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answering: Only start creating a lore after you already finished half of the series and keep adding stuff a decade after finishing it Steal 90% of your deep lore from real life history and other authors to fill out your world map Create an entire universe with a bloody, theological history with hundreds of characters and dozens of devastating wars, then write a childrens book in it aethelflaedladyofmercia: Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff after the fact. Back in the day, JKR was extremely open about the fact that there was tons of lore behind the scenes she could not address in the books. She couldn’t address it, btw, because it was a known fact in the publishing industry that young adult novels had to top out at like 250, maybe 300 pages because kids didn’t have the attention span for anything longer. And early HP was middle grade, which is the next age category down. She was only able to start addressing deeper lore halfway through the series because that’s how long it took to convince her publishers it wouldn’t scare readers away.(I distinctly remember another, long-established children’s fantasy author dedicating a book to JKR because the success of HP was the reason said author was able to negotiate an extra 100 pages into that novel.)In the mean time, she was in a ton of interviews. She was absolutely the most open author about her worldbuilding. If a fan asked her a question and the answer wasn’t a spoiler, she answered it every time. JKR was famous for this. She was worshipped for it practically. I remember on the early internet boards, when one fan had the chance to meet her in a Q&A we would all pile together and come up with as many questions as possible. Ask what year Beauxbatons was founded. Ask who the ghost of Hufflepuff is. Ask McGonagall’s age. Ask Lily’s maiden name. Were all the Marauders in Gryffindor? Which of Gilderoy Lockheart’s stories were stolen and which were flat out made up?We collected these interviews, we held them as canon, we altered our fanfic to accommodate what she revealed. And then, all of a sudden, that wasn’t what the fans wanted any more. When she finished HP, she said she was done, that she’d move on to other projects. No one wanted any of her non-HP stuff. No one cared. So she came back to build the Fantastic Beasts verse, with exactly the same policy about answering fans that we had welcomed back in the early 2000s.So, like, you don’t have to enjoy what she’s doing. The fan community has changed, and that’s fine. But JKR contributed a lot to the children’s fantasy genre and to the way fandom operated, and we should at least acknowledge that.
 answering: Only start creating a lore after
 you already finished half of the
 series and keep adding stuff a
 decade after finishing it
 Steal 90% of your deep lore from
 real life history and other authors
 to fill out your world map
 Create an entire universe with a
 bloody, theological history with
 hundreds of characters and dozens
 of devastating wars, then write a
 childrens book in it
aethelflaedladyofmercia:

Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff after the fact. Back in the day, JKR was extremely open about the fact that there was tons of lore behind the scenes she could not address in the books. She couldn’t address it, btw, because it was a known fact in the publishing industry that young adult novels had to top out at like 250, maybe 300 pages because kids didn’t have the attention span for anything longer. And early HP was middle grade, which is the next age category down. She was only able to start addressing deeper lore halfway through the series because that’s how long it took to convince her publishers it wouldn’t scare readers away.(I distinctly remember another, long-established children’s fantasy author dedicating a book to JKR because the success of HP was the reason said author was able to negotiate an extra 100 pages into that novel.)In the mean time, she was in a ton of interviews. She was absolutely the most open author about her worldbuilding. If a fan asked her a question and the answer wasn’t a spoiler, she answered it every time. JKR was famous for this. She was worshipped for it practically. I remember on the early internet boards, when one fan had the chance to meet her in a Q&A we would all pile together and come up with as many questions as possible. Ask what year Beauxbatons was founded. Ask who the ghost of Hufflepuff is. Ask McGonagall’s age. Ask Lily’s maiden name. Were all the Marauders in Gryffindor? Which of Gilderoy Lockheart’s stories were stolen and which were flat out made up?We collected these interviews, we held them as canon, we altered our fanfic to accommodate what she revealed. And then, all of a sudden, that wasn’t what the fans wanted any more. When she finished HP, she said she was done, that she’d move on to other projects. No one wanted any of her non-HP stuff. No one cared. So she came back to build the Fantastic Beasts verse, with exactly the same policy about answering fans that we had welcomed back in the early 2000s.So, like, you don’t have to enjoy what she’s doing. The fan community has changed, and that’s fine. But JKR contributed a lot to the children’s fantasy genre and to the way fandom operated, and we should at least acknowledge that.

aethelflaedladyofmercia: Ok like I think people are forgetting something very important about JKR.Namely, she did not make up this stuff...

answering: AHSIEH Should Climate Change Be Taught In School? Schools should teach about Schools should teach that Schools should not teach Don't know climate change and its impacts on our environment, economy and society anything about climate change climate change exists, but not the potential impacts 100% 6% 7% 9% 13% 17% 8% 6% 10% 10% 80% 12% 16% 17% 12% 60% 17% 81% 40% 74% 68% 66% 49% 20% 0% Overall Teachers Parents Democrats Republicans Source: NPR/lpsos polls of 1,007 U.S. adults conducted March 21-22 and 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 3.5 percentage points; parents, 7.3 percentage points; and teachers, 5.0 percentage points. Totals may not add up to 100 percent because of rounding. npr Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR Teachers Who Cover Climate Change Differ From Those Who Don't Teach climate change All teachers Don't teach climate change Overall: 71% I feel comfortable answering students' questions about climate change 91% 56% Overall: 52% There should be state laws in place that require teaching climate change 38% 70% Thave the resources I need to answer students' questions about climate change Overall: 51% 77% 32% Overall: 41% My students have brought up climate change in the classroom this year 14% 78% My school or school district encourages us to discuss climate change in the Overall: 37% classroom 64% 18% Overall: 29% I worry about parent complaints when it comes to teaching climate change 29% 30% Overall: 21% I would be personally uncomfortable if I had to teach about climate change 15% 27% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Source: NPR/Ipsos polls of 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 5 percentage points. npr Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR npr: More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school. A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught. These polls are among the first to gauge public and teacher opinion on how climate change should be taught to the generation that in the coming years will face its intensifying consequences: children. And yet, as millions of students around the globe participate in Earth Day events on Monday, our poll also found a disconnect. Although most states have classroom standards that at least mention human-caused climate change, most teachers aren’t actually talking about climate change in their classrooms. And fewer than half of parents have discussed the issue with their children. Most Teachers Don’t Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPRCharts: Alyson Hurt/NPR
 answering: AHSIEH

 Should Climate Change Be Taught In School?
 Schools should teach about
 Schools should teach that
 Schools should not teach
 Don't know
 climate change and its impacts
 on our environment, economy
 and society
 anything about climate change
 climate change exists, but not
 the potential impacts
 100%
 6%
 7%
 9%
 13%
 17%
 8%
 6%
 10%
 10%
 80%
 12%
 16%
 17%
 12%
 60%
 17%
 81%
 40%
 74%
 68%
 66%
 49%
 20%
 0%
 Overall
 Teachers
 Parents
 Democrats
 Republicans
 Source: NPR/lpsos polls of 1,007 U.S. adults conducted March 21-22 and 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall
 sample is 3.5 percentage points; parents, 7.3 percentage points; and teachers, 5.0 percentage points. Totals may not add up to 100 percent because
 of rounding.
 npr
 Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

 Teachers Who Cover Climate Change Differ From Those Who Don't
 Teach climate change
 All teachers
 Don't teach climate change
 Overall: 71%
 I feel comfortable answering students'
 questions about climate change
 91%
 56%
 Overall: 52%
 There should be state laws in place that
 require teaching climate change
 38%
 70%
 Thave the resources I need to answer
 students' questions about
 climate change
 Overall: 51%
 77%
 32%
 Overall: 41%
 My students have brought up climate
 change in the classroom this year
 14%
 78%
 My school or school district encourages
 us to discuss climate change in the
 Overall: 37%
 classroom
 64%
 18%
 Overall: 29%
 I worry about parent complaints when it
 comes to teaching climate change
 29% 30%
 Overall: 21%
 I would be personally uncomfortable if I
 had to teach about climate change
 15%
 27%
 0%
 25%
 50%
 75%
 100%
 Source: NPR/Ipsos polls of 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 5 percentage points.
 npr
 Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR
npr:
More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school.
A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught.
These polls are among the first to gauge public and teacher opinion on how climate change should be taught to the generation that in the coming years will face its intensifying consequences: children.
And yet, as millions of students around the globe participate in Earth Day events on Monday, our poll also found a disconnect. Although most states have classroom standards that at least mention human-caused climate change, most teachers aren’t actually talking about climate change in their classrooms. And fewer than half of parents have discussed the issue with their children.
Most Teachers Don’t Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did
Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPRCharts: Alyson Hurt/NPR

npr: More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according t...