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Being Alone, Life, and Memes: "Until we heal the root cause of our suffering and awaken to our true nature, our inherent confusion will continue to manifest itself in the world around us." -Joseph P. Kauffman KOO Via @conscious_collective - "Because we feel ourselves to be separate from the world in which we live, we have also grown to feel quite alone in this world. Our sense of loneliness and isolation not only makes us feel depressed and miserable, but it also causes us to be anxious and afraid of the world and everyone in it. Because of this inherent fear, we put up all kinds of barriers to protect us from the world—barriers that we have created to keep us safe, but that really end up making us feel more alone, more miserable, and more afraid, as they prevent us from being our natural selves. • We have become disconnected from our true selves, and naturally, this has produced a deep sense of lack in our lives, causing us to endlessly search for happiness in objects, experiences, and people to fill the emptiness and make us feel whole again. We crave pleasure, material riches, and stimulating experiences—anything that will distract us from this inherent lack of connection. But no matter how hard we try to escape it, eventually the sensation returns. And that is because we are looking for the answer to our freedom in all the wrong places. We are looking for freedom in the world, when the answer to ending our suffering lies within us. Until we heal the root cause of our suffering, and awaken to our true nature, our inherent confusion will continue to manifest itself in the world around us. • It is because we feel that we are separate from nature that we also feel it is okay to manipulate it, pollute it, and cause it harm. We project our inner turmoil onto the planet, causing outer turmoil. Nearly all of the disasters of our time—war, famine, oppression, social injustice, environmental pollution, extinction—arise from this delusional belief that we have an existence independent of the world we live in. All of this misery, all of this destruction, all of this pain and suffering, is caused by our failure to realize that there is no separation and that really we are all one." -A quote from the book "The Answer Is YOU" 💚🌲 @theansweris_you • TheAnswerIsYOU Nature Life Oneness awakespiritual wisdom
Being Alone, Life, and Memes: "Until we heal the root cause of our suffering
 and awaken to our true nature, our inherent confusion
 will continue to manifest itself in the world around us."
 -Joseph P. Kauffman
 KOO
Via @conscious_collective - "Because we feel ourselves to be separate from the world in which we live, we have also grown to feel quite alone in this world. Our sense of loneliness and isolation not only makes us feel depressed and miserable, but it also causes us to be anxious and afraid of the world and everyone in it. Because of this inherent fear, we put up all kinds of barriers to protect us from the world—barriers that we have created to keep us safe, but that really end up making us feel more alone, more miserable, and more afraid, as they prevent us from being our natural selves. • We have become disconnected from our true selves, and naturally, this has produced a deep sense of lack in our lives, causing us to endlessly search for happiness in objects, experiences, and people to fill the emptiness and make us feel whole again. We crave pleasure, material riches, and stimulating experiences—anything that will distract us from this inherent lack of connection. But no matter how hard we try to escape it, eventually the sensation returns. And that is because we are looking for the answer to our freedom in all the wrong places. We are looking for freedom in the world, when the answer to ending our suffering lies within us. Until we heal the root cause of our suffering, and awaken to our true nature, our inherent confusion will continue to manifest itself in the world around us. • It is because we feel that we are separate from nature that we also feel it is okay to manipulate it, pollute it, and cause it harm. We project our inner turmoil onto the planet, causing outer turmoil. Nearly all of the disasters of our time—war, famine, oppression, social injustice, environmental pollution, extinction—arise from this delusional belief that we have an existence independent of the world we live in. All of this misery, all of this destruction, all of this pain and suffering, is caused by our failure to realize that there is no separation and that really we are all one." -A quote from the book "The Answer Is YOU" 💚🌲 @theansweris_you • TheAnswerIsYOU Nature Life Oneness awakespiritual wisdom

Via @conscious_collective - "Because we feel ourselves to be separate from the world in which we live, we have also grown to feel quite alon...

Being Alone, Home Alone, and Life: Me: *home alone* hears noise Me WHO'S THERE? l HAVE A BELT AND I'M NOT AFRAID TO HANG MYSELF For those of you who have read my other stories and asked if there was more and received cryptic answers from me, I want to apologize for being dishonest. I said several times in the comments that nothing really happened after “Footsteps,” but that wasn’t true. The events of the following story weren’t locked away in the recesses of my mind; I’ve always remembered them. It wasn’t until I remembered “Balloons” and spoke with my mother about the following events that I realized how intertwined this story was with everything else, but I originally hadn’t really planned on sharing this anyway. My desire to withhold this memory was due mostly to the fact that I don’t think I showed good judgment in it; I also wanted consent from another person to tell it, so as to not misrepresent what transpired. I didn’t expect there to be a lot of interest in my other stories, so I never thought I’d really get pressed for more details, and I would have been happy to keep this to myself for the rest of my life. I haven’t been able to reach the other party, but I would feel disingenuous withholding this story from those who wanted more information now that I’ve spoken with my mother and another connecting line has been drawn. What follows is as accurate a recollection as I could manage. I apologize for the length. I spent the summer before my first year of elementary school learning how to climb trees. There was one particular pine tree right outside my house that seemed almost designed for me. It had branches that were so low I could easily grab them without a boost, and for the first couple days after I first learned how to pull myself up I would just sit on the lowest branch, dangling my feet. The tree was outside our back fence and was easily visible from the kitchen window which was just above the sink. Before too long my mother and I developed a routine where I would go play on the tree when she washed the dishes because she could easily see me while she did other things.
Being Alone, Home Alone, and Life: Me: *home alone* hears noise
 Me
 WHO'S THERE?
 l HAVE A BELT AND I'M NOT
 AFRAID TO HANG MYSELF
For those of you who have read my other stories and asked if there was more and received cryptic answers from me, I want to apologize for being dishonest. I said several times in the comments that nothing really happened after “Footsteps,” but that wasn’t true. The events of the following story weren’t locked away in the recesses of my mind; I’ve always remembered them. It wasn’t until I remembered “Balloons” and spoke with my mother about the following events that I realized how intertwined this story was with everything else, but I originally hadn’t really planned on sharing this anyway. My desire to withhold this memory was due mostly to the fact that I don’t think I showed good judgment in it; I also wanted consent from another person to tell it, so as to not misrepresent what transpired. I didn’t expect there to be a lot of interest in my other stories, so I never thought I’d really get pressed for more details, and I would have been happy to keep this to myself for the rest of my life. I haven’t been able to reach the other party, but I would feel disingenuous withholding this story from those who wanted more information now that I’ve spoken with my mother and another connecting line has been drawn. What follows is as accurate a recollection as I could manage. I apologize for the length. I spent the summer before my first year of elementary school learning how to climb trees. There was one particular pine tree right outside my house that seemed almost designed for me. It had branches that were so low I could easily grab them without a boost, and for the first couple days after I first learned how to pull myself up I would just sit on the lowest branch, dangling my feet. The tree was outside our back fence and was easily visible from the kitchen window which was just above the sink. Before too long my mother and I developed a routine where I would go play on the tree when she washed the dishes because she could easily see me while she did other things.

For those of you who have read my other stories and asked if there was more and received cryptic answers from me, I want to apologize for be...

Confused, Family, and Memes: My father lost his job in Ramadan Read below My father lost his job in Ramadan About five years ago, I pulled into my driveway and saw my father’s car. I immediately knew that something was wrong. He never came home earlier than 5:30 or 6. My father being home at 1:30 on a weekday just didn’t make sense. Confused, I walked inside. “Daddy, how come you’re home so early today?” “I got laid off.” His voice was calm. His response almost nonchalant. Me on the other hand, I was crushed. I rushed to give him a hug, wanting to provide him some sort of comfort and to hide the tears that I couldn’t control. My father, a brilliant computer software engineer, had worked at the same company since before I was born. Almost three decades of the same commute to the same building, working in same cubicle, with the same colleagues. I didn’t understand. I didn’t pry or ask why, afraid I might make things worse. All I could muster was, “Are you okay?” “Alhamdulillah. I don’t have to work during Ramadan.” While I was a mess, worrying about his self-esteem, his feelings, my mother’s reaction, he was in a completely different place. This was my father’s third Ramadan and my fifth. I marveled at his acceptance of the situation. He wasn’t angry, he wasn’t upset. He chose to believe that Allah was the Best of Planners. He chose to see the blessing in the trial. That Ramadan my father and I made the thirty minute drive to and from the masjid every night for isha and taraweeh prayers, returning home after 1AM. This wouldn’t have been possible given his normal work hours and demand. Because he no longer had to work during Ramadan he also had the opportunity to perform itikaaf in our masjid, another goal on his bucketlist that he thought would have to wait until retirement. During those 10 days and nights, my mother and I would cook and bring our Iftar to the masjid. We’d sit downstairs and open our fast together as a family, along with the other individuals who were staying in the masjid. There were many nights that I stayed upstairs in the women’s area after taraweeh. Then after tahujjud, we’d meet downstairs and keep each other company as we ate suhoor. Continued in comment comes below 👇@lawabidingmuslim
Confused, Family, and Memes: My father lost his job in
 Ramadan
 Read below
My father lost his job in Ramadan About five years ago, I pulled into my driveway and saw my father’s car. I immediately knew that something was wrong. He never came home earlier than 5:30 or 6. My father being home at 1:30 on a weekday just didn’t make sense. Confused, I walked inside. “Daddy, how come you’re home so early today?” “I got laid off.” His voice was calm. His response almost nonchalant. Me on the other hand, I was crushed. I rushed to give him a hug, wanting to provide him some sort of comfort and to hide the tears that I couldn’t control. My father, a brilliant computer software engineer, had worked at the same company since before I was born. Almost three decades of the same commute to the same building, working in same cubicle, with the same colleagues. I didn’t understand. I didn’t pry or ask why, afraid I might make things worse. All I could muster was, “Are you okay?” “Alhamdulillah. I don’t have to work during Ramadan.” While I was a mess, worrying about his self-esteem, his feelings, my mother’s reaction, he was in a completely different place. This was my father’s third Ramadan and my fifth. I marveled at his acceptance of the situation. He wasn’t angry, he wasn’t upset. He chose to believe that Allah was the Best of Planners. He chose to see the blessing in the trial. That Ramadan my father and I made the thirty minute drive to and from the masjid every night for isha and taraweeh prayers, returning home after 1AM. This wouldn’t have been possible given his normal work hours and demand. Because he no longer had to work during Ramadan he also had the opportunity to perform itikaaf in our masjid, another goal on his bucketlist that he thought would have to wait until retirement. During those 10 days and nights, my mother and I would cook and bring our Iftar to the masjid. We’d sit downstairs and open our fast together as a family, along with the other individuals who were staying in the masjid. There were many nights that I stayed upstairs in the women’s area after taraweeh. Then after tahujjud, we’d meet downstairs and keep each other company as we ate suhoor. Continued in comment comes below 👇@lawabidingmuslim

My father lost his job in Ramadan About five years ago, I pulled into my driveway and saw my father’s car. I immediately knew that something...