named Pearl, the alternative spelling was adopted as the name was already taken. It comes from the Middle French 'perle 'meaning 'bead' or 'something valuable' and the Latin 'perna' meaning 'leg, also a mollusc shaped like a leg of mutton. JS renamed 'Kotling' then 'Kotlin. PHP Python Ris named partly after the first names of the first two R authors (Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman) and partly as a play on the name of S, itss parent langauge. It is the 18th letter in the alphabet and derives from the Greek letter 'Rho' php Originally known as Personal Home Page Construction Kit, this was later shortened to just PHP (an acronym for Personal Home Page). It is now accepted as the initials for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor. Creator Guido van Rossum named Python after TV comedy Monty Python's Flying Circus. The word 'python' comes from the ancient Greek 'Puthón, the name of a huge serpent killed by the god Apollo. Later adopted as a generic term for non- poisonous snakes that constrict their prey. Ruby Scala Rust Influenced by Perl, the developer chose a colleague's birthstone which followed it in the monthly sequence (June is Pearl, Ruby is July). Ruby comes from the Old French 'rubi', a 'reddish precious stone', and the Latin 'rubeus, 'red'. Rust's name comes from a fungus that is robust, distributed, and parallel. It is also a substring of robust. Rust, also the reddish coating formed on oxidized metal, stems from the German 'rost' and possibly the Indo-European base of 'red. Scala is a combination of the first letters of 'scalable' and 'language! It is also the Italian word for 'stairway', as it helps users to ascend to a better language. The logo is also an abstraction of a staircase or steps. SQL Swift TypeScript SQL Originating from the shortcomings of JavaScript, hence the similarility of the name. Its name combines 'Type', meaning a kind or class (from the Greek 'tuptein' 'to strike'), with 'Script, 'something that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum'. First called "Structured English Query Language" (SEQUEL), pronounced "sequel", it was a pun that it was the sequel to QUEL. It was later shortened to SQL. The word 'sequel' stems from the Latin 'sequela' from 'sequr' meaning 'to follow. The word 'swift' means 'moving with great speed or velocity' and can be traced back to the prehistoric 'swipt' meaning to 'move in a sweeping manner'. The swallow-like bird became known as a swift from the 17th century and is used as the language's logo. TS how programming languages got their names
 1800s: y @TheStrangeRoots
 How programming languages got their names
 Bash
 Clojure
 The creator wanted to include the letter 'c' (C#), 'I
 (Lisp) and 'j' (Java) and liked that it was a pun on
 'closure! The word 'closure, the act of closing, comes
 from the Latin 'clausūra' stemming from' clauděre'
 which means 'to shut or close!
 Bash is an acronym for Bourne-again Shell, a pun
 on the Bourne Shell - named after creator Stephen
 Bourne - being "born again". 'Bash' is also a verb
 meaning 'to strike with a heavy blow', possibly from
 the Danish 'baske' meaning 'to beat, strike!
 Quite simply C got its name because it was
 preceded by a programming language called B.C
 spawned its own children including C++ and C#.It
 is the third letter in the English alphabet and was
 originally identical to the Greek letter 'Gamma',
 Java
 Go
 Elixir
 The name Java was the result of a highly-
 caffeinated brainstorming session. Java, or 'Jawa'
 in Indonesian, is the name of a large island in
 Indonesia that produces strong, dark and sweet
 coffee. It has been a slang term for coffee in the
 United States since the 1800s.
 One of the Google developers said the name Go,
 sometime referred to as Golang, was chosen
 because it was 'short and easy to type'
 The word 'go, meaning 'to travel or go somewhere'
 stems from the Old High German 'gan' (to go).
 The word 'elixir', meaning a potion or essence that
 prolongs life or preserves something, stems from
 the Arabic 'al-ikst' via the late Greek 'xerion', a
 powder for drying wounds. Appeared in Middle
 English from the 14th century.
 Java
 JavaScript
 Kotlin
 Perl
 Originally named Mocha, a type of fine quality
 coffee, it was later renamed JavaScript, combining
 Java, US slang for coffee, + 'Script, 'something that
 is written' from the Latin 'scriptum, 'a set of
 written words or writing.
 Inspired by Java, it was named after Kotlin Island
 in Russia. Originally called Kettusaari by the Finns
 ('fox island') and Ketlingen by the Swedes, (maybe
 stemming from 'kettel' meaning 'cauldron'). After
 Russia won control of the island in 1703 it was
 Initially named Pearl, the alternative spelling was
 adopted as the name was already taken. It comes
 from the Middle French 'perle 'meaning 'bead' or
 'something valuable' and the Latin 'perna' meaning
 'leg, also a mollusc shaped like a leg of mutton.
 JS
 renamed 'Kotling' then 'Kotlin.
 PHP
 Python
 Ris named partly after the first names of the first
 two R authors (Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman)
 and partly as a play on the name of S, itss parent
 langauge. It is the 18th letter in the alphabet and
 derives from the Greek letter 'Rho'
 php
 Originally known as Personal Home Page
 Construction Kit, this was later shortened to just
 PHP (an acronym for Personal Home Page). It is
 now accepted as the initials for PHP: Hypertext
 Preprocessor.
 Creator Guido van Rossum named Python after TV
 comedy Monty Python's Flying Circus. The word
 'python' comes from the ancient Greek 'Puthón,
 the name of a huge serpent killed by the god
 Apollo. Later adopted as a generic term for non-
 poisonous snakes that constrict their prey.
 Ruby
 Scala
 Rust
 Influenced by Perl, the developer chose a
 colleague's birthstone which followed it in the
 monthly sequence (June is Pearl, Ruby is July).
 Ruby comes from the Old French 'rubi', a 'reddish
 precious stone', and the Latin 'rubeus, 'red'.
 Rust's name comes from a fungus that is robust,
 distributed, and parallel. It is also a substring of
 robust. Rust, also the reddish coating formed on
 oxidized metal, stems from the German 'rost' and
 possibly the Indo-European base of 'red.
 Scala is a combination of the first letters of
 'scalable' and 'language! It is also the Italian word
 for 'stairway', as it helps users to ascend to a
 better language. The logo is also an abstraction of
 a staircase or steps.
 SQL
 Swift
 TypeScript
 SQL
 Originating from the shortcomings of JavaScript,
 hence the similarility of the name. Its name
 combines 'Type', meaning a kind or class (from the
 Greek 'tuptein' 'to strike'), with 'Script, 'something
 that is written' from the Latin 'scriptum'.
 First called "Structured English Query Language"
 (SEQUEL), pronounced "sequel", it was a pun that it
 was the sequel to QUEL. It was later shortened to
 SQL. The word 'sequel' stems from the Latin
 'sequela' from 'sequr' meaning 'to follow.
 The word 'swift' means 'moving with great speed or
 velocity' and can be traced back to the prehistoric
 'swipt' meaning to 'move in a sweeping manner'. The
 swallow-like bird became known as a swift from the
 17th century and is used as the language's logo.
 TS
how programming languages got their names

how programming languages got their names

1800s: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h maooo000 Judy Harris Yesterday at 5:04 PM. 0+ Why the zoo charge us to look at animals they stole? this ain't even yall shit Sharon @MySharona1987 Replying to @thefathippy To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas screw. 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018 mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time. It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation. Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man. The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful. They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos. In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation.  Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild. I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much. This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.
 1800s: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h
 maooo000
 Judy Harris
 Yesterday at 5:04 PM.
 0+
 Why the zoo charge us to
 look at animals they stole?
 this ain't even yall shit
 Sharon
 @MySharona1987
 Replying to @thefathippy
 To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas
 screw.
 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018
mysharona1987:

little-butch-crouton:
severelynerdysheep:

somehavegonemissing:

spookyboyfelix:

princess-nakamoto:


mysharona1987:


No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time.
It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation.


Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man.


The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive

Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful.  They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. 

So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos.
In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation. 
Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild.


I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much.

This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.

mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: N...

1800s: eutopianext: khaaaaaaaaaan: the-tarot-cafe: She is singing an ancient herding song from mid-north Sweden and Norway. I sense very old vibrations in the calling tones. See what happens to the cows as the singing calls.The singer is Jonna Jinton. Ohohoh, but we have SO MANY of these old songs and tunes (called “kulokk” in Norwegian). Some with lyrics, some without. Some with straight up talking and almost shouting inbetween the most enchanting melodies. They’re using every bit of their voice range to create these tunes, and it’s all based on a wonderful traditional Scaninavian way of singing (that can be a lot more characteristic than in this video, but this is beautiful as well!). In Norway up to the 1800s these amazing women (and only women) spent their summers, often all alone, in the Norwegian mountains to herd and milk cows, and let the animals roam freely. To attract them they would make up these wonderful tunes, and there is even folklore that connects these women to the huldra, which is a Scandinavian forest/mountain siren. She takes the form of a beautiful woman, often portrayed in traditional dresses that partly cover up her animal tail (in Norway a cow’s tail, in Sweden a fox’ tail) that would give away her true nature if anyone saw it. So, the tunes and their effect on animals, combined with these strong women in the beautiful landscape was just too much for people to handle, so people started fantasizing about women like these being straight up supernatural. American version no one asked for: a farmer in Kansas with a trombone.
 1800s: eutopianext:

khaaaaaaaaaan:

the-tarot-cafe:


She is singing an ancient herding song from mid-north Sweden and Norway. I sense very old vibrations in the calling tones. See what happens to the cows as the singing calls.The singer is Jonna Jinton.


Ohohoh, but we have SO MANY of these old songs and tunes (called “kulokk” in Norwegian). Some with lyrics, some without. Some with straight up talking and almost shouting inbetween the most enchanting melodies. They’re using every bit of their voice range to create these tunes, and it’s all based on a wonderful traditional Scaninavian way of singing (that can be a lot more characteristic than in this video, but this is beautiful as well!). 
In Norway up to the 1800s these amazing women (and only women) spent their summers, often all alone, in the Norwegian mountains to herd and milk cows, and let the animals roam freely. To attract them they would make up these wonderful tunes, and there is even folklore that connects these women to the huldra, which is a Scandinavian forest/mountain siren. She takes the form of a beautiful woman, often portrayed in traditional dresses that partly cover up her animal tail (in Norway a cow’s tail, in Sweden a fox’ tail) that would give away her true nature if anyone saw it. 
So, the tunes and their effect on animals, combined with these strong women in the beautiful landscape was just too much for people to handle, so people started fantasizing about women like these being straight up supernatural.

American version no one asked for: a farmer
 in Kansas

 with a trombone.

eutopianext: khaaaaaaaaaan: the-tarot-cafe: She is singing an ancient herding song from mid-north Sweden and Norway. I sense very old...