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Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet- onius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu, Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,' but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import- ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that has often been overlooked'. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's putative last words were not 'the emotion- al parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son' but more along the lines of See you in hell, punk. pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.] Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.” [End description.]
Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet-
 onius adds that, according to some reports,
 he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which
 Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu,
 Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,'
 but what Caesar may have intended by the
 words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import-
 ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that
 has often been overlooked'. Russell points
 out that the words kai su often appear on
 curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's
 putative last words were not 'the emotion-
 al parting declaration of a betrayed man to
 one he had treated like a son' but more
 along the lines of See you in hell, punk.
pomrania:
narramin:
what a fucking power move
[Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.]
Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.”
[End description.]

pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcrip...

Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet- onius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu, Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,' but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import- ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that has often been overlooked'. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's putative last words were not 'the emotion- al parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son' but more along the lines of See you in hell, punk. pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.] Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.” [End description.]
Fall, Fucking, and Shakespeare: with his toga and let himself fall.' Suet-
 onius adds that, according to some reports,
 he said in Greek: 'Kai su, teknon' (which
 Shakespeare turned into the Latin Et tu,
 Brute?). It literally means 'You too, child,'
 but what Caesar may have intended by the
 words isn't clear. Tempest cites 'an import-
 ant article' by James Russell (1980) 'that
 has often been overlooked'. Russell points
 out that the words kai su often appear on
 curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar's
 putative last words were not 'the emotion-
 al parting declaration of a betrayed man to
 one he had treated like a son' but more
 along the lines of See you in hell, punk.
pomrania:

narramin:
what a fucking power move
[Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcription follows.]
Suetonius adds that, according to some reports, he said in Greek: “Kai su, teknon” (which Shakespeare turned into the Latin “Et tu Brute?”). It literally means “You too, child,” but what Caesar may have intended by the words isn’t clear. Tempest cites “an important article” by James Russell (1980) “that has often been overlooked”. Russell points out that the words kai su often appear on curse tablets, and suggests that Caesar’s putative last words were not “the emotional parting declaration of a betrayed man to one he had treated like a son” but more along the lines of “See you in hell, punk.”
[End description.]

pomrania: narramin: what a fucking power move [Image description: photo of some text (source not given) about Caesar’s last words. Transcri...

Children, Destiny, and God: I dig this for a couple of reasons. First, it's got great style. Perhaps more interestingly though, is that it's a very different tone as far as the direction of aggression. Most people know the Clash of the Titans version where she's on the hunt for him once he shows up. But let's face it, Medusa really gets the shaft from destiny overal She starts out as a priestess in a temple who gets raped by Poseidon and gets cursed for it as if it was all her fault. The result is that she's basically doomed to live without human contact for eternity. Then she's hunted down specifically for her head by a demigod whose got all sorts of great toys and backing to get the job done and depicted as some sort of horrible monster for defending her turf from folks out to kill her There are some really interesting theories about regarding just what the whole 'gorgon thing was really about from a historical perspective. It's really quite a tragic tale about the rise of patriarchy and the purge of goddess-centric worshipers. There are also parallels to the Apollo versus Typhon story which is part of the same0 era. Harsh. See, even the demystified stories from ancient times are fascinating! deviantart Medusa by "MattRhodes Reblogging for commentary I wish there were more nuanced portrayals of Medusa than as just a scary. snake lady Not to mention all this shit went down while she was pregnant with twins, the Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor, as a result from the rape Perseus would mount Pegasus, and use him and Medusa's head to kill a sea monster, thus winning him a wife, Andromeda. Medusa was cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and aide her killers and betrayers. And she's supposed to be the monster? ei That's hoW Greek men saw the myth. Greek women viewed it as Athena protecting Medusa by giving her the power to make any man who looked at her completely harmless. Her head was used as a symbol to mark women's shelters in ancient Greece. 。 Friendly reminder to remember that women have their own vivid lives and cultures and that the stories which are preserved today come through a heavy filter of gender, race, and class biases VIA THEMETAPICTURE.COM srsfunny:I Dig This For A Couple Of Reasons
Children, Destiny, and God: I dig this for a couple of reasons.
 First, it's got great style.
 Perhaps more interestingly though, is that it's a very
 different tone as far as the direction of aggression. Most
 people know the Clash of the Titans version where
 she's on the hunt for him once he shows up. But let's
 face it, Medusa really gets the shaft from destiny overal
 She starts out as a priestess in a temple who gets raped
 by Poseidon and gets cursed for it as if it was all her
 fault. The result is that she's basically doomed to live
 without human contact for eternity. Then she's hunted
 down specifically for her head by a demigod whose got
 all sorts of great toys and backing to get the job done
 and depicted as some sort of horrible monster for
 defending her turf from folks out to kill her
 There are some really interesting theories about
 regarding just what the whole 'gorgon thing was really
 about from a historical perspective. It's really quite a
 tragic tale about the rise of patriarchy and the purge of
 goddess-centric worshipers. There are also parallels to
 the Apollo versus Typhon story which is part of the same0
 era. Harsh.
 See, even the demystified stories from ancient times are
 fascinating!
 deviantart
 Medusa by "MattRhodes
 Reblogging for commentary
 I wish there were more nuanced portrayals of Medusa than as
 just a scary. snake lady
 Not to mention all this shit went down while she was pregnant with
 twins, the Pegasus and the giant Chrysaor, as a result from the rape
 Perseus would mount Pegasus, and use him and Medusa's head to
 kill a sea monster, thus winning him a wife, Andromeda. Medusa was
 cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave
 Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by
 her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was
 pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and
 aide her killers and betrayers. And she's supposed to be the monster?
 ei
 That's hoW Greek men saw the myth. Greek women viewed it as
 Athena protecting Medusa by giving her the power to make any
 man who looked at her completely harmless. Her head was used as
 a symbol to mark women's shelters in ancient Greece.
 。
 Friendly reminder to remember that women have their own vivid lives and
 cultures and that the stories which are preserved today come through a
 heavy filter of gender, race, and class biases
 VIA THEMETAPICTURE.COM
srsfunny:I Dig This For A Couple Of Reasons

srsfunny:I Dig This For A Couple Of Reasons

Fake, Funny, and True: blackcatkin: catbountry: lolfactory: My cat thought she was going to have fun time in the bucket funny tumblr[via imgur] bETRAYED
nsfw
Fake, Funny, and True: blackcatkin:
catbountry:

lolfactory:

My cat thought she was going to have fun time in the bucket
funny tumblr[via imgur]







bETRAYED

blackcatkin: catbountry: lolfactory: My cat thought she was going to have fun time in the bucket funny tumblr[via imgur] bETRAYED