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Bodies , Children, and Climbing: Drowning in real life looks nothing like in the movies, and in fact many parents actually watch their children drown, having no idea that it's happening Ultrafacts.tumblr.com faikitty: mermaibee: ultrafacts: According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, having no idea it is happening. Drowning does not look like drowning—Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the Instinctive Drowning Response like this: “Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs. Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.” This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc. Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water: Head low in the water, mouth at water level Head tilted back with mouth open Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus Eyes closed Hair over forehead or eyes Not using legs—vertical Hyperventilating or gasping Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway Trying to roll over on the back Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK—don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you all right?” If they can answer at all—they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents—children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why. Source/article: [x] Follow Ultrafacts for more facts! BOOST FOR THE SUMMER. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE. Can I just say thank you to OP for putting such a detailed description on this? I’ve been a lifeguard for 6 years now and of all the saves I’ve done, maybe two or three had people drowning in the stereotypical thrashing style. And even those, like the save I made last weekend, it was exactly like OP describes where the person’s head is going in and out of the water but it isn’t long enough to get any air. Mostly you recognize drowning by the look on someone’s face. If someone looks wide eyed and terrified or confused, chances are they’re drowning. That look of “oh shit” is pretty easily recognizable. And even if you can’t tell for sure: GO AFTER THEM ANYWAY. I’ve done “saves” where a kid was pretending to drown and I mistook it for real drowning, but that’s preferable to a kid ACTUALLY drowning. Also please remember that even strong swimmers can drown if they have a medical emergency, get cramps, or get too tired. If your friend knows how to swim but they’re acting funny get them to land. And even if someone can respond when you ask them if they need help, if they say they do need help? GO HELP THEM. However . If the victim is a stranger, I can’t recommend trying to get them. Lifeguards literally train to escape “attacks,” because people who are drowning can freak the fuck out and grab you and make YOU drown as well. If you do go in after someone, take hold of them from the back and talk to them the whole time. IF YOU ARE GRABBED: duck down into the water as low as you can get. The person is panicking and won’t want to go under water and should release you. Shove up at their hands and push them away from you as you duck under. Don’t die trying to save someone else. Please guys, read and memorize this post. Not all places have lifeguards. Being able to recognize drowning is such an important skill to have and you can save someone’s life.
Bodies , Children, and Climbing: Drowning in real life looks nothing like in the
 movies, and in fact many parents actually
 watch their children drown, having no idea
 that it's happening
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com
faikitty:
mermaibee:

ultrafacts:

According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, having no idea it is happening. Drowning does not look like drowning—Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene magazine, described the Instinctive Drowning Response like this:
“Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs.
Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.
Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.
Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.
From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.”
This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble—they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the Instinctive Drowning Response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long—but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.
Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:
Head low in the water, mouth at water level
Head tilted back with mouth open
Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
Eyes closed
Hair over forehead or eyes
Not using legs—vertical
Hyperventilating or gasping
Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
Trying to roll over on the back
Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder
So if a crew member falls overboard and everything looks OK—don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them, “Are you all right?” If they can answer at all—they probably are. If they return a blank stare, you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents—children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.
Source/article: [x] 
Follow Ultrafacts for more facts!


BOOST FOR THE SUMMER. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE.

Can I just say thank you to OP for putting such a detailed description on this?
I’ve been a lifeguard for 6 years now and of all the saves I’ve done, maybe two or three had people drowning in the stereotypical thrashing style. And even those, like the save I made last weekend, it was exactly like OP describes where the person’s head is going in and out of the water but it isn’t long enough to get any air. Mostly you recognize drowning by the look on someone’s face. If someone looks wide eyed and terrified or confused, chances are they’re drowning. That look of “oh shit” is pretty easily recognizable. And even if you can’t tell for sure: GO AFTER THEM ANYWAY. I’ve done “saves” where a kid was pretending to drown and I mistook it for real drowning, but that’s preferable to a kid ACTUALLY drowning.
Also please remember that even strong swimmers can drown if they have a medical emergency, get cramps, or get too tired. If your friend knows how to swim but they’re acting funny get them to land. And even if someone can respond when you ask them if they need help, if they say they do need help? GO HELP THEM.

However . If the victim is a stranger, I can’t recommend trying to get  them. Lifeguards literally train to escape “attacks,” because people who are drowning can freak the fuck out and grab you and make YOU drown as well. If you do go in after someone, take hold of them from the back and talk to them the whole time. IF YOU ARE GRABBED: duck down into the water as low as you can get. The person is panicking and won’t want to go under water and should release you. Shove up at their hands and push them away from you as you duck under. Don’t die trying to save someone else.
Please guys, read and memorize this post. Not all places have lifeguards. Being able to recognize drowning is such an important skill to have and you can save someone’s life.

faikitty: mermaibee: ultrafacts: According to the CDC, in 10 percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch the child do it, ha...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
corvussy:
thatpettyblackgirl:


the US has no excuse


some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:

The infamous $629 bandaid
Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section
Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill
Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD
Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills

A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices


Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices
Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise
Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US
Just… facility fees


Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis)
Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x)

People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse

thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money
America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
smallest-feeblest-boggart:

thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse



I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change

Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money

smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they f...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.
Tumblr, Vision, and Blog: awesomage:

SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chronic tiredness.

awesomage: SCREEN PROTECTION GLASSESMaximum prevention against insomnia, tension headache, eyestrain, blurred vision, facial cramps and chr...

Advice, Community, and Cute: Wrist Exerc Cheat-Sheet This is an advice I want to give everyone in the Splatoon Community (and also gamers, programmers and artists alike): To prevent weakness, soreness or even injury make sure to exercise your hands and wrists properly before playing! This will only take a quick minute or two but could make a huge difference and helps keeping your hands and wrists healthy and flexible. Sad Italian! Splatted Salt Shaker! Vou can use your second hand for additional stretching! gtop! Zombies! Flop-Flop! Defeat? Squeeze! Do Squids have fingernails? |These exercises should not be done by people with inflammation or serious joint damage unless recommended by a healthcare professional This sheet was illustrated by @CaptainHanyuu. Special thanks to Burnburnss and Kurage-Splatoon! jumpingjacktrash: blarghnessrawr: jvk-illustrations: I drew a quick chart about good wrist and finger exercise before playing Splatoon (or engaging in any other intense activity such as but not limited to gaming in general, programming, drawing, computer work etc.)As with all stretching exercise, these should only be done in moderate speed. You only want to loosen up, not break your hands!!… and it kinda exploded on twitter haha This is a good thing to have explode anywhere. I did some of these and my wrist felt a ton better. I do a lot of typing and repetitive motions at work (need to do more drawing) but my right wrist is always JACKED. This is such a cute and great guide for exercises all in one place! i write my first drafts longhand with a fountain pen. great for creativity (can’t backspace with a pen, and colorful ink makes everything better!) but hard on the hand. i’ve been doing some things sort of like this but it’s nice to have a reference sheet. i bet these would be good for avoiding knitting cramps too.
Advice, Community, and Cute: Wrist Exerc
 Cheat-Sheet
 This is an advice I want to give everyone in the Splatoon
 Community (and also gamers, programmers and artists
 alike): To prevent weakness, soreness or even injury make
 sure to exercise your hands and wrists properly before
 playing! This will only take a quick minute or two but could
 make a huge difference and helps keeping your hands and
 wrists healthy and flexible.
 Sad Italian!
 Splatted
 Salt Shaker!
 Vou can use your
 second hand
 for additional
 stretching!
 gtop!
 Zombies!
 Flop-Flop!
 Defeat?
 Squeeze!
 Do Squids have
 fingernails?
 |These exercises should not be done by people with inflammation or serious joint damage unless recommended by a healthcare professional
 This sheet was illustrated by @CaptainHanyuu. Special thanks to Burnburnss and Kurage-Splatoon!
jumpingjacktrash:
blarghnessrawr:

jvk-illustrations:
I drew a quick chart about good wrist and finger exercise before playing Splatoon (or engaging in any other intense activity such as but not limited to gaming in general, programming, drawing, computer work etc.)As with all stretching exercise, these should only be done in moderate speed. You only want to loosen up, not break your hands!!… and it kinda exploded on twitter haha
This is a good thing to have explode anywhere. I did some of these and my wrist felt a ton better. I do a lot of typing and repetitive motions at work (need to do more drawing) but my right wrist is always JACKED. This is such a cute and great guide for exercises all in one place!

i write my first drafts longhand with a fountain pen. great for creativity (can’t backspace with a pen, and colorful ink makes everything better!) but hard on the hand. i’ve been doing some things sort of like this but it’s nice to have a reference sheet. i bet these would be good for avoiding knitting cramps too.

jumpingjacktrash: blarghnessrawr: jvk-illustrations: I drew a quick chart about good wrist and finger exercise before playing Splatoon (or ...