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Black History Month: Happy black history month! by Slade_Sez MORE MEMES
Black History Month: Happy black history month! by Slade_Sez
MORE MEMES

Happy black history month! by Slade_Sez MORE MEMES

Black History Month: Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month
Black History Month: Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month

Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month

Black History Month: Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month by rhinokitty MORE MEMES
Black History Month: Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month by rhinokitty
MORE MEMES

Happy pre- and post-colonial Black History Month by rhinokitty MORE MEMES

Black History Month: <p>Black artist history day 28: Opera singer Camilla Williams.</p> <p>Camilla Williams was born in 1919 to a laundress and a chauffeur. She was the fourth and youngest child of the family. The Williams’ were poor, the music was an important part of their lives. Camilla’s grandfather was a choir leader and she grew up singing and playing piano.</p> <p>She later trained at Virginia State College, now Virginia State University, and received her bachelor&rsquo;s in music education. She was then awarded a scholarship to study music in Philadelphia with a prestigious voice instructor, Marion Szekely Freschl.</p> <p>In 1946 Williams became the first African American to receive a regular contract with a major American opera company, making her debut with the New York City Opera in the title role in Puccini&rsquo;s Madama Butterfly. She continued to sing throughout the United States and Europe with other opera companies and in 1951 she sang Bess in the landmark, first complete recording of Gershwin&rsquo;s Porgy and Bess.</p> <p>In 1977, she became the first African American appointed as Professor of Voice at Indiana University. She was also the first African-American vocal teacher at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, China. </p> <p>I really hope you’ve enjoyed this series on black artists for Black history month. We’ve covered singers, dancers, actors, musicians, painters, sculptors, poets and more :D I’ve had a lot of fun researching for this project and sharing what I’ve discovered with you.</p>
Black History Month: <p>Black artist history day 28: Opera singer Camilla Williams.</p>

<p>Camilla Williams was born in 1919 to a laundress and a chauffeur. She was the fourth and youngest child of the family. The Williams’ were poor, the music was an important part of their lives. Camilla’s grandfather was a choir leader and she grew up singing and playing piano.</p>

<p>She later trained at Virginia State College, now Virginia State University, and received her bachelor&rsquo;s in music education. She was then awarded a scholarship to study music in Philadelphia with a prestigious voice instructor, Marion Szekely Freschl.</p>

<p>In 1946 Williams became the first African American to receive a regular contract with a major American opera company, making her debut with the New York City Opera in the title role in Puccini&rsquo;s Madama Butterfly. She continued to sing throughout the United States and Europe with other opera companies and in 1951 she sang Bess in the landmark, first complete recording of Gershwin&rsquo;s Porgy and Bess.</p>

<p>In 1977, she became the first African American appointed as Professor of Voice at Indiana University. She was also the first African-American vocal teacher at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, China. </p>

<p>I really hope you’ve enjoyed this series on black artists for Black history month. We’ve covered singers, dancers, actors, musicians, painters, sculptors, poets and more :D I’ve had a lot of fun researching for this project and sharing what I’ve discovered with you.</p>

<p>Black artist history day 28: Opera singer Camilla Williams.</p> <p>Camilla Williams was born in 1919 to a laundress and a chauffeur....

Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 19: Dancer Master Juba</p> <p>Master Juba was born around 1825, likely to free blacks in Providence, Rhode Island. He was a minstrel dancer active in the 1840s, and one of the first black performers in the United States to play onstage for white audiences and be a member of a white minstrel group. His real name was believed to be William Henry Lane, and he was also known as &ldquo;Boz&rsquo;s Juba&rdquo; following a description of him by Charles Dickens, who wrote about the dancer in his travelogue “American Notes“.</p> <p>Details of his early life are scant but it is believed that he grew up in a slum that was the home to Irish immigrants and free blacks. The Irish and black communities frequently shared their culture with one another, leading to various dance steps and jigs and musical styles. Many blacks would perform in the local brothels and saloons or on the street corners for change.</p> <p>Eventually Juba was discovered by PT Barnum and Barnum got him into the minstrel business by disguising him as white minstrel by putting him in blackface. At a later date his race became clear but he still often performed in blackface, and was well known as the boy who beat famed white performer Joe Diamond in a dancing contest. At the time black performer being publicly confirmed as better than white man at anything was unheard of.</p> <p>Though Juba had success in the United States, he actually became most popular in England.</p>
Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 19: Dancer Master Juba</p>

<p>Master Juba was born around 1825, likely to free blacks in Providence, Rhode Island. He was a minstrel dancer active in the 1840s, and one of the first black performers in the United States to play onstage for white audiences and be a member of a white minstrel group. His real name was believed to be William Henry Lane, and he was also known as &ldquo;Boz&rsquo;s Juba&rdquo; following a description of him by Charles Dickens, who wrote about the dancer in his travelogue “American Notes“.</p>

<p>Details of his early life are scant but it is believed that he grew up in a slum that was the home to Irish immigrants and free blacks. The Irish and black communities frequently shared their culture with one another, leading to various dance steps and jigs and musical styles. Many blacks would perform in the local brothels and saloons or on the street corners for change.</p>

<p>Eventually Juba was discovered by PT Barnum and Barnum got him into the minstrel business by disguising him as white minstrel by putting him in blackface. At a later date his race became clear but he still often performed in blackface, and was well known as the boy who beat famed white performer Joe Diamond in a dancing contest. At the time black performer being publicly confirmed as better than white man at anything was unheard of.</p>

<p>Though Juba had success in the United States, he actually became most popular in England.</p>

<p>Black history month day 19: Dancer Master Juba</p> <p>Master Juba was born around 1825, likely to free blacks in Providence, Rhode Is...

Black History Month: <p><a href="https://its-a-human-thing.tumblr.com/post/170687265652/celticpyro-judgingeternity" class="tumblr_blog">its-a-human-thing</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://celticpyro.tumblr.com/post/170687218499/judgingeternity-siryouarebeingmocked" class="tumblr_blog">celticpyro</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://judgingeternity.tumblr.com/post/170668724081/siryouarebeingmocked-shieldspatriot" class="tumblr_blog">judgingeternity</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://siryouarebeingmocked.tumblr.com/post/170668243355/shieldspatriot-butts-and-uppercuts-heres" class="tumblr_blog">siryouarebeingmocked</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://shieldspatriot.tumblr.com/post/170435198638/butts-and-uppercuts-heres-the-perfect-2018" class="tumblr_blog">shieldspatriot</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://butts-and-uppercuts.tumblr.com/post/170424632142/heres-the-perfect-2018-black-history-month-image" class="tumblr_blog">butts-and-uppercuts</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Here’s the perfect 2018 Black History Month image: Black Panther slapping the shit out of Tony Stark.</p></blockquote> <p>How about here’s the actual perfect 2018 Black History Month image where T’Challa is being a good friend to Tony and slapped him to snap him out of actual explicit suicide ideation. </p> <p>How about Black History Month where T’Challa refuses to let his friend kill himself and just give up. </p> <p>How about Black History Month where you don’t make a black man violent just violence’s sake and actually take the WHOLE SCENE IN CONTEXT?</p> <figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="782" data-orig-width="506"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4f37b6f65982224dbee60a1b14489adb/tumblr_inline_p3jsg5RLbY1qi6kj7_500.jpg" data-orig-height="782" data-orig-width="506"/></figure></blockquote> <p>In other words, the actual context is even cooler than what OP presented, but OP took it out of context to fuel their anti-white hateboner.</p> </blockquote> <p>Well that doesn’t exactly surprise anyone does it? Hero’s are meant to be someone to aspire to, but by taking his actions out of context it allows op to aspire to being the shit heap he already is versus the paragon that Black Panther is written to be.</p> </blockquote> <p>T’Challa was snapping his friend out of self-destructive behavior and OP took it out of context to make it look like he was hitting him for no reason. Wow.</p> </blockquote> <p>How do you actively make someone look <i>worse</i> and then tell people to look up to that person?<br/></p></blockquote>
Black History Month: <p><a href="https://its-a-human-thing.tumblr.com/post/170687265652/celticpyro-judgingeternity" class="tumblr_blog">its-a-human-thing</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://celticpyro.tumblr.com/post/170687218499/judgingeternity-siryouarebeingmocked" class="tumblr_blog">celticpyro</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="http://judgingeternity.tumblr.com/post/170668724081/siryouarebeingmocked-shieldspatriot" class="tumblr_blog">judgingeternity</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://siryouarebeingmocked.tumblr.com/post/170668243355/shieldspatriot-butts-and-uppercuts-heres" class="tumblr_blog">siryouarebeingmocked</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://shieldspatriot.tumblr.com/post/170435198638/butts-and-uppercuts-heres-the-perfect-2018" class="tumblr_blog">shieldspatriot</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://butts-and-uppercuts.tumblr.com/post/170424632142/heres-the-perfect-2018-black-history-month-image" class="tumblr_blog">butts-and-uppercuts</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Here’s the perfect 2018 Black History Month image: Black Panther slapping the shit out of Tony Stark.</p></blockquote>

<p>How about here’s the actual perfect 2018 Black History Month image where T’Challa is being a good friend to Tony and slapped him to snap him out of actual explicit suicide ideation. </p>
<p>How about Black History Month where T’Challa refuses to let his friend kill himself and just give up. </p>
<p>How about Black History Month where you don’t make a black man violent just violence’s sake and actually take the WHOLE SCENE IN CONTEXT?</p>
<figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="782" data-orig-width="506"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4f37b6f65982224dbee60a1b14489adb/tumblr_inline_p3jsg5RLbY1qi6kj7_500.jpg" data-orig-height="782" data-orig-width="506"/></figure></blockquote>
<p>In other words, the actual context is even cooler than what OP presented, but OP took it out of context to fuel their anti-white hateboner.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Well that doesn’t exactly surprise anyone does it? Hero’s are meant to be someone to aspire to, but by taking his actions out of context it allows op to aspire to being the shit heap he already is versus the paragon that Black Panther is written to be.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>T’Challa was snapping his friend out of self-destructive behavior and OP took it out of context to make it look like he was hitting him for no reason. Wow.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>How do you actively make someone look <i>worse</i> and then tell people to look up to that person?<br/></p></blockquote>

<p><a href="https://its-a-human-thing.tumblr.com/post/170687265652/celticpyro-judgingeternity" class="tumblr_blog">its-a-human-thing</a>:...

Black History Month: <p>Black history month date 13: sculptor Augusta Savage.</p> <p>Augusta Savage was born near Jacksonville Florida on February 29, 1892 to a Baptist minister. She started her interest in sculpting when she was little, making small clay animals, however her father felt this violated the commandment not to create graven images and often punished her for it. Savage never gave up, and when she was in high school the principal encouraged her talent and allowed her to teach a clay modeling class. This began her lifelong commitment to teaching and art.</p> <p>Savage was successful in her growing sculpting career and education, but was turned down from a French sponsored summer art program despite having the best qualifications due to her race. This sparked an ongoing interest in equal rights.</p> <p>As knowledge of Savage’s talent and struggles became widespread in the African-American community, fund-raising parties were held in Harlem and Greenwich Village, and African-American women’s groups and teachers from Florida A&amp;M all sent her money for studies abroad. Later, with assistance as from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, Savage enrolled and attended the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, a leading Paris art school. In Paris, she studied with the sculptor Charles Despiau. She exhibited and won awards in two Salons and one Exposition. She toured France, Belgium, and Germany, researching sculpture in cathedrals and museums.</p>
Black History Month: <p>Black history month date 13: sculptor Augusta Savage.</p>

<p>Augusta Savage was born near Jacksonville Florida on February 29, 1892 to a Baptist minister. She started her interest in sculpting when she was little, making small clay animals, however her father felt this violated the commandment not to create graven images and often punished her for it. Savage never gave up, and when she was in high school the principal encouraged her talent and allowed her to teach a clay modeling class. This began her lifelong commitment to teaching and art.</p>

<p>Savage was successful in her growing sculpting career and education, but was turned down from a French sponsored summer art program despite having the best qualifications due to her race. This sparked an ongoing interest in equal rights.</p>

<p>As knowledge of Savage’s talent and struggles became widespread in the African-American community, fund-raising parties were held in Harlem and Greenwich Village, and African-American women’s groups and teachers from Florida A&amp;M all sent her money for studies abroad. Later, with assistance as from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, Savage enrolled and attended the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, a leading Paris art school. In Paris, she studied with the sculptor Charles Despiau. She exhibited and won awards in two Salons and one Exposition. She toured France, Belgium, and Germany, researching sculpture in cathedrals and museums.</p>

<p>Black history month date 13: sculptor Augusta Savage.</p> <p>Augusta Savage was born near Jacksonville Florida on February 29, 1892 t...

Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin.</p> <p>Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil War in 1868, to a former slave man and freeborn black woman. His father worked as a laborer for the railroad and his mother was a maid. When not working, his father liked to play the violin for plantation parties in North Carolina while his mother sang and played the banjo. Joplin was given a rudimentary musical education by his family and from the age of seven he was allowed to play the piano while his mother cleaned.</p> <p>Joplin was ambitious about learning piano, often practicing after school. He was tutored for a while by German Jew who had emigrated to America. This teacher taught him folk, classical, and opera music, encouraging him to recognize music as an art form. Joplin never forgot the man’s kindness and sent the ill and aging man a gift of money once he had become successful.</p> <p>Jump and did some work as a real way labor but decided to abandon this in pursuit of a musical career. He soon realized that there were not a lot of opportunities for black musicians, churches and brothels being the primary places he could play piano. But he saw some minor success at the Chicago world‘s fair and went on to published several significantly popular ragtime pieces.</p> <p>He composed an opera and move to New York to get it published, unfortunately art music was a field largely closed off the African-Americans. He did not get to see the opera have any success in his lifetime, although it was successfully staged in the 1970s.</p>
Black History Month: <p>Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin.</p>

<p>Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil War in 1868, to a former slave man and freeborn black woman. His father worked as a laborer for the railroad and his mother was a maid. When not working, his father liked to play the violin for plantation parties in North Carolina while his mother sang and played the banjo. Joplin was given a rudimentary musical education by his family and from the age of seven he was allowed to play the piano while his mother cleaned.</p>

<p>Joplin was ambitious about learning piano, often practicing after school. He was tutored for a while by German Jew who had emigrated to America. This teacher taught him folk, classical, and opera music, encouraging him to recognize music as an art form. Joplin never forgot the man’s kindness and sent the ill and aging man a gift of money once he had become successful.</p>

<p>Jump and did some work as a real way labor but decided to abandon this in pursuit of a musical career. He soon realized that there were not a lot of opportunities for black musicians, churches and brothels being the primary places he could play piano. But he saw some minor success at the Chicago world‘s fair and went on to published several significantly popular ragtime pieces.</p>

<p>He composed an opera and move to New York to get it published, unfortunately art music was a field largely closed off the African-Americans. He did not get to see the opera have any success in his lifetime, although it was successfully staged in the 1970s.</p>

<p>Black history month day 11: Ragtime composer Scott Joplin.</p> <p>Stock Joplin was born just three years after the end of the Civil W...