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Detail: what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.
Detail: what-even-is-thiss:

bobcatdump:

jaskiegg:

mellomaia:

aphony-cree:

beyoncescock:

gahdamnpunk:

Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making


THANK YOU

I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.”
The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner
If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents 
People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings

Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents.
When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. 
I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.



God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent

“I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this



The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. 
A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.”
I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future.
Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that.
My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad.
To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time.
It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

Detail: Why so much….detail?
Detail: Why so much….detail?

Why so much….detail?

Detail: simena: Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (detail)
Detail: simena:



Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (detail)

simena: Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (detail)

Detail: The attention to detail
Detail: The attention to detail

The attention to detail

Detail: The attention to detail
Detail: The attention to detail

The attention to detail

Detail: The attention to detail
Detail: The attention to detail

The attention to detail

Detail: richiefuckfacetozier: slumberfish: player select THE DETAIL GETS ME EVERY TIME
Detail: richiefuckfacetozier:

slumberfish:

player select

THE DETAIL GETS ME EVERY TIME

richiefuckfacetozier: slumberfish: player select THE DETAIL GETS ME EVERY TIME

Detail: rahze: xanny: Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus It’s time
Detail: rahze:
xanny:

Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus


It’s time

rahze: xanny: Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus It’s time

Detail: aphroditeinfurs: Detail from The Roses of Heliogabalus by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1888
Detail: aphroditeinfurs:
Detail from The Roses of Heliogabalus by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1888

aphroditeinfurs: Detail from The Roses of Heliogabalus by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1888

Detail: the-strongest-decoy: arcticfoxbear: by-grace-of-god: prolifeproliberty: candiikismet: gingersofficial: Life path unlocked. He’s a scientist now. If your dad is telling you in great detail about something he’s passionate about, you’re going to be hooked even if you don’t understand a word. He tells us more… So now I have to deliver a quiet lecture on the Standard Model every night. He loves lists of things, like all the streets home from daycare, or the train stations between here and Central, so he loves hearing the list of leptons and quarks and bosons. Anyway, I made this poster for him, based on the CPEP ones we used to have at uni .  Alas I ran out of room for antimatter, colour charge and confinement, but hey, maybe there can be a second poster later. It’s funny though — on the surface of it, it seems like it must be far too advanced for a 3yo. But when you think about it, quarks and leptons are no more or less real to him than, say, dinosaurs or planets, and he loves those too. And he recognises the letters on the particles. I am absolutely overwhelmed by the kind and sweet things people are saying about this, thanks everyone ❤️ Addendum: he has really grasped onto the “everything is made of atoms” part of this, so tonight he listed just about every object he could think of and asked if it was made of atoms. “And my bed?”Yes, and your bed.“And that wall?”Yep.“And the armchair?”Yes, the armchair too.……“And… the book case?”Y— “And my home?”Yep, the whole apartment block.“And your home? Oh wait, your home is my home.”Haha, it is.……“But is it made of atoms?”Yep.“And… [best friend]’s home?”Yes, it is. And [other friend]’s home, and [third friend]’s home. “Is [yet another friend]’s home?” Update from the other night: “Is my… is… [extremely long pause] is my atoms poster made up of atoms?”—Yes! Yes it is. I have never heard such a contemplative silence. I think the next poster will have to be on the philosophy of referential language. Update from this morning: after listing everything in sight (mummy? daddy? fridge? milk? cereal? table? etc.) he asks “is [baby sister] made up of atoms?” yep! *runs over to her on the floor**puts face up real close to hers*“HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?” @radioactivepeasant @themagdalenwriting @iusedtohaveanaccount “HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?”
Detail: the-strongest-decoy:
arcticfoxbear:

by-grace-of-god:

prolifeproliberty:

candiikismet:

gingersofficial:



Life path unlocked. He’s a scientist now. 



If your dad is telling you in great detail about something he’s passionate about, you’re going to be hooked even if you don’t understand a word.

He tells us more…
So now I have to deliver a quiet lecture on the Standard Model every night. He loves lists of things, like all the streets home from daycare, or the train stations between here and Central, so he loves hearing the list of leptons and quarks and bosons.
Anyway, I made this poster for him, based on the CPEP ones we used to have at uni . 
Alas I ran out of room for antimatter, colour charge and confinement, but hey, maybe there can be a second poster later.
It’s funny though — on the surface of it, it seems like it must be far too advanced for a 3yo. But when you think about it, quarks and leptons are no more or less real to him than, say, dinosaurs or planets, and he loves those too. And he recognises the letters on the particles.
I am absolutely overwhelmed by the kind and sweet things people are saying about this, thanks everyone ❤️
Addendum: he has really grasped onto the “everything is made of atoms” part of this, so tonight he listed just about every object he could think of and asked if it was made of atoms.
“And my bed?”Yes, and your bed.“And that wall?”Yep.“And the armchair?”Yes, the armchair too.……“And… the book case?”Y—
“And my home?”Yep, the whole apartment block.“And your home? Oh wait, your home is my home.”Haha, it is.……“But is it made of atoms?”Yep.“And… [best friend]’s home?”Yes, it is. And [other friend]’s home, and [third friend]’s home.
“Is [yet another friend]’s home?”
Update from the other night:
“Is my… is… [extremely long pause] is my atoms poster made up of atoms?”—Yes! Yes it is.
I have never heard such a contemplative silence. I think the next poster will have to be on the philosophy of referential language.
Update from this morning: after listing everything in sight (mummy? daddy? fridge? milk? cereal? table? etc.) he asks “is [baby sister] made up of atoms?”
yep!
*runs over to her on the floor**puts face up real close to hers*“HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?”

@radioactivepeasant @themagdalenwriting @iusedtohaveanaccount


“HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?”

the-strongest-decoy: arcticfoxbear: by-grace-of-god: prolifeproliberty: candiikismet: gingersofficial: Life path unlocked. He’s a...

Detail: lonequixote: Gustav Klimt Danae (detail) (via @lonequixote)
Detail: lonequixote:




Gustav Klimt 



Danae

(detail)


(via @lonequixote)

lonequixote: Gustav Klimt Danae (detail) (via @lonequixote)

Detail: just-art5: Petunias by Octav Bancila
Detail: just-art5:



Petunias by Octav Bancila

just-art5: Petunias by Octav Bancila

Detail: spoutziki-art: Jardin benlliure - Jose Benlliure Gil
Detail: spoutziki-art:

Jardin benlliure - Jose Benlliure Gil

spoutziki-art: Jardin benlliure - Jose Benlliure Gil

Detail: aqua-regia009: Girl with a Candle (Detail) - Léon-François Comerre
Detail: aqua-regia009:
Girl with a Candle (Detail) -
Léon-François Comerre

aqua-regia009: Girl with a Candle (Detail) - Léon-François Comerre

Detail: agabella: The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)
Detail: agabella:

The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)

agabella: The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)

Detail: hag6:Lisa Yuskavage, Blonde (detail from Blonde, Brunette and Redhead), 1995, oil on linen
Detail: hag6:Lisa Yuskavage, Blonde (detail from Blonde, Brunette and Redhead), 1995, oil on linen

hag6:Lisa Yuskavage, Blonde (detail from Blonde, Brunette and Redhead), 1995, oil on linen

Detail: agabella: The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)
Detail: agabella:

The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)

agabella: The two Fridas (1939)- Frida Kahlo (detail)

Detail: earnedmagic: william blake, titania and puck with fairies dancing (detail), 1786 / florence welch and her witches, big god, 2018
Detail: earnedmagic:

william blake, titania and puck with fairies dancing (detail), 1786 / florence welch and her witches, big god, 2018

earnedmagic: william blake, titania and puck with fairies dancing (detail), 1786 / florence welch and her witches, big god, 2018

Detail: lonequixote: Gustav Klimt Three Ages of Woman (detail) (via @lonequixote)
Detail: lonequixote:

Gustav Klimt
Three Ages of Woman (detail)
(via @lonequixote)

lonequixote: Gustav Klimt Three Ages of Woman (detail) (via @lonequixote)

Detail: aqua-regia009: The angel of death striking a door during the plague of Rome (Detail), 1879. Engraving by Levasseur after Jules-Élie Delaunay
Detail: aqua-regia009:


The angel of death striking a door during the plague of Rome

 (Detail), 1879. 
Engraving by Levasseur after 
Jules-Élie Delaunay

aqua-regia009: The angel of death striking a door during the plague of Rome (Detail), 1879. Engraving by Levasseur after Jules-Élie...

Detail: twofigs: Caravaggio, The Incredulity of St. Thomas (detail), c.1601Lucio Fontana, Spatial Concept, 1960
Detail: twofigs:



Caravaggio, The Incredulity of St. Thomas (detail), c.1601Lucio Fontana, Spatial Concept, 1960

twofigs: Caravaggio, The Incredulity of St. Thomas (detail), c.1601Lucio Fontana, Spatial Concept, 1960

Detail: detournementsmineurs: Erin O’Connor (detail) for “Diva Assolut” by Koto Bolofo, Vogue Deutsch, 2005.
Detail: detournementsmineurs:

Erin O’Connor (detail) for “Diva Assolut” by Koto Bolofo, Vogue Deutsch, 2005.

detournementsmineurs: Erin O’Connor (detail) for “Diva Assolut” by Koto Bolofo, Vogue Deutsch, 2005.

Detail: renaissance-art: Giovanni Baglione c. 1602 Sacred and Profane Love (detail)
Detail: renaissance-art:
Giovanni Baglione c. 1602
Sacred and Profane Love (detail)

renaissance-art: Giovanni Baglione c. 1602 Sacred and Profane Love (detail)

Detail: rahze: xanny: Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus It’s time
Detail: rahze:

xanny:

Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus


It’s time

rahze: xanny: Why is 10:24 the only background detail in focus It’s time

Detail: magictransistor: Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth, R. Buckminster Fuller, Simon & Schuster Pocket Books: 3rd Edition (Detail), 1971.
Detail: magictransistor:
Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth, R. Buckminster Fuller, Simon & Schuster Pocket Books: 3rd Edition (Detail), 1971.

magictransistor: Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth, R. Buckminster Fuller, Simon & Schuster Pocket Books: 3rd Edition (Detail), 1971.

Detail: neon-flamingo:Vintage Pack Of Mini Flocked Brown Teddy Bears
Detail: neon-flamingo:Vintage Pack Of Mini Flocked Brown Teddy Bears

neon-flamingo:Vintage Pack Of Mini Flocked Brown Teddy Bears

Detail: by-grace-of-god: prolifeproliberty: candiikismet: gingersofficial: Life path unlocked. He’s a scientist now. If your dad is telling you in great detail about something he’s passionate about, you’re going to be hooked even if you don’t understand a word. He tells us more… So now I have to deliver a quiet lecture on the Standard Model every night. He loves lists of things, like all the streets home from daycare, or the train stations between here and Central, so he loves hearing the list of leptons and quarks and bosons. Anyway, I made this poster for him, based on the CPEP ones we used to have at uni .  Alas I ran out of room for antimatter, colour charge and confinement, but hey, maybe there can be a second poster later. It’s funny though — on the surface of it, it seems like it must be far too advanced for a 3yo. But when you think about it, quarks and leptons are no more or less real to him than, say, dinosaurs or planets, and he loves those too. And he recognises the letters on the particles. I am absolutely overwhelmed by the kind and sweet things people are saying about this, thanks everyone ❤️ Addendum: he has really grasped onto the “everything is made of atoms” part of this, so tonight he listed just about every object he could think of and asked if it was made of atoms. “And my bed?”Yes, and your bed.“And that wall?”Yep.“And the armchair?”Yes, the armchair too.……“And… the book case?”Y— “And my home?”Yep, the whole apartment block.“And your home? Oh wait, your home is my home.”Haha, it is.……“But is it made of atoms?”Yep.“And… [best friend]’s home?”Yes, it is. And [other friend]’s home, and [third friend]’s home. “Is [yet another friend]’s home?” Update from the other night: “Is my… is… [extremely long pause] is my atoms poster made up of atoms?”—Yes! Yes it is. I have never heard such a contemplative silence. I think the next poster will have to be on the philosophy of referential language. Update from this morning: after listing everything in sight (mummy? daddy? fridge? milk? cereal? table? etc.) he asks “is [baby sister] made up of atoms?” yep! *runs over to her on the floor**puts face up real close to hers*“HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?”
Detail: by-grace-of-god:
prolifeproliberty:

candiikismet:

gingersofficial:



Life path unlocked. He’s a scientist now. 



If your dad is telling you in great detail about something he’s passionate about, you’re going to be hooked even if you don’t understand a word.

He tells us more…
So now I have to deliver a quiet lecture on the Standard Model every night. He loves lists of things, like all the streets home from daycare, or the train stations between here and Central, so he loves hearing the list of leptons and quarks and bosons.
Anyway, I made this poster for him, based on the CPEP ones we used to have at uni . 
Alas I ran out of room for antimatter, colour charge and confinement, but hey, maybe there can be a second poster later.
It’s funny though — on the surface of it, it seems like it must be far too advanced for a 3yo. But when you think about it, quarks and leptons are no more or less real to him than, say, dinosaurs or planets, and he loves those too. And he recognises the letters on the particles.
I am absolutely overwhelmed by the kind and sweet things people are saying about this, thanks everyone ❤️
Addendum: he has really grasped onto the “everything is made of atoms” part of this, so tonight he listed just about every object he could think of and asked if it was made of atoms.
“And my bed?”Yes, and your bed.“And that wall?”Yep.“And the armchair?”Yes, the armchair too.……“And… the book case?”Y—
“And my home?”Yep, the whole apartment block.“And your home? Oh wait, your home is my home.”Haha, it is.……“But is it made of atoms?”Yep.“And… [best friend]’s home?”Yes, it is. And [other friend]’s home, and [third friend]’s home.
“Is [yet another friend]’s home?”
Update from the other night:
“Is my… is… [extremely long pause] is my atoms poster made up of atoms?”—Yes! Yes it is.
I have never heard such a contemplative silence. I think the next poster will have to be on the philosophy of referential language.
Update from this morning: after listing everything in sight (mummy? daddy? fridge? milk? cereal? table? etc.) he asks “is [baby sister] made up of atoms?”
yep!
*runs over to her on the floor**puts face up real close to hers*“HI! YOU’RE MADE UP OF LOTS OF ATOMS! DID YOU KNOW?”

by-grace-of-god: prolifeproliberty: candiikismet: gingersofficial: Life path unlocked. He’s a scientist now. If your dad is tell...

Detail: overdose-art:Saint Catherine (detail), After Bernardino Luini, 1510 
Detail: overdose-art:Saint Catherine (detail), After Bernardino Luini, 1510 

overdose-art:Saint Catherine (detail), After Bernardino Luini, 1510 

Detail: that-catholic-shinobi: keyhollow: supreme-leader-stoat: agent-of-empathy: dragongyrlwren: dr-algernop: 13flamingbees: avatarsymbolism: avatrashh: avatar-gifs: Avatar: The Last Airbender 1.05 | The King of Omashu Wow those moves look like someone who’s childhood best friend was an airbender …Shit, you’re right.  That spin he does. That is an airbendery move.  Literally the exact same move Aang pulls when he gets off his glider (cant find a gif but like… I promise) This shows attention to detail was unreal. Even the fall backwards! That looks like the exact kind of thing a fun loving Airbender kid would do while showing off gliders and airbending proficiency. the best benders in this show tend to be the ones who adapt elements of other bending techniques. Bumi has some airbender-y movements, Zuko and Iroh use some Air and Water movements, even Katara tends to use some earthbender looking moves when bending ice Meanwhile Toph just took earthbending and cranked it all the way up to 11. Everyone else: The spice of variety! The four elements make mine stronger! Ballerina time! Toph:….meTal….bendy bendy take into account that Toph might not be able to take other bending styles into her own. Because those styles (especially fire and air) require you to lift your feet off the ground and for Toph she would lose her way of connecting to the world like he’s used too. Toph took earthbending, made it her bitch, and made it adapt to her needs as a disabled person.
Detail: that-catholic-shinobi:
keyhollow:

supreme-leader-stoat:

agent-of-empathy:

dragongyrlwren:

dr-algernop:


13flamingbees:

avatarsymbolism:

avatrashh:

avatar-gifs:
Avatar: The Last Airbender 1.05 | The King of Omashu

Wow those moves look like someone who’s childhood best friend was an airbender 

…Shit, you’re right. 
That spin he does. That is an airbendery move. 


Literally the exact same move Aang pulls when he gets off his glider (cant find a gif but like… I promise)


This shows attention to detail was unreal. 


Even the fall backwards! That looks like the exact kind of thing a fun loving Airbender kid would do while showing off gliders and airbending proficiency. 


the best benders in this show tend to be the ones who adapt elements of other bending techniques. Bumi has some airbender-y movements, Zuko and Iroh use some Air and Water movements, even Katara tends to use some earthbender looking moves when bending ice

Meanwhile Toph just took earthbending and cranked it all the way up to 11.


Everyone else: The spice of variety! The four elements make mine stronger! Ballerina time!
Toph:….meTal….bendy bendy 


take into account that Toph might not be able to take other bending styles into her own. Because those styles (especially fire and air) require you to lift your feet off the ground and for Toph she would lose her way of connecting to the world like he’s used too.
Toph took earthbending, made it her bitch, and made it adapt to her needs as a disabled person.

that-catholic-shinobi: keyhollow: supreme-leader-stoat: agent-of-empathy: dragongyrlwren: dr-algernop: 13flamingbees: avatarsymbol...

Detail: nobrashfestivity: NASA, Satellite photo of a snowstorm over the Mediterranean Willem de Kooning, Untitled, (detail)
Detail: nobrashfestivity:

NASA, Satellite photo of a snowstorm over the Mediterranean 
Willem de Kooning, Untitled, (detail)

nobrashfestivity: NASA, Satellite photo of a snowstorm over the Mediterranean Willem de Kooning, Untitled, (detail)

Detail: kelogsloops: Where the Quiet Things Areprints | tutorials
Detail: kelogsloops:

Where the Quiet Things Areprints | tutorials

kelogsloops: Where the Quiet Things Areprints | tutorials

Detail: detailedart:Detail : Spring Scattering Stars, 1927, by Edwin Blashfield.
Detail: detailedart:Detail : Spring Scattering Stars, 1927, by Edwin Blashfield.

detailedart:Detail : Spring Scattering Stars, 1927, by Edwin Blashfield.

Detail: colorel11: via
Detail: colorel11:

via

colorel11: via

Detail: aqua-regia009: The Death of Cleopatra (Detail), after 1659 - Guido Cagnacci
Detail: aqua-regia009:
The Death of Cleopatra (Detail),
after 1659
- Guido Cagnacci

aqua-regia009: The Death of Cleopatra (Detail), after 1659 - Guido Cagnacci

Detail: closeupofpaintings: Charles Courtney Curran - Betty Newell, 1922 (detail), oil on canvas
Detail: closeupofpaintings:

Charles Courtney Curran - Betty Newell, 1922 (detail), oil on canvas

closeupofpaintings: Charles Courtney Curran - Betty Newell, 1922 (detail), oil on canvas

Detail: redlipstickresurrected: Hieronymus Bosch aka Jeroen Anthonissen van Aken (Dutch, 1450-1516, Netherlands) - The Garden of Earthly Delights (detail), c. 1480-1505, Paintings: Oil on Panel
Detail: redlipstickresurrected:

Hieronymus Bosch aka Jeroen Anthonissen van Aken (Dutch, 1450-1516, Netherlands) - The Garden of Earthly Delights (detail), c. 1480-1505, Paintings: Oil on Panel

redlipstickresurrected: Hieronymus Bosch aka Jeroen Anthonissen van Aken (Dutch, 1450-1516, Netherlands) - The Garden of Earthly Delight...

Detail: aqua-regia009: Leda (Detail), 2015 - Gail Potocki
Detail: aqua-regia009:

Leda (Detail), 2015 - Gail Potocki

aqua-regia009: Leda (Detail), 2015 - Gail Potocki

Detail: sakrogoat: Joos van Cleve - Lucretia (detail)
Detail: sakrogoat:
Joos van Cleve - Lucretia (detail)

sakrogoat: Joos van Cleve - Lucretia (detail)

Detail: kristalknobb: Illustration for Cosmopolitan, June 1974 Detail
Detail: kristalknobb:
Illustration for Cosmopolitan, June 1974 Detail

kristalknobb: Illustration for Cosmopolitan, June 1974 Detail

Detail: THE COvnreS OF Ox barcarole: Detail from Diana Cecil, Countess of Oxford, Anthony van Dyck, 1638.
Detail: THE COvnreS OF Ox
barcarole:
Detail from Diana Cecil, Countess of Oxford, Anthony van Dyck, 1638.

barcarole: Detail from Diana Cecil, Countess of Oxford, Anthony van Dyck, 1638.