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braid: About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As I'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle with our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful." Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful. This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!
braid: About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As I'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle with
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful."
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful.
This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!

This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!

braid: About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As I'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle with our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful." Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful. This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!
braid: About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As I'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle with
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful."
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful.
This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!

This is a little long but TOTALLY worth the read!

braid: tybalt-tisk Follow About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not' to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle with our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair. It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful" Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful. l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs Cicilia. in your orbit #im still crying 126,404 notes This belongs here
braid: tybalt-tisk Follow
 About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not'
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle with
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But I'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair.
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful"
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful.
 l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs
 Cicilia.
 in your orbit #im still crying
 126,404 notes
This belongs here

This belongs here

braid: tybalt-tisk Follow About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af. Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle witlh our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair. It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful." Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs Cicilia. in your orbit #im still crying 126,404 notes I hope Im posting this in the right subreddit.
braid: tybalt-tisk Follow
 About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af.
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle witlh
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair.
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful."
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful
 l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs
 Cicilia.
 in your orbit #im still crying
 126,404 notes
I hope Im posting this in the right subreddit.

I hope Im posting this in the right subreddit.

braid: tybalt-tisk Follow About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af. Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle witlh our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair. It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful." Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs Cicilia. in your orbit #im still crying 126,404 notes I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)
braid: tybalt-tisk Follow
 About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af.
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle witlh
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair.
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful."
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful
 l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs
 Cicilia.
 in your orbit #im still crying
 126,404 notes
I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)

I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)

braid: tybalt-tisk Follow About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking for my conditioner because today is wash day for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this older white lady approaches me and she says, "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by this." And usually when white people tell me not to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they are about to say is going to be offensive af. Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband and I just recently won our custody battle witlh our foster daughter and she means the world to us. She's a beautiful African American girl and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid because I don't know what to do with her hair. It's a lot different from mines and our other children and we are at a total loss. l've tried looking up the YouTube videos and my husband went to the braiding shops so they can teach him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still pretty new and it will be a while before he gets used to it. Do you have any tips you can give me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I just needed a little advice because I want her to look beautiful." Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking to her and what products to use and how to properly detangle and comb her hair with the proper tools and what not to do with natural hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol- low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube account for her so she could save it for later.) but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that she listened to every single thing I had to say and she took little notes on her little notepad. And what really filled my heart was the fact that her husband actually taking classes from African braiding shops. And she showed me a picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful black women showing him how to braid black hair and even the lady he's braiding on is guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old white people and their black daughter who l know have new loving parents because they are willing to step out of their comfort zone just to make her feel and look beautiful l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs Cicilia. in your orbit #im still crying 126,404 notes I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub by VeeAyeKaye MORE MEMES
braid: tybalt-tisk Follow
 About an hour ago, I was in Walmart looking
 for my conditioner because today is wash day
 for my hair. As l'm looking for my product, this
 older white lady approaches me and she says,
 "Excuse me, miss. Please don't be offended by
 this." And usually when white people tell me not
 to be offended, 9 times out of 10, whatever they
 are about to say is going to be offensive af.
 Anyway, she follows it up with, "My husband
 and I just recently won our custody battle witlh
 our foster daughter and she means the world
 to us. She's a beautiful African American girl
 and her hair looks a lot like yours. But l'm afraid
 because I don't know what to do with her hair.
 It's a lot different from mines and our other
 children and we are at a total loss. l've tried
 looking up the YouTube videos and my husband
 went to the braiding shops so they can teach
 him how to properly braid her hair, but he's still
 pretty new and it will be a while before he gets
 used to it. Do you have any tips you can give
 me? If you don't have the time, it's okay, really! I
 just needed a little advice because I want her to
 look beautiful."
 Y'all. swear I almost started crying on aisle 6. So
 for the last 30 minutes, I spent my time talking
 to her and what products to use and how to
 properly detangle and comb her hair with the
 proper tools and what not to do with natural
 hair. And I showed her a bunch of easier to fol-
 low natural hair tutorials on YouTube and saved
 them for her. (I also had to create a YouTube
 account for her so she could save it for later.)
 but omfg, she was so sweet, and I could tell that
 she listened to every single thing I had to say
 and she took little notes on her little notepad.
 And what really filled my heart was the fact
 that her husband actually taking classes from
 African braiding shops. And she showed me a
 picture of him wearing a little sweater vest and
 loafers in a little shop surrounded by beautiful
 black women showing him how to braid black
 hair and even the lady he's braiding on is
 guiding his hands. And omfg. Bless these old
 white people and their black daughter who l
 know have new loving parents because they are
 willing to step out of their comfort zone just to
 make her feel and look beautiful
 l really hope our paths cross again one day, Mrs
 Cicilia.
 in your orbit #im still crying
 126,404 notes
I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub by VeeAyeKaye
MORE MEMES

I think it’s tumbler. Too sweet not to share. Sorry if I xposted to the wrong sub by VeeAyeKaye MORE MEMES

braid: TAYLOR SWIFT IS THE GIRL IN MIDDLE SCHOOL WHO HAD A SUPER LONG BRAID AND LOVED HORSES (SO MANY HORSE STICKERS ON HER FUCKING BINDER) AND REMINDED THE TEACHER THAT THEY FORGOT TO ASSIGN HOMEWORK
braid: TAYLOR SWIFT IS THE GIRL IN MIDDLE SCHOOL WHO HAD A SUPER LONG BRAID AND LOVED HORSES (SO MANY HORSE STICKERS ON HER FUCKING BINDER) AND REMINDED THE TEACHER THAT THEY FORGOT TO ASSIGN HOMEWORK

TAYLOR SWIFT IS THE GIRL IN MIDDLE SCHOOL WHO HAD A SUPER LONG BRAID AND LOVED HORSES (SO MANY HORSE STICKERS ON HER FUCKING BINDER) AND...

braid: Facts that will blow your mind: Braids were used for enslaved women to draw (braid) maps on their heads to escape plantations Qafrokingdom DID YOU KNOW CORNROWS WERE USED AS MAPS FOR ESCAPED FORMERLY ENSLAVED AFRICANS. San Basilio de Palenque is a village in Northern Colombia about 50 miles East of Cartagena with a population of around 3,500 people. San Basilio de Palenque is one of several walled cities that were started by escaped slaves in the 17th century. The city was set up as a refuge for escaped slaves by escaped slave Benkos Bioho, it is also the only city that has survived and is still inhabited today. The people who live here now are mainly Afro-Colombians which are direct descendants of African slaves brought by the Spanish during the Colonization of the Americas. Benkos Bioho was born in Africa and claimed to have been a king there. Captured in Africa by the Portuguese and sold several times until being sold to a Spaniard in Cartagena. Benkos Bioho tried to escape several times before he finally succeeded. After his escape he formed a town with others that freed themselves. There they developed their own language called Palenquero. The language is influenced by the Kikongo language of Congo and Angola and also by Portuguese. He also formed an army and an intelligence network to help organize the escape of other slaves and to guide them to the liberated areas. One of the things he did was have the women shape maps in their cornrows. They were also used as symbols to deliver messages. Bioho also had the women collect seeds and put them in their hair as decoration. Later the seeds would be passed on to the village so they could start to grow their own crops. He was later called King Benkos grew his army of Maroons (African refugees who escaped slavery in the Americas and formed independent settlements). His army of Maroons started raiding Spanish plantations, farms, and ranches. King Benkos also had spies that alerted him to the movements of his enemies and because of this he was never defeated. Unable to defeat King Benkos and the Maroons the Spanish Governor of Cartengena offered a peace treaty. The peace deal was finalized but a few years later was called off after the Spanish discovered a plot King Benkos was organizing against them. The Spaniards captured Benkos & 👇🏾
braid: Facts that will blow your mind:
 Braids were used for enslaved women to draw
 (braid) maps on their heads to escape plantations
 Qafrokingdom
DID YOU KNOW CORNROWS WERE USED AS MAPS FOR ESCAPED FORMERLY ENSLAVED AFRICANS. San Basilio de Palenque is a village in Northern Colombia about 50 miles East of Cartagena with a population of around 3,500 people. San Basilio de Palenque is one of several walled cities that were started by escaped slaves in the 17th century. The city was set up as a refuge for escaped slaves by escaped slave Benkos Bioho, it is also the only city that has survived and is still inhabited today. The people who live here now are mainly Afro-Colombians which are direct descendants of African slaves brought by the Spanish during the Colonization of the Americas. Benkos Bioho was born in Africa and claimed to have been a king there. Captured in Africa by the Portuguese and sold several times until being sold to a Spaniard in Cartagena. Benkos Bioho tried to escape several times before he finally succeeded. After his escape he formed a town with others that freed themselves. There they developed their own language called Palenquero. The language is influenced by the Kikongo language of Congo and Angola and also by Portuguese. He also formed an army and an intelligence network to help organize the escape of other slaves and to guide them to the liberated areas. One of the things he did was have the women shape maps in their cornrows. They were also used as symbols to deliver messages. Bioho also had the women collect seeds and put them in their hair as decoration. Later the seeds would be passed on to the village so they could start to grow their own crops. He was later called King Benkos grew his army of Maroons (African refugees who escaped slavery in the Americas and formed independent settlements). His army of Maroons started raiding Spanish plantations, farms, and ranches. King Benkos also had spies that alerted him to the movements of his enemies and because of this he was never defeated. Unable to defeat King Benkos and the Maroons the Spanish Governor of Cartengena offered a peace treaty. The peace deal was finalized but a few years later was called off after the Spanish discovered a plot King Benkos was organizing against them. The Spaniards captured Benkos & 👇🏾

DID YOU KNOW CORNROWS WERE USED AS MAPS FOR ESCAPED FORMERLY ENSLAVED AFRICANS. San Basilio de Palenque is a village in Northern Colombia...