🔥 | Latest

Black Friends: kayla renee Follow @kaybaeparker Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage me. Then I wrote about it RETWEETS LIKES 682 1,368 Imani Gandy e @AngryBlackLady Follow Dear white people: Allyship is more than wearing a safety pin or tweeting Black Lives Matter. If you read one thing today, make it this. kayla renee @kaybaeparker Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage me. Then I wrote about it medium.com/@kaybaeparker/ RETWEETS LIKES 719 1,303 princessnijireiki: corvussy: saturnineaqua: ghettablasta: Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist teacher who appeared to be a wolf in sheep’s clothing. “She wears a safety pin so everyone knows she’s an ally for minorities. Her cover photo has a Black power fist. She regularly discusses her love for the Obamas, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and her admonishment for this current administration.” However, it wasn’t enough to hide her racism.  It all started with a simple question from a test. The question stated,  “Historical research on African-American families during slavery shows that: A) Family ties weren’t important in African cultures where the slaves ancestors originated; consequently, family bonds were never strong among slaves. B) Two-parent families were extremely rare during the slave period. C) Black family bonds were destroyed by the abuses of slave owners, who regularly sold off family members to other slave owners. D) Most slave families were headed by two parents. So, obviously, Kayla chose C. And it was incorrect. According to the teacher, the right answer was D. The argument started when Kayla wrote her an email and respectfully provided the professor the evidence, even directly from their textbook. “However, my Professor continued to argue that family bonds were not destroyed and that 2/3 of slave families were headed by two parents.” The teacher cited Herbert Gutman, sociologist, who died in 1985 and surely took part in the whitewashing of Black history. When they met to discuss the subject in person the professor gave Kayla books to read adding such statements as, “This book would be good for you to read. I believe it’s $6 so I could buy it for you if you’d like.” The stated that she spent her whole life fighting for minorities and something like “I’ve got Black friends.”  When the girl was proving her opinion, she heard more comments as, “You’re talking to someone who has spent their entire life fighting for people of diversity and marched with my Black brothers and sisters.” As the result, the teacher asked Kayla to lecture the class on the topic and that was her fatal mistake. Kayla took all her courage and made a presentation on the topic she was passionate about. She defended Black people and Black history. Here’s her presentation. That was the point where the story should end, but NO. The professor obviously forgot about privacy settings on Facebook and posted offensive comments about Kayla. The professor’s last words to Kayla were: This time The University of Tennessee stood up for the student. In July the teacher officially retiring from the university. This is fucking insane. The last paragraph of kaya’s story is everything: To my Professor, I forgive you for robbing me of my focus last semester. I forgive you for calling my Father, a graduate of Yale Medical School, “educationally challenged.” I even forgive you for threatening me. However, I do not forgive you for being willfully ignorant to the subjects you teach students. I also do not forgive you for claiming to be an ally. An ally is so much more than wearing a safety pin. It also requires that you listen to the needs of Black people and respect the issues that we raise. When a Black student raises a concern over the way you are portraying her history, referring to all you’ve done for Black people doesn’t change the fact that you’re portraying slavery as some kind of slavery lite. As an educator and as an ally, you are not expected to know everything but this does not abdicate you from the responsibility of always continuing to learn- even from your students. Additionally, if you wanted to actually help Black men and women, you’d value our words. Unfortunately, your actions simply mirror how America values Black people in today’s society. This Black girl is a hero who overcame her fear and faced her teacher defending Black people and Black history.  #StayWoke #BlackPride #StopRacists this is why…white women…cant teach black people, or people of color as a whole. White supremacy has a long history of setting up white women to destroy people of color namely black and native people) via education.  I was going through my old likes and decided to see if there was any updates in this story. The professor was arrested for assaulting Kayla in a grocery store but the charges were dismissed by a judge on the condition Morelock has no further contact with Kayla I couldn’t find any more recent news on Kayla than what was said in the second link, but I sincerely hope she wasn’t in any way negatively impacted because of the situation with Morelock, especially since the second link says there were multiple other faculty members that defended Morelock… this is why I do not and never will like white educators. Morelock also continues to post about Kayla on her public Facebook, but (probably for ongoing legal reasons) still can’t or won’t name her directly. You can’t underestimate people’s hatefulness & the depth of their vindictive and petty fixations out here— even & especially people in a position of power over you with the potential to harm you, “ally” or no. And Kayla seems to be doing well! Her FB page says she became a Director at Amnesty International, and has just moved forward to become a Canvass Director for Care.org. Folks will try to block your blessings and drag you down to their hater-ass level in the mud, but you gotta fight & keep on shining. ☀️
Black Friends: kayla renee
 Follow
 @kaybaeparker
 Long story short, I got my racist Professor
 fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage
 me. Then I wrote about it

 RETWEETS LIKES
 682
 1,368

 Imani Gandy e
 @AngryBlackLady
 Follow
 Dear white people: Allyship is more than
 wearing a safety pin or tweeting Black Lives
 Matter.
 If you read one thing today, make it this.
 kayla renee @kaybaeparker
 Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to
 sabotage me. Then I wrote about it medium.com/@kaybaeparker/
 RETWEETS LIKES
 719
 1,303
princessnijireiki:

corvussy:

saturnineaqua:

ghettablasta:

Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist teacher who appeared to be a wolf in sheep’s clothing.


“She wears a safety pin so everyone knows she’s an ally for minorities. Her cover photo has a Black power fist. She regularly discusses her love for the Obamas, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and her admonishment for this current administration.”


However, it wasn’t enough to hide her racism. 
It all started with a simple question from a test. The question stated, 
“Historical research on African-American families during slavery shows that: A) Family ties weren’t important in African cultures where the slaves ancestors originated; consequently, family bonds were never strong among slaves. B) Two-parent families were extremely rare during the slave period. C) Black family bonds were destroyed by the abuses of slave owners, who regularly sold off family members to other slave owners. D) Most slave families were headed by two parents.


So, obviously, Kayla chose C. And it was incorrect. According to the teacher, the right answer was D.
The argument started when Kayla wrote her an email and respectfully provided the professor the evidence, even directly from their textbook. “However, my Professor continued to argue that family bonds were not destroyed and that 2/3 of slave families were headed by two parents.” The teacher cited Herbert Gutman, sociologist, who died in 1985 and surely took part in the whitewashing of Black history.
When they met to discuss the subject in person the professor gave Kayla books to read adding such statements as, “This book would be good for you to read. I believe it’s $6 so I could buy it for you if you’d like.” The stated that she spent her whole life fighting for minorities and something like “I’ve got Black friends.” 
When the girl was proving her opinion, she heard more comments as, “You’re talking to someone who has spent their entire life fighting for people of diversity and marched with my Black brothers and sisters.”


As the result, the teacher asked Kayla to lecture the class on the topic and that was her fatal mistake.
Kayla took all her courage and made a presentation on the topic she was passionate about. She defended Black people and Black history. Here’s her presentation.
That was the point where the story should end, but NO.
The professor obviously forgot about privacy settings on Facebook and posted offensive comments about Kayla.
The professor’s last words to Kayla were:
This time The University of Tennessee stood up for the student. In July the teacher officially retiring from the university.
This is fucking insane.
The last paragraph of kaya’s story is everything:


To my Professor, I forgive you for robbing me of my focus last semester. I forgive you for calling my Father, a graduate of Yale Medical School, “educationally challenged.” I even forgive you for threatening me. However, I do not forgive you for being willfully ignorant to the subjects you teach students. I also do not forgive you for claiming to be an ally. An ally is so much more than wearing a safety pin. It also requires that you listen to the needs of Black people and respect the issues that we raise. When a Black student raises a concern over the way you are portraying her history, referring to all you’ve done for Black people doesn’t change the fact that you’re portraying slavery as some kind of slavery lite. As an educator and as an ally, you are not expected to know everything but this does not abdicate you from the responsibility of always continuing to learn- even from your students. Additionally, if you wanted to actually help Black men and women, you’d value our words. Unfortunately, your actions simply mirror how America values Black people in today’s society.


This Black girl is a hero who overcame her fear and faced her teacher defending Black people and Black history. 
#StayWoke #BlackPride #StopRacists

this is why…white women…cant teach black people, or people of color as a whole. White supremacy has a long history of setting up white women to destroy people of color namely black and native people) via education. 

I was going through my old likes and decided to see if there was any updates in this story.

The professor was arrested for assaulting Kayla in a grocery store but the charges were dismissed by a judge on the condition Morelock has no further contact with Kayla

I couldn’t find any more recent news on Kayla than what was said in the second link, but I sincerely hope she wasn’t in any way negatively impacted because of the situation with Morelock, especially since the second link says there were multiple other faculty members that defended Morelock…
this is why I do not and never will like white educators.

Morelock also continues to post about Kayla on her public Facebook, but (probably for ongoing legal reasons) still can’t or won’t name her directly. You can’t underestimate people’s hatefulness & the depth of their vindictive and petty fixations out here— even & especially people in a position of power over you with the potential to harm you, “ally” or no.
And Kayla seems to be doing well! Her FB page says she became a Director at Amnesty International, and has just moved forward to become a Canvass Director for Care.org. Folks will try to block your blessings and drag you down to their hater-ass level in the mud, but you gotta fight & keep on shining. ☀️

princessnijireiki: corvussy: saturnineaqua: ghettablasta: Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist...

Black Friends: kayla renee Follow @kaybaeparker Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage me. Then I wrote about it RETWEETS LIKES 682 1,368 Imani Gandy e @AngryBlackLady Follow Dear white people: Allyship is more than wearing a safety pin or tweeting Black Lives Matter. If you read one thing today, make it this. kayla renee @kaybaeparker Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage me. Then I wrote about it medium.com/@kaybaeparker/ RETWEETS LIKES 719 1,303 princessnijireiki: corvussy: saturnineaqua: ghettablasta: Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist teacher who appeared to be a wolf in sheep’s clothing. “She wears a safety pin so everyone knows she’s an ally for minorities. Her cover photo has a Black power fist. She regularly discusses her love for the Obamas, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and her admonishment for this current administration.” However, it wasn’t enough to hide her racism.  It all started with a simple question from a test. The question stated,  “Historical research on African-American families during slavery shows that: A) Family ties weren’t important in African cultures where the slaves ancestors originated; consequently, family bonds were never strong among slaves. B) Two-parent families were extremely rare during the slave period. C) Black family bonds were destroyed by the abuses of slave owners, who regularly sold off family members to other slave owners. D) Most slave families were headed by two parents. So, obviously, Kayla chose C. And it was incorrect. According to the teacher, the right answer was D. The argument started when Kayla wrote her an email and respectfully provided the professor the evidence, even directly from their textbook. “However, my Professor continued to argue that family bonds were not destroyed and that 2/3 of slave families were headed by two parents.” The teacher cited Herbert Gutman, sociologist, who died in 1985 and surely took part in the whitewashing of Black history. When they met to discuss the subject in person the professor gave Kayla books to read adding such statements as, “This book would be good for you to read. I believe it’s $6 so I could buy it for you if you’d like.” The stated that she spent her whole life fighting for minorities and something like “I’ve got Black friends.”  When the girl was proving her opinion, she heard more comments as, “You’re talking to someone who has spent their entire life fighting for people of diversity and marched with my Black brothers and sisters.” As the result, the teacher asked Kayla to lecture the class on the topic and that was her fatal mistake. Kayla took all her courage and made a presentation on the topic she was passionate about. She defended Black people and Black history. Here’s her presentation. That was the point where the story should end, but NO. The professor obviously forgot about privacy settings on Facebook and posted offensive comments about Kayla. The professor’s last words to Kayla were: This time The University of Tennessee stood up for the student. In July the teacher officially retiring from the university. This is fucking insane. The last paragraph of kaya’s story is everything: To my Professor, I forgive you for robbing me of my focus last semester. I forgive you for calling my Father, a graduate of Yale Medical School, “educationally challenged.” I even forgive you for threatening me. However, I do not forgive you for being willfully ignorant to the subjects you teach students. I also do not forgive you for claiming to be an ally. An ally is so much more than wearing a safety pin. It also requires that you listen to the needs of Black people and respect the issues that we raise. When a Black student raises a concern over the way you are portraying her history, referring to all you’ve done for Black people doesn’t change the fact that you’re portraying slavery as some kind of slavery lite. As an educator and as an ally, you are not expected to know everything but this does not abdicate you from the responsibility of always continuing to learn- even from your students. Additionally, if you wanted to actually help Black men and women, you’d value our words. Unfortunately, your actions simply mirror how America values Black people in today’s society. This Black girl is a hero who overcame her fear and faced her teacher defending Black people and Black history.  #StayWoke #BlackPride #StopRacists this is why…white women…cant teach black people, or people of color as a whole. White supremacy has a long history of setting up white women to destroy people of color namely black and native people) via education.  I was going through my old likes and decided to see if there was any updates in this story. The professor was arrested for assaulting Kayla in a grocery store but the charges were dismissed by a judge on the condition Morelock has no further contact with Kayla I couldn’t find any more recent news on Kayla than what was said in the second link, but I sincerely hope she wasn’t in any way negatively impacted because of the situation with Morelock, especially since the second link says there were multiple other faculty members that defended Morelock… this is why I do not and never will like white educators. Morelock also continues to post about Kayla on her public Facebook, but (probably for ongoing legal reasons) still can’t or won’t name her directly. You can’t underestimate people’s hatefulness the depth of their vindictive and petty fixations out here— even especially people in a position of power over you with the potential to harm you, “ally” or no. And Kayla seems to be doing well! Her FB page says she became a Director at Amnesty International, and has just moved forward to become a Canvass Director for Care.org. Folks will try to block your blessings and drag you down to their hater-ass level in the mud, but you gotta fight keep on shining. ☀️
Black Friends: kayla renee
 Follow
 @kaybaeparker
 Long story short, I got my racist Professor
 fired mid semester after she tried to sabotage
 me. Then I wrote about it

 RETWEETS LIKES
 682
 1,368

 Imani Gandy e
 @AngryBlackLady
 Follow
 Dear white people: Allyship is more than
 wearing a safety pin or tweeting Black Lives
 Matter.
 If you read one thing today, make it this.
 kayla renee @kaybaeparker
 Long story short, I got my racist Professor fired mid semester after she tried to
 sabotage me. Then I wrote about it medium.com/@kaybaeparker/
 RETWEETS LIKES
 719
 1,303
princessnijireiki:
corvussy:

saturnineaqua:

ghettablasta:

Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist teacher who appeared to be a wolf in sheep’s clothing.


“She wears a safety pin so everyone knows she’s an ally for minorities. Her cover photo has a Black power fist. She regularly discusses her love for the Obamas, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and her admonishment for this current administration.”


However, it wasn’t enough to hide her racism. 
It all started with a simple question from a test. The question stated, 
“Historical research on African-American families during slavery shows that: A) Family ties weren’t important in African cultures where the slaves ancestors originated; consequently, family bonds were never strong among slaves. B) Two-parent families were extremely rare during the slave period. C) Black family bonds were destroyed by the abuses of slave owners, who regularly sold off family members to other slave owners. D) Most slave families were headed by two parents.


So, obviously, Kayla chose C. And it was incorrect. According to the teacher, the right answer was D.
The argument started when Kayla wrote her an email and respectfully provided the professor the evidence, even directly from their textbook. “However, my Professor continued to argue that family bonds were not destroyed and that 2/3 of slave families were headed by two parents.” The teacher cited Herbert Gutman, sociologist, who died in 1985 and surely took part in the whitewashing of Black history.
When they met to discuss the subject in person the professor gave Kayla books to read adding such statements as, “This book would be good for you to read. I believe it’s $6 so I could buy it for you if you’d like.” The stated that she spent her whole life fighting for minorities and something like “I’ve got Black friends.” 
When the girl was proving her opinion, she heard more comments as, “You’re talking to someone who has spent their entire life fighting for people of diversity and marched with my Black brothers and sisters.”


As the result, the teacher asked Kayla to lecture the class on the topic and that was her fatal mistake.
Kayla took all her courage and made a presentation on the topic she was passionate about. She defended Black people and Black history. Here’s her presentation.
That was the point where the story should end, but NO.
The professor obviously forgot about privacy settings on Facebook and posted offensive comments about Kayla.
The professor’s last words to Kayla were:
This time The University of Tennessee stood up for the student. In July the teacher officially retiring from the university.
This is fucking insane.
The last paragraph of kaya’s story is everything:


To my Professor, I forgive you for robbing me of my focus last semester. I forgive you for calling my Father, a graduate of Yale Medical School, “educationally challenged.” I even forgive you for threatening me. However, I do not forgive you for being willfully ignorant to the subjects you teach students. I also do not forgive you for claiming to be an ally. An ally is so much more than wearing a safety pin. It also requires that you listen to the needs of Black people and respect the issues that we raise. When a Black student raises a concern over the way you are portraying her history, referring to all you’ve done for Black people doesn’t change the fact that you’re portraying slavery as some kind of slavery lite. As an educator and as an ally, you are not expected to know everything but this does not abdicate you from the responsibility of always continuing to learn- even from your students. Additionally, if you wanted to actually help Black men and women, you’d value our words. Unfortunately, your actions simply mirror how America values Black people in today’s society.


This Black girl is a hero who overcame her fear and faced her teacher defending Black people and Black history. 
#StayWoke #BlackPride #StopRacists

this is why…white women…cant teach black people, or people of color as a whole. White supremacy has a long history of setting up white women to destroy people of color namely black and native people) via education. 

I was going through my old likes and decided to see if there was any updates in this story.

The professor was arrested for assaulting Kayla in a grocery store but the charges were dismissed by a judge on the condition Morelock has no further contact with Kayla

I couldn’t find any more recent news on Kayla than what was said in the second link, but I sincerely hope she wasn’t in any way negatively impacted because of the situation with Morelock, especially since the second link says there were multiple other faculty members that defended Morelock…
this is why I do not and never will like white educators.

Morelock also continues to post about Kayla on her public Facebook, but (probably for ongoing legal reasons) still can’t or won’t name her directly. You can’t underestimate people’s hatefulness  the depth of their vindictive and petty fixations out here— even  especially people in a position of power over you with the potential to harm you, “ally” or no.
And Kayla seems to be doing well! Her FB page says she became a Director at Amnesty International, and has just moved forward to become a Canvass Director for Care.org. Folks will try to block your blessings and drag you down to their hater-ass level in the mud, but you gotta fight  keep on shining. ☀️

princessnijireiki: corvussy: saturnineaqua: ghettablasta: Kayla Renee Parker shared her story of how she managed to expose her racist...

Black Friends: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p> </blockquote> <p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p> </blockquote> <p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p> <p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ using an outdated term for transgender people is “<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad “<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p> <p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p> <p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p> <p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p> <p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender “<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“ I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity “<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad. “<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“ It’s not going to kill you “<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“ It’s not that hard a concept to understand. “<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote> <p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>
Black Friends: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p>
</blockquote>

<p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p>
<p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
using an outdated term for transgender people is

“<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p>
</blockquote>

<p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p>
<p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p>
<p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p>
<p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p>
<p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender

“<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“
I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity

“<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad.

“<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“
 It’s not going to kill you

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“
It’s not that hard a concept to understand. 

“<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote>

<p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote>

<p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>

<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:...

Black Friends: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
Black Friends: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>

<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his...

Black Friends: OLD NAWY Josh Clark Something has been weighing pretty heavily on me the past few days. I have had a few small discussions on the issue, but haven't gotten too far into it. I wanted to share this, not for attention, but because I thought it needed to be done It's no big secret to my friends that I love to hunt, fish, camp and do pretty much anything outdoors. I have always considered myself to be a country boy stuck in the city. One of the ways that I used to show pride for my lifestyle was wearing t-shirts with the Confederatel Rebel flag on them. In high school, I even had a bumper sticker on my truck that read "Keep It Flying". I had grown up seeing the flag regularly, and although I had seen it used in negative ways on occasion, I chose to accept the "Heritage not Hate" and "Pride not Prejudice" interpretation of the flag. If you had asked me back then, I would've told you that it was a symbol of southern pride and had nothing to do with racism I was raised pretty close to downtown Nashville and grew up with kids of all races with all kinds of backgrounds. I played baseball, basketball and football on teams where sometimes whites were minorities. I am very thankful for this. As I continue to grow and learn, I realize that we tend to fear things just because we don't understand them Because of where and how I was raised, background. I was able to realize that we are all the same underneath. I have had white friends, black friends, Asian friends, Middle Eastern friends, Latino friends, Christian friends, Muslim friends, Atheist friends, etc. Thankfully, I have never had a racist bone in my body I never feared people of other color or It wasn't until well into my college years when I began to start thinking for myself. I no longer let the people I was raised by tell me how to view every issue and tried my best to be more open-minded. I believe that one of the most important things for us to do as humans is to try putting ourselves in others' shoes before we make any kind of judgement. Although I never meant anything racist by sporting the Confederate flag, I couldn't help but think of what some of my black friends thought about it. I really can't think of a time that I was confronted about it. Did it not offend them? Were they too nice or afraid to confront me about it? The more I researched about the history of the flag, the worse I felt. What I had been told about its history was wrong. Thousands of southerners still fly the flag with no racist intent. They still defend the good things they've been told about the flag. They, like I once was, are WRONG. The flag is a symbol of a way of life that was wrong. Not that it needs to be stated, but slavery is one of the most evil and cruel things this world has ever seen. The Confederate flag represents this evil. Where is the pride in that? The Confederate flag is also a sign of division. How can you truly be a patriot of this country and fly this flag? Do we really need to fly a flag to show that we are southern, or that we like to hunt and fish, especially when it's offensive to so many? It is not a kind thing, a good thing, or the right thing to do To those against removing the flag, I do not think you are a bad person. I know what it once meant to me. I do, however, challenge you to do your research. Step outside of what your family taught you and be open-minded. Even if you believe in a different history lesson, is flying a flag worth the pain it causes others? Please try to view these issues from the other side of the argument. To those I may have offended in the past, who never confronted me, I apologize. I was WRONG As our country continues to move forward on equality issues, I believe the only place for the Confederate flag is in our history books mysharona1987: This is great. 👏👏👏 👏
Black Friends: OLD NAWY

 Josh Clark
 Something has been weighing pretty heavily on me the past few days. I have had a few
 small discussions on the issue, but haven't gotten too far into it. I wanted to share this, not
 for attention, but because I thought it needed to be done
 It's no big secret to my friends that I love to hunt, fish, camp and do pretty much anything
 outdoors. I have always considered myself to be a country boy stuck in the city. One of
 the ways that I used to show pride for my lifestyle was wearing t-shirts with the
 Confederatel Rebel flag on them. In high school, I even had a bumper sticker on my truck
 that read "Keep It Flying". I had grown up seeing the flag regularly, and although I had
 seen it used in negative ways on occasion, I chose to accept the "Heritage not Hate" and
 "Pride not Prejudice" interpretation of the flag. If you had asked me back then, I would've
 told you that it was a symbol of southern pride and had nothing to do with racism
 I was raised pretty close to downtown Nashville and grew up with kids of all races with all
 kinds of backgrounds. I played baseball, basketball and football on teams where
 sometimes whites were minorities. I am very thankful for this. As I continue to grow and
 learn, I realize that we tend to fear things just because we don't understand them
 Because of where and how I was raised,
 background. I was able to realize that we are all the same underneath. I have had white
 friends, black friends, Asian friends, Middle Eastern friends, Latino friends, Christian
 friends, Muslim friends, Atheist friends, etc. Thankfully, I have never had a racist bone in
 my body
 I never feared people of other color or
 It wasn't until well into my college years when I began to start thinking for myself. I no
 longer let the people I was raised by tell me how to view every issue and tried my best to
 be more open-minded. I believe that one of the most important things for us to do as
 humans is to try putting ourselves in others' shoes before we make any kind of
 judgement.
 Although I never meant anything racist by sporting the Confederate flag, I couldn't help
 but think of what some of my black friends thought about it. I really can't think of a time
 that I was confronted about it. Did it not offend them? Were they too nice or afraid to
 confront me about it? The more I researched about the history of the flag, the worse I felt.
 What I had been told about its history was wrong. Thousands of southerners still fly the
 flag with no racist intent. They still defend the good things they've been told about the
 flag. They, like I once was, are WRONG. The flag is a symbol of a way of life that was
 wrong. Not that it needs to be stated, but slavery is one of the most evil and cruel things
 this world has ever seen. The Confederate flag represents this evil. Where is the pride in
 that? The Confederate flag is also a sign of division. How can you truly be a patriot of this
 country and fly this flag? Do we really need to fly a flag to show that we are southern, or
 that we like to hunt and fish, especially when it's offensive to so many? It is not a kind
 thing, a good thing, or the right thing to do

 To those against removing the flag, I do not think you are a bad person. I know what it
 once meant to me. I do, however, challenge you to do your research. Step outside of what
 your family taught you and be open-minded. Even if you believe in a different history
 lesson, is flying a flag worth the pain it causes others? Please try to view these issues
 from the other side of the argument.
 To those I may have offended in the past, who never confronted me, I apologize. I was
 WRONG
 As our country continues to move forward on equality issues, I believe the only place for
 the Confederate flag is in our history books
mysharona1987:
This is great.
👏👏👏 👏

mysharona1987: This is great. 👏👏👏 👏

Black Friends: OLD NAWY Josh Clark Something has been weighing pretty heavily on me the past few days. I have had a few small discussions on the issue, but haven't gotten too far into it. I wanted to share this, not for attention, but because I thought it needed to be done It's no big secret to my friends that I love to hunt, fish, camp and do pretty much anything outdoors. I have always considered myself to be a country boy stuck in the city. One of the ways that I used to show pride for my lifestyle was wearing t-shirts with the Confederatel Rebel flag on them. In high school, I even had a bumper sticker on my truck that read "Keep It Flying". I had grown up seeing the flag regularly, and although I had seen it used in negative ways on occasion, I chose to accept the "Heritage not Hate" and "Pride not Prejudice" interpretation of the flag. If you had asked me back then, I would've told you that it was a symbol of southern pride and had nothing to do with racism I was raised pretty close to downtown Nashville and grew up with kids of all races with all kinds of backgrounds. I played baseball, basketball and football on teams where sometimes whites were minorities. I am very thankful for this. As I continue to grow and learn, I realize that we tend to fear things just because we don't understand them Because of where and how I was raised, background. I was able to realize that we are all the same underneath. I have had white friends, black friends, Asian friends, Middle Eastern friends, Latino friends, Christian friends, Muslim friends, Atheist friends, etc. Thankfully, I have never had a racist bone in my body I never feared people of other color or It wasn't until well into my college years when I began to start thinking for myself. I no longer let the people I was raised by tell me how to view every issue and tried my best to be more open-minded. I believe that one of the most important things for us to do as humans is to try putting ourselves in others' shoes before we make any kind of judgement. Although I never meant anything racist by sporting the Confederate flag, I couldn't help but think of what some of my black friends thought about it. I really can't think of a time that I was confronted about it. Did it not offend them? Were they too nice or afraid to confront me about it? The more I researched about the history of the flag, the worse I felt. What I had been told about its history was wrong. Thousands of southerners still fly the flag with no racist intent. They still defend the good things they've been told about the flag. They, like I once was, are WRONG. The flag is a symbol of a way of life that was wrong. Not that it needs to be stated, but slavery is one of the most evil and cruel things this world has ever seen. The Confederate flag represents this evil. Where is the pride in that? The Confederate flag is also a sign of division. How can you truly be a patriot of this country and fly this flag? Do we really need to fly a flag to show that we are southern, or that we like to hunt and fish, especially when it's offensive to so many? It is not a kind thing, a good thing, or the right thing to do To those against removing the flag, I do not think you are a bad person. I know what it once meant to me. I do, however, challenge you to do your research. Step outside of what your family taught you and be open-minded. Even if you believe in a different history lesson, is flying a flag worth the pain it causes others? Please try to view these issues from the other side of the argument. To those I may have offended in the past, who never confronted me, I apologize. I was WRONG As our country continues to move forward on equality issues, I believe the only place for the Confederate flag is in our history books mysharona1987: This is great.
Black Friends: OLD NAWY

 Josh Clark
 Something has been weighing pretty heavily on me the past few days. I have had a few
 small discussions on the issue, but haven't gotten too far into it. I wanted to share this, not
 for attention, but because I thought it needed to be done
 It's no big secret to my friends that I love to hunt, fish, camp and do pretty much anything
 outdoors. I have always considered myself to be a country boy stuck in the city. One of
 the ways that I used to show pride for my lifestyle was wearing t-shirts with the
 Confederatel Rebel flag on them. In high school, I even had a bumper sticker on my truck
 that read "Keep It Flying". I had grown up seeing the flag regularly, and although I had
 seen it used in negative ways on occasion, I chose to accept the "Heritage not Hate" and
 "Pride not Prejudice" interpretation of the flag. If you had asked me back then, I would've
 told you that it was a symbol of southern pride and had nothing to do with racism
 I was raised pretty close to downtown Nashville and grew up with kids of all races with all
 kinds of backgrounds. I played baseball, basketball and football on teams where
 sometimes whites were minorities. I am very thankful for this. As I continue to grow and
 learn, I realize that we tend to fear things just because we don't understand them
 Because of where and how I was raised,
 background. I was able to realize that we are all the same underneath. I have had white
 friends, black friends, Asian friends, Middle Eastern friends, Latino friends, Christian
 friends, Muslim friends, Atheist friends, etc. Thankfully, I have never had a racist bone in
 my body
 I never feared people of other color or
 It wasn't until well into my college years when I began to start thinking for myself. I no
 longer let the people I was raised by tell me how to view every issue and tried my best to
 be more open-minded. I believe that one of the most important things for us to do as
 humans is to try putting ourselves in others' shoes before we make any kind of
 judgement.
 Although I never meant anything racist by sporting the Confederate flag, I couldn't help
 but think of what some of my black friends thought about it. I really can't think of a time
 that I was confronted about it. Did it not offend them? Were they too nice or afraid to
 confront me about it? The more I researched about the history of the flag, the worse I felt.
 What I had been told about its history was wrong. Thousands of southerners still fly the
 flag with no racist intent. They still defend the good things they've been told about the
 flag. They, like I once was, are WRONG. The flag is a symbol of a way of life that was
 wrong. Not that it needs to be stated, but slavery is one of the most evil and cruel things
 this world has ever seen. The Confederate flag represents this evil. Where is the pride in
 that? The Confederate flag is also a sign of division. How can you truly be a patriot of this
 country and fly this flag? Do we really need to fly a flag to show that we are southern, or
 that we like to hunt and fish, especially when it's offensive to so many? It is not a kind
 thing, a good thing, or the right thing to do

 To those against removing the flag, I do not think you are a bad person. I know what it
 once meant to me. I do, however, challenge you to do your research. Step outside of what
 your family taught you and be open-minded. Even if you believe in a different history
 lesson, is flying a flag worth the pain it causes others? Please try to view these issues
 from the other side of the argument.
 To those I may have offended in the past, who never confronted me, I apologize. I was
 WRONG
 As our country continues to move forward on equality issues, I believe the only place for
 the Confederate flag is in our history books
mysharona1987:
This is great.

mysharona1987: This is great.

Black Friends: POLICE DEPT. JA C KSON, MISS 20975 6- 8.SI This is Joan Trumpauer Mulholland. This is her mugshot from when she was arrested in 1961 for protesting segregation. Her family disowned her for her activism. After her first arrest, she was tested for mental illness, because Virginia law enforcement couldn’t think of any other reason why a white Virginian girl would want to fight for civil rights. I've been thinking about history class a lot lately. I think almost every white person I know has at least *thought* that they would have been like Joan. We would have had black friends and marched for civil rights and supported MLK and protected little Ruby Bridges as she walked into an all-white school... And then I think of Philando Castile. And Eric Garner. And Tamir Rice. Mike Brown. Oscar Grant. Alton Sterling. Freddie Gray. Sandra Bland. John Crawford. Jordan Davis. Trayvon Martin. I think of how their families will never see justice because the system was not built to protect them. I think of how white terrorists and rapists are safer in this country than black folks who are just existing. I think of how easily people justify their murders. And I think of how simple it is for me- a white person with more privilege than I'll ever fully understand- to turn off the news, to go for a walk... to just not think about this anymore. My whole point comes down to this: My fellow white people- if you think you would have done something *then*, but are doing nothing *now*, then you wouldn't have done anything *then*, either. So think about what side of history you want to be on, because now's the time for doing something.
Black Friends: POLICE DEPT.
 JA C KSON, MISS
 20975
 6- 8.SI
This is Joan Trumpauer Mulholland. This is her mugshot from when she was arrested in 1961 for protesting segregation. Her family disowned her for her activism. After her first arrest, she was tested for mental illness, because Virginia law enforcement couldn’t think of any other reason why a white Virginian girl would want to fight for civil rights. I've been thinking about history class a lot lately. I think almost every white person I know has at least *thought* that they would have been like Joan. We would have had black friends and marched for civil rights and supported MLK and protected little Ruby Bridges as she walked into an all-white school... And then I think of Philando Castile. And Eric Garner. And Tamir Rice. Mike Brown. Oscar Grant. Alton Sterling. Freddie Gray. Sandra Bland. John Crawford. Jordan Davis. Trayvon Martin. I think of how their families will never see justice because the system was not built to protect them. I think of how white terrorists and rapists are safer in this country than black folks who are just existing. I think of how easily people justify their murders. And I think of how simple it is for me- a white person with more privilege than I'll ever fully understand- to turn off the news, to go for a walk... to just not think about this anymore. My whole point comes down to this: My fellow white people- if you think you would have done something *then*, but are doing nothing *now*, then you wouldn't have done anything *then*, either. So think about what side of history you want to be on, because now's the time for doing something.

This is Joan Trumpauer Mulholland. This is her mugshot from when she was arrested in 1961 for protesting segregation. Her family disowned...

Black Friends: <p><a href="https://threeeyedsloth.tumblr.com/post/160914206232/purplelittlemermaid-dickscentedroses" class="tumblr_blog">threeeyedsloth</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://purplelittlemermaid.tumblr.com/post/160880958118/dickscentedroses-hoeswithclothes" class="tumblr_blog">purplelittlemermaid</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://dickscentedroses.tumblr.com/post/160880812392/hoeswithclothes-clarknokent" class="tumblr_blog">dickscentedroses</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://hoeswithclothes.tumblr.com/post/160877741131/clarknokent-caliphorniaqueen" class="tumblr_blog">hoeswithclothes</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://clarknokent.tumblr.com/post/160863082275" class="tumblr_blog">clarknokent</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://caliphorniaqueen.tumblr.com/post/160860226143" class="tumblr_blog">caliphorniaqueen</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://blackgirlsaregold.tumblr.com/post/160843947143/sasha-obamas-16th-birthday" class="tumblr_blog">blackgirlsaregold</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Sasha obama’s 16th birthday 🎉👸🏽</p></blockquote> <p>I’m glad Sasha has black girlfriends. They not gonna sell her out to the media like Malia’s white friends.</p></blockquote> <p>She learned from her sisters mistakes</p></blockquote> <p>Yes black friends lol</p></blockquote> <p>She looks so happy</p></blockquote> <p>She doooooes!</p></blockquote> <p>Look at all these sad racists.</p></blockquote> <p>Because black people never ever sell their friend&rsquo;s out for money ever that&rsquo;s just something white people do yes sir only white people have any kind of personal flaws or are susceptible to greed not our magic negros though no no not a chance they are all literal deities mmmmhmmm.</p>
Black Friends: <p><a href="https://threeeyedsloth.tumblr.com/post/160914206232/purplelittlemermaid-dickscentedroses" class="tumblr_blog">threeeyedsloth</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://purplelittlemermaid.tumblr.com/post/160880958118/dickscentedroses-hoeswithclothes" class="tumblr_blog">purplelittlemermaid</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://dickscentedroses.tumblr.com/post/160880812392/hoeswithclothes-clarknokent" class="tumblr_blog">dickscentedroses</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://hoeswithclothes.tumblr.com/post/160877741131/clarknokent-caliphorniaqueen" class="tumblr_blog">hoeswithclothes</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://clarknokent.tumblr.com/post/160863082275" class="tumblr_blog">clarknokent</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://caliphorniaqueen.tumblr.com/post/160860226143" class="tumblr_blog">caliphorniaqueen</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://blackgirlsaregold.tumblr.com/post/160843947143/sasha-obamas-16th-birthday" class="tumblr_blog">blackgirlsaregold</a>:</p><blockquote><p>Sasha obama’s 16th birthday 🎉👸🏽</p></blockquote>
<p>I’m glad Sasha has black girlfriends. They not gonna sell her out to the media like Malia’s white friends.</p></blockquote>

<p>She learned from her sisters mistakes</p></blockquote>

<p>Yes black friends lol</p></blockquote>

<p>She looks so happy</p></blockquote>

<p>She doooooes!</p></blockquote>

<p>Look at all these sad racists.</p></blockquote>

<p>Because black people never ever sell their friend&rsquo;s out for money ever that&rsquo;s just something white people do yes sir only white people have any kind of personal flaws or are susceptible to greed not our magic negros though no no not a chance they are all literal deities mmmmhmmm.</p>

<p><a href="https://threeeyedsloth.tumblr.com/post/160914206232/purplelittlemermaid-dickscentedroses" class="tumblr_blog">threeeyedsloth<...

Black Friends: White friends vs Black friends... OneOfMyFavs JustComedy
Black Friends: White friends vs Black friends... OneOfMyFavs JustComedy

White friends vs Black friends... OneOfMyFavs JustComedy