🔥 | Latest

diplomat: Polish diplomat attempts last ditch peace negotiations with Germany and the Soviet Union (1939) (Colorized)
diplomat: Polish diplomat attempts last ditch peace negotiations with Germany and the Soviet Union (1939) (Colorized)

Polish diplomat attempts last ditch peace negotiations with Germany and the Soviet Union (1939) (Colorized)

diplomat: Nazi Germany Meets Japanese Diplomat During WWII (1941)
diplomat: Nazi Germany Meets Japanese Diplomat During WWII (1941)

Nazi Germany Meets Japanese Diplomat During WWII (1941)

diplomat: multismusa-deactivated20170218 What she says: I'm fine What she means: I understand the Chronicles of Narnia was at its heart a fairytale with theological analogies for children. But why did Lewis never address how they had to adapted to life on Earth again. Why does no one talk about how the Pevensies had to grow up with a kingdom of responsibilities on their shoul- ders, only to return to Earth and be children Take Lucy, she was youngest and perhaps she adapted more quickly-but she had the memories and mind of a grown woman in an adolescent body. Edmund literally found himself in Narnia, he went from a selfish boy to mature and experienced man. He found a purpose and identity through his experiences to come back as just Edmund, Peter's younger brother. Did people wonder why the sullen, sour boy came back, carrying himself like a wisened king? Did his mother wonder why he and Peter suddenly got along so well, why they spent so much time together now? And Susan, the girl of logistics and reason came back with a difference in her. She learned how to be a diplomat and ambassador, Susan the Gentle had to live to endure not-so-gentle circumstances. She had the respect she wanted, only to be just another teen girl. And Peter, he entered the manhood and maturity he so wanted. He earned the responsibility and stripes he yearned for. He learned to command armies and conduct the menial tasks demanded of a king to rule a nation But he came back, appearing to be just anther glory-hungry boy. Not to mention the PTSD they must have struggled with. Especially Ed mund. How often did he wake up in a sweat, screaming a sibling or comrades name? His parents believe it's the war, but it's an entirely different one he has nightmares about. How often did he have trouble with flashbacks and mood swings? And how many times did he and Peter sit over a newspaper or near the radio listening to reports on the troops. How often did they pour over lost battles and de- bate better strategies. Did their parents ever wonder why they seemed to understand flight war so well? How long was it before they stopped discussing these things in front of people? Why does no one talk about this??? cocoartistwrites Why am i fucking crying limblogs Why does no one talk about how the Pevensies had to grow up with a kingdom of responsibilities on their shoulders, only to return to Earth and be children It's not addressed because it's understood. It was the shared experience of the generation You are describing coming home from World War One, battle wearied and aged beyond belief, but walking around in the body of a youth. C S Lewis went to the front line of the Somme on his nineteenth birthday and went back to complete uni in 1918 after demob saxifraga-x-urbium Not seen it with this very very pertinent addition before 119,012 notes Remember, Listening to Her Is Important
diplomat: multismusa-deactivated20170218
 What she says: I'm fine
 What she means: I understand the Chronicles
 of Narnia was at its heart a fairytale with
 theological analogies for children. But why did
 Lewis never address how they had to adapted
 to life on Earth again. Why does no one talk
 about how the Pevensies had to grow up with
 a kingdom of responsibilities on their shoul-
 ders, only to return to Earth and be children
 Take Lucy, she was youngest and perhaps
 she adapted more quickly-but she had the
 memories and mind of a grown woman in
 an adolescent body. Edmund literally found
 himself in Narnia, he went from a selfish boy
 to mature and experienced man. He found a
 purpose and identity through his experiences
 to come back as just Edmund, Peter's younger
 brother. Did people wonder why the sullen,
 sour boy came back, carrying himself like a
 wisened king? Did his mother wonder why
 he and Peter suddenly got along so well, why
 they spent so much time together now? And
 Susan, the girl of logistics and reason came
 back with a difference in her. She learned how
 to be a diplomat and ambassador, Susan the
 Gentle had to live to endure not-so-gentle
 circumstances. She had the respect she
 wanted, only to be just another teen girl. And
 Peter, he entered the manhood and maturity
 he so wanted. He earned the responsibility
 and stripes he yearned for. He learned to
 command armies and conduct the menial
 tasks demanded of a king to rule a nation
 But he came back, appearing to be just anther
 glory-hungry boy. Not to mention the PTSD
 they must have struggled with. Especially Ed
 mund. How often did he wake up in a sweat,
 screaming a sibling or comrades name? His
 parents believe it's the war, but it's an entirely
 different one he has nightmares about. How
 often did he have trouble with flashbacks and
 mood swings? And how many times did he
 and Peter sit over a newspaper or near the
 radio listening to reports on the troops. How
 often did they pour over lost battles and de-
 bate better strategies. Did their parents ever
 wonder why they seemed to understand flight
 war so well? How long was it before they
 stopped discussing these things in front of
 people? Why does no one talk about this???
 cocoartistwrites
 Why am i fucking crying
 limblogs
 Why does no one talk about how the
 Pevensies had to grow up with a kingdom
 of responsibilities on their shoulders, only to
 return to Earth and be children
 It's not addressed because it's understood. It
 was the shared experience of the generation
 You are describing coming home from World
 War One, battle wearied and aged beyond
 belief, but walking around in the body of a
 youth. C S Lewis went to the front line of the
 Somme on his nineteenth birthday and went
 back to complete uni in 1918 after demob
 saxifraga-x-urbium
 Not seen it with this very very pertinent
 addition before
 119,012 notes
Remember, Listening to Her Is Important

Remember, Listening to Her Is Important

diplomat: H, HAHAL! CANNOT BELIEvE THE ER MARRYING AN ELF NO LESS! AYE SUCH BEAU, WASTED ON İRST THEIR DAMN KIND THE SINGLE TIME THEY MANAGE TO SEDUCE ONE OF OUR O WN ELVEN EYES IT BE GHM THE RAVISHING 6 HM nyodrite: fozmeadows: words-writ-in-starlight: jam-art: thranduil sleeps calmer knowing even if his son married a dwarf at least he married The Supermodel dwarf and singlehandedly crushed the hopes of single dwarves and dwarrowdams everywhere this is my headcanon and you will never take it from me. listen, just Listen for a second, okay. Gimli Gloinul is from the line of Durin okay, he’s from the line of KINGS, his bloodline stands up against Legolas’ perfectly, if the elves and dwarves got their shit together for a hot second they would be like “YES, PERFECT, A DIPLOMATIC MARRIAGE TO BIND OUR HOUSES TOGETHER AND NEVER SHALL THE TWAIN THROW ONE ANOTHER TO DRAGONS…again.”  because you have a king’s son and a king’s nephew which, well, I love Dain but he’s not an EREBOR KING and GIMLI IS FROM THE FAMILY OF EREBOR KINGS. And Gimli acts like he’s from the line of Erebor kings, too, okay, he’s a diplomat and a warrior and a nobleman, he’s the sort of person who SAYS things like ‘faithless is he who says fairwell when the road darkens’ and stares down Elrond Peredhil in his own home when his strength and faith are questioned.  And he’s the kind of person who swears his allegiance to people he barely knows because it’s Right and Good and Gimli knows it. And Thorin Oakenshield was handsome, and his sister the lady Dis is beautiful, and Gimli’s cousins Fili and Kili were fine young dwarrows, and Gimli’s mother is a great beauty. Basically my point here is that Gimli, proud strong gimli with his firebeard hair and bold laugh and mithril tongue and clever fingers, broke the hearts of everyone in Erebor and not a few people outside of Erebor when he married a goddamn elf.  Like.  Not even Arwen Undomiel (WHO MARRIED A GODDAMN HUMAN, it’s been a weird couple of years in Middle-Earth, everyone wonders strongly if they’ve been drinking too much).  Like he’s not even marrying a great beauty of the elves, Legolas isn’t ugly by elvish standards but also he’s nothing particularly special, and he’s not a great diplomat, and he’s BARELY a king’s son because everyone knows that Mirkwood elves are…a little odd.  Legolas is a big cheerful hunter who sings songs he doesn’t remember all of, who chatters to trees and has no sense of the right thing to say even if he’s developed enough self-preservation to know the wrong thing to say, and FOR THE LOVE OF MAHAL HE FIGHTS WITH A BOW. “GIMLI” Gloin bellows “YOU TURNED DOWN THIRTY-TWO SUITORS FROM FINE DWARVISH LINES FOR THIS” “Ignore him, amrâlime, he’ll get over it” Gimli says in amusement as he beckons Legolas over to his forge, where he’s carefully smithing mithril-inlaid gold marriage clasps that will grip fine elvish hair.  It’s too hot in the forge to wear shirts, if you’re working.  Every dwarf in twenty feet stops what they’re doing to watch Gimli’s biceps flex as he holds up a jewel for Legolas’ inspection. “YOU COULD HAVE HAD A HAREM” Gloin wails from down the hall. #a headcanon I never knew I needed until this very moment @acrossthetallgreenriver
diplomat: H, HAHAL!
 CANNOT
 BELIEvE
 THE
 ER
 MARRYING
 AN
 ELF NO
 LESS!

 AYE
 SUCH BEAU,
 WASTED ON
 İRST THEIR DAMN KIND THE
 SINGLE TIME THEY MANAGE
 TO SEDUCE ONE OF OUR O WN
 ELVEN EYES
 IT BE GHM THE RAVISHING
 6

 HM
nyodrite:

fozmeadows:


words-writ-in-starlight:

jam-art:
thranduil sleeps calmer knowing even if his son married a dwarf at least he married The Supermodel dwarf and singlehandedly crushed the hopes of single dwarves and dwarrowdams everywhere
this is my headcanon and you will never take it from me.
listen, just Listen for a second, okay.
Gimli Gloinul is from the line of Durin okay, he’s from the line of KINGS, his bloodline stands up against Legolas’ perfectly, if the elves and dwarves got their shit together for a hot second they would be like “YES, PERFECT, A DIPLOMATIC MARRIAGE TO BIND OUR HOUSES TOGETHER AND NEVER SHALL THE TWAIN THROW ONE ANOTHER TO DRAGONS…again.”  because you have a king’s son and a king’s nephew which, well, I love Dain but he’s not an EREBOR KING and GIMLI IS FROM THE FAMILY OF EREBOR KINGS.
And Gimli acts like he’s from the line of Erebor kings, too, okay, he’s a diplomat and a warrior and a nobleman, he’s the sort of person who SAYS things like ‘faithless is he who says fairwell when the road darkens’ and stares down Elrond Peredhil in his own home when his strength and faith are questioned.  And he’s the kind of person who swears his allegiance to people he barely knows because it’s Right and Good and Gimli knows it.
And Thorin Oakenshield was handsome, and his sister the lady Dis is beautiful, and Gimli’s cousins Fili and Kili were fine young dwarrows, and Gimli’s mother is a great beauty.
Basically my point here is that Gimli, proud strong gimli with his firebeard hair and bold laugh and mithril tongue and clever fingers, broke the hearts of everyone in Erebor and not a few people outside of Erebor when he married a goddamn elf.  Like.  Not even Arwen Undomiel (WHO MARRIED A GODDAMN HUMAN, it’s been a weird couple of years in Middle-Earth, everyone wonders strongly if they’ve been drinking too much).  Like he’s not even marrying a great beauty of the elves, Legolas isn’t ugly by elvish standards but also he’s nothing particularly special, and he’s not a great diplomat, and he’s BARELY a king’s son because everyone knows that Mirkwood elves are…a little odd.  Legolas is a big cheerful hunter who sings songs he doesn’t remember all of, who chatters to trees and has no sense of the right thing to say even if he’s developed enough self-preservation to know the wrong thing to say, and FOR THE LOVE OF MAHAL HE FIGHTS WITH A BOW.
“GIMLI” Gloin bellows “YOU TURNED DOWN THIRTY-TWO SUITORS FROM FINE DWARVISH LINES FOR THIS”
“Ignore him, amrâlime, he’ll get over it” Gimli says in amusement as he beckons Legolas over to his forge, where he’s carefully smithing mithril-inlaid gold marriage clasps that will grip fine elvish hair.  It’s too hot in the forge to wear shirts, if you’re working.  Every dwarf in twenty feet stops what they’re doing to watch Gimli’s biceps flex as he holds up a jewel for Legolas’ inspection.
“YOU COULD HAVE HAD A HAREM” Gloin wails from down the hall.

#a headcanon I never knew I needed until this very moment


@acrossthetallgreenriver

nyodrite: fozmeadows: words-writ-in-starlight: jam-art: thranduil sleeps calmer knowing even if his son married a dwarf at least he m...

diplomat: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.
diplomat: grrlpup:
antifainternational:

mousezilla:

rhube:

fahrlight:

westsemiteblues:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!

I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.

Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. 
The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  
I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. 

Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.

always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.

grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled:...

diplomat: apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedlybespectacled: gdfalksen: Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died. Why can’t we have a movie about him? He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce. His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions. He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife. He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint. Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy. It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people. It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them. He told an interviewer: You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage. He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral. I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them! I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers. Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa.  The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”   I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art.  Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa. always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important. heroic
diplomat: apismel1fera:
grrlpup:

antifainternational:

mousezilla:

rhube:

fahrlight:

westsemiteblues:

returnofthejudai:

robowolves:

bemusedlybespectacled:

gdfalksen:

Chiune Sugihara. This man saved 6000 Jews. He was a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania. When the Nazis began rounding up Jews, Sugihara risked his life to start issuing unlawful travel visas to Jews. He hand-wrote them 18 hrs a day. The day his consulate closed and he had to evacuate, witnesses claim he was STILL writing visas and throwing from the train as he pulled away. He saved 6000 lives. The world didn’t know what he’d done until Israel honored him in 1985, the year before he died.

Why can’t we have a movie about him?

He was often called “Sempo”, an alternative reading of the characters of his first name, as that was easier for Westerners to pronounce.
His wife, Yukiko, was also a part of this; she is often credited with suggesting the plan. The Sugihara family was held in a Soviet POW camp for 18 months until the end of the war; within a year of returning home, Sugihara was asked to resign - officially due to downsizing, but most likely because the government disagreed with his actions.
He didn’t simply grant visas - he granted visas against direct orders, after attempting three times to receive permission from the Japanese Foreign Ministry and being turned down each time. He did not “misread” orders; he was in direct violation of them, with the encouragement and support of his wife.
He was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations in 1985, a year before he died in Kamakura; he and his descendants have also been granted permanent Israeli citizenship. He was also posthumously awarded the Life Saving Cross of Lithuania (1993); Commander’s Cross Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland (1996); and the Commander’s Cross with Star of the Order of Polonia Restituta (2007). Though not canonized, some Eastern Orthodox Christians recognize him as a saint.
Sugihara was born in Gifu on the first day of 1900, January 1. He achieved top marks in his schooling; his father wanted him to become a physician, but Sugihara wished to pursue learning English. He deliberately failed the exam by writing only his name and then entered Waseda, where he majored in English. He joined the Foreign Ministry after graduation and worked in the Manchurian Foreign Office in Harbin (where he learned Russian and German; he also converted to the Eastern Orthodox Church during this time). He resigned his post in protest over how the Japanese government treated the local Chinese citizens. He eventually married Yukiko Kikuchi, who would suggest and encourage his acts in Lithuania; they had four sons together. Chiune Sugihara passed away July 31, 1986, at the age of 86. Until her own passing in 2008, Yukiko continued as an ambassador of his legacy.
It is estimated that the Sugiharas saved between 6,000-10,000 Lithuanian and Polish Jewish people.

It’s a tragedy that the Sugiharas aren’t household names. They are among the greatest heroes of WWII. Is it because they were from an Axis Power? Is it because they aren’t European? I don’t know. But I’ve decided to always reblog them when they come across my dash. If I had the money, I would finance a movie about them.

He told an interviewer:
You want to know about my motivation, don’t you? Well. It is the kind of sentiments anyone would have when he actually sees refugees face to face, begging with tears in their eyes. He just cannot help but sympathize with them. Among the refugees were the elderly and women. They were so desperate that they went so far as to kiss my shoes, Yes, I actually witnessed such scenes with my own eyes. Also, I felt at that time, that the Japanese government did not have any uniform opinion in Tokyo. Some Japanese military leaders were just scared because of the pressure from the Nazis; while other officials in the Home Ministry were simply ambivalent. 
People in Tokyo were not united. I felt it silly to deal with them. So, I made up my mind not to wait for their reply. I knew that somebody would surely complain about me in the future. But, I myself thought this would be the right thing to do. There is nothing wrong in saving many people’s lives….The spirit of humanity, philanthropy…neighborly friendship…with this spirit, I ventured to do what I did, confronting this most difficult situation—and because of this reason, I went ahead with redoubled courage.
He died in nearly complete obscurity in Japan. His neighbors were shocked when people from all over, including Israeli diplomatic personnel, showed up at quiet little Mr. Sugihara’s funeral.

I will forever reblog this, I wish more people would know about them!

I liked this before when it had way less information. Thank you, history-sharers.

Tucked away in a corner in L.A.’s Little Tokyo is a life-sized statue of Chiune, seated on a bench and smiling gently as he holds out a visa. 
The stone next to him bears a quote from the Talmud; “He who saves one life, saves the entire world.”  
I had no idea it existed until a few weeks ago, but it’s since become one of my favorite pieces of public art. 

Chiune Sugihara.  Original antifa.

always reblog Chiune Sugihara. I have his picture over my desk at work to remind me what’s important.

heroic

apismel1fera: grrlpup: antifainternational: mousezilla: rhube: fahrlight: westsemiteblues: returnofthejudai: robowolves: bemusedl...

diplomat: <p>Black history month day 25: American political scientist and diplomat Condoleezza Rice.</p> <p>Condoleezza Rice was born in Birmingham Alabama on November 14, 1954. Her father was a guidance counselor and a minister and her mother was a music teacher. Her name derives from the music-related term con dolcezza meaning &ldquo;with sweetness&rdquo;.</p> <p>Rice had an art-filled childhood. She began to learn French, music, figure skating, and ballet at the age of three. Her initial dream was to become a concert pianist. While she did not become a professional, she still plays with a chamber music group and once accompanied cellist Yo-Yo Ma in playing Johannes Brahms&rsquo; Violin Sonata in D Minor at Constitution Hall in April 2002 for the National Medal of Arts Awards.</p> <p>Rice grew up in the segregated South, and her parents raised her with best education and resources possible so that she could stand against the discrimination of their culture. She grew up needing to be &ldquo;twice as good&rdquo; as nonminorities to gain the same respect. One of her friends and schoolmates was one of the girls killed in one of the infamous church bombings in Birmingham. Rice said later of that event: &ldquo; I remember the bombing of that Sunday School at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1963. I did not see it happen, but I heard it happen, and I felt it happen, just a few blocks away at my father&rsquo;s church. It is a sound that I will never forget, that will forever reverberate in my ears. That bomb took the lives of four young girls, including my friend and playmate, Denise McNair. The crime was calculated to suck the hope out of young lives, bury their aspirations. But those fears were not propelled forward, those terrorists failed.&rdquo;</p> <p>While at the University of Denver, Rice changed her major from music to political science and graduated with honors. She then earned her Masters in political science from the University of Notre Dame.</p> <p>Rice became the first African-American female to serve as Secretary of State, serving under President George W. Bush. She was only the second African-American Secretary of State after Colin Powell, and only the second female after Madeline Albright. She currently serves as a faculty member of the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a director of its Global Center for Business and the Economy.</p>
diplomat: <p>Black history month day 25: American political scientist and diplomat Condoleezza Rice.</p>

<p>Condoleezza Rice was born in Birmingham Alabama on November 14, 1954. Her father was a guidance counselor and a minister and her mother was a music teacher. Her name derives from the music-related term con dolcezza meaning &ldquo;with sweetness&rdquo;.</p>

<p>Rice had an art-filled childhood. She began to learn French, music, figure skating, and ballet at the age of three. Her initial dream was to become a concert pianist. While she did not become a professional, she still plays with a chamber music group and once accompanied cellist Yo-Yo Ma in playing Johannes Brahms&rsquo; Violin Sonata in D Minor at Constitution Hall in April 2002 for the National Medal of Arts Awards.</p>

<p>Rice grew up in the segregated South, and her parents raised her with best education and resources possible so that she could stand against the discrimination of their culture. She grew up needing to be &ldquo;twice as good&rdquo; as nonminorities to gain the same respect. One of her friends and schoolmates was one of the girls killed in one of the infamous church bombings in Birmingham. Rice said later of that event: &ldquo; I remember the bombing of that Sunday School at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1963. I did not see it happen, but I heard it happen, and I felt it happen, just a few blocks away at my father&rsquo;s church. It is a sound that I will never forget, that will forever reverberate in my ears. That bomb took the lives of four young girls, including my friend and playmate, Denise McNair. The crime was calculated to suck the hope out of young lives, bury their aspirations. But those fears were not propelled forward, those terrorists failed.&rdquo;</p>

<p>While at the University of Denver, Rice changed her major from music to political science and graduated with honors. She then earned her Masters in political science from the University of Notre Dame.</p>

<p>Rice became the first African-American female to serve as Secretary of State, serving under President George W. Bush. She was only the second African-American Secretary of State after Colin Powell, and only the second female after Madeline Albright. She currently serves as a faculty member of the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a director of its Global Center for Business and the Economy.</p>

<p>Black history month day 25: American political scientist and diplomat Condoleezza Rice.</p> <p>Condoleezza Rice was born in Birmingha...

diplomat: Democrats I DEMAND that Trump's National Security Advisor, Michael Flynn, be arrested for treason and charged with violating the Logan Act for secretly communicating with Russian officials to undermine American foreign policy. SHARE IF YOU AGREE! You know what to do! It's not enough that he just resigned... he needs to be arrested and tried for treason. An investigation is also in order as to what Trump knew, when he knew it, and why he chose to IGNORE the Department of Justice's warning that Flynn was being actively blackmailed by Putin's Russia. Something smells fishy! According to the Washington Post: "From that call and subsequent intercepts, FBI agents wrote a secret report summarizing ­Flynn’s discussions with Kislyak. Yates, then the deputy attorney general, considered Flynn’s comments in the intercepted call to be “highly significant” and “potentially illegal,” according to an official familiar with her thinking. Yates and other intelligence officials suspected that Flynn could be in violation of an obscure U.S. statute known as the Logan Act, which bars U.S. citizens from interfering in diplomatic disputes with another country." According to the New York Times: "The Justice Department had warned the White House that Mr. Flynn had misled senior Trump administration officials about whether he had discussed American sanctions against Vladimir V. Putin’s regime during a secret phone call with Russia’s ambassador to the United States weeks before the inauguration, and that he could be open to blackmail by Russia, said a former senior official." Read more here: http:-wapo.st-2lJm1Cs and here: http:-nyti.ms-2kqyI3S
diplomat: Democrats
 I DEMAND
 that Trump's National Security Advisor,
 Michael Flynn, be arrested for treason
 and
 charged with violating the Logan Act for
 secretly communicating with Russian officials
 to undermine American foreign policy.
 SHARE IF YOU AGREE!
You know what to do! It's not enough that he just resigned... he needs to be arrested and tried for treason. An investigation is also in order as to what Trump knew, when he knew it, and why he chose to IGNORE the Department of Justice's warning that Flynn was being actively blackmailed by Putin's Russia. Something smells fishy! According to the Washington Post: "From that call and subsequent intercepts, FBI agents wrote a secret report summarizing ­Flynn’s discussions with Kislyak. Yates, then the deputy attorney general, considered Flynn’s comments in the intercepted call to be “highly significant” and “potentially illegal,” according to an official familiar with her thinking. Yates and other intelligence officials suspected that Flynn could be in violation of an obscure U.S. statute known as the Logan Act, which bars U.S. citizens from interfering in diplomatic disputes with another country." According to the New York Times: "The Justice Department had warned the White House that Mr. Flynn had misled senior Trump administration officials about whether he had discussed American sanctions against Vladimir V. Putin’s regime during a secret phone call with Russia’s ambassador to the United States weeks before the inauguration, and that he could be open to blackmail by Russia, said a former senior official." Read more here: http:-wapo.st-2lJm1Cs and here: http:-nyti.ms-2kqyI3S

You know what to do! It's not enough that he just resigned... he needs to be arrested and tried for treason. An investigation is also in...