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Fannie Lou Hamer: Rp @JustinoMora1, co-founder of @undocumedia: "I first learned about MartinLutherKingJr's work and legacy in 7th grade - one year after arriving to the United States from Mexico. I was inspired by his "I Have a Dream" speech and several quotes from his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail". Dr. King's unapologetic way of resisting and speaking truth to power stayed in the back of my mind and I would remember them whenever I witnessed the prosecution and oppression of immigrants and people of color in my community and in the news. Dr. King's words played a big role in my coming-out as undocumented, unafraid, and unapologetic! . My initial dream was for the U.S. government to give undocumented immigrants a pathway to become citizens so that we could live in peace and pursue our dreams. As I learned more about the true history of the United States, became more civically engaged, and exchanged thoughts and opinions with other activists, my perspective on liberation and freedom began to change. I realized that "freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed" - MLKjr. I learned that immigration reform would not happen without everyone's involvement - this inspired me to get involved in grassroots organizing and become my own best advocate. I learned that if you're not white, your citizenship status provides not much protection against institutionalized racism, police brutality, micro-aggressions, discrimination, income inequality, and so forth. This is why we must all be involved in dismantling white supremacy and systems of oppression. . My dream evolved into one of achieving liberation for all. I realized, in the words of the great African American activist Fannie Lou Hamer, that "nobody's free until everybody's free". This is why I strongly believe and engage in intersectionality politics - I strongly support BlackLivesMatter, NoMuslimBan, WomensRights, IndigenousRights, LGBTQrights, WaterIsLife, the MeToo movement, and so forth. I ask everyone reading this post to get involved (if you still aren't) and to get others involved in the fight for human rights in any capacity that you can. MLKDay cleanDreamActNow
Fannie Lou Hamer: Rp @JustinoMora1, co-founder of @undocumedia: "I first learned about MartinLutherKingJr's work and legacy in 7th grade - one year after arriving to the United States from Mexico. I was inspired by his "I Have a Dream" speech and several quotes from his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail". Dr. King's unapologetic way of resisting and speaking truth to power stayed in the back of my mind and I would remember them whenever I witnessed the prosecution and oppression of immigrants and people of color in my community and in the news. Dr. King's words played a big role in my coming-out as undocumented, unafraid, and unapologetic! . My initial dream was for the U.S. government to give undocumented immigrants a pathway to become citizens so that we could live in peace and pursue our dreams. As I learned more about the true history of the United States, became more civically engaged, and exchanged thoughts and opinions with other activists, my perspective on liberation and freedom began to change. I realized that "freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed" - MLKjr. I learned that immigration reform would not happen without everyone's involvement - this inspired me to get involved in grassroots organizing and become my own best advocate. I learned that if you're not white, your citizenship status provides not much protection against institutionalized racism, police brutality, micro-aggressions, discrimination, income inequality, and so forth. This is why we must all be involved in dismantling white supremacy and systems of oppression. . My dream evolved into one of achieving liberation for all. I realized, in the words of the great African American activist Fannie Lou Hamer, that "nobody's free until everybody's free". This is why I strongly believe and engage in intersectionality politics - I strongly support BlackLivesMatter, NoMuslimBan, WomensRights, IndigenousRights, LGBTQrights, WaterIsLife, the MeToo movement, and so forth. I ask everyone reading this post to get involved (if you still aren't) and to get others involved in the fight for human rights in any capacity that you can. MLKDay cleanDreamActNow

Rp @JustinoMora1, co-founder of @undocumedia: "I first learned about MartinLutherKingJr's work and legacy in 7th grade - one year after a...

Fannie Lou Hamer: blackness-by-your-side: Fannie Lou Hamer did a lot for black people. She deserved to be widely recognized.
Fannie Lou Hamer: blackness-by-your-side:
Fannie Lou Hamer did a lot for black people. She deserved to be widely recognized.

blackness-by-your-side: Fannie Lou Hamer did a lot for black people. She deserved to be widely recognized.

Fannie Lou Hamer: OUR ANCESTOR FANNIE LOU HAMER SPEAKS FROM THE GRAVE ON THE THE NATIONAL ANTHEM PROTEST OF TODAY If we don't have it, you won't have it either. You can't bhold enough walls or gated communities u to escape... . @Regranned from @17thsoulja5 - "You see the flag 🇺🇸is its drenched with our blood. Because, you see, so many of our Ancestors was killed because we have never accepted slavery. We’ve had to live under it, but we’ve never wanted it! So we know that this flag is drenched with our blood, so what the young people are saying now “Give us a chance to be young men, respected as a man, as we know this country was built on the Black backs of Black people across this country. And, if we don’t have it, you ain’t gonna have it either, cause we gone tear it up,” that’s what they’re saying, and people ought to understand that. I don’t see why they don’t understand it. They know what they’ve done to us. All across this country, they know what they’ve done to us. This country is desperately sick and man is on the critical list. I really don’t know where we go from here." - Fannie Lou Hamer The Heritage of Slavery (1968) . . . . Fannie Lou Hamer Civil Rights Activist, Activist, Philanthropist (1917-1977) On her tombstone is written one of her most famous quotes: "I am sick and tired of being sick and tired." fannielouhamer ✊🏽✊🏽🙌🏽🙌🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽🖤🖤 @tattle_tailzz 17thsoulja BlackIg17th blackheroes - regrann
Fannie Lou Hamer: OUR ANCESTOR FANNIE LOU HAMER
 SPEAKS FROM THE GRAVE ON THE THE
 NATIONAL ANTHEM PROTEST OF TODAY
If we don't have it, you won't have it either. You can't bhold enough walls or gated communities u to escape... . @Regranned from @17thsoulja5 - "You see the flag 🇺🇸is its drenched with our blood. Because, you see, so many of our Ancestors was killed because we have never accepted slavery. We’ve had to live under it, but we’ve never wanted it! So we know that this flag is drenched with our blood, so what the young people are saying now “Give us a chance to be young men, respected as a man, as we know this country was built on the Black backs of Black people across this country. And, if we don’t have it, you ain’t gonna have it either, cause we gone tear it up,” that’s what they’re saying, and people ought to understand that. I don’t see why they don’t understand it. They know what they’ve done to us. All across this country, they know what they’ve done to us. This country is desperately sick and man is on the critical list. I really don’t know where we go from here." - Fannie Lou Hamer The Heritage of Slavery (1968) . . . . Fannie Lou Hamer Civil Rights Activist, Activist, Philanthropist (1917-1977) On her tombstone is written one of her most famous quotes: "I am sick and tired of being sick and tired." fannielouhamer ✊🏽✊🏽🙌🏽🙌🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽🖤🖤 @tattle_tailzz 17thsoulja BlackIg17th blackheroes - regrann

If we don't have it, you won't have it either. You can't bhold enough walls or gated communities u to escape... . @Regranned from @17thso...

Fannie Lou Hamer: WHY THE LEFT-WING NEEDS A GUN CULTURE @Regrann from @nyc4revolution - THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "One of the first arenas of that struggle was the campaign to expose lynching in Mississippi, specifically the 1954 murder of Emmett Till. The key organizer of that campaign, TRM Howard, not only carried guns for his own protection, but made sure that there were armed guards at all times around campaign spokespeople like Mamie Till. After the rise of Martin Luther King, nonviolence became the image of civil rights, but this nominally pacifist movement never renounced its right to bear arms. When the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) came to the Deep South to organize, they encountered a vigorous Black gun culture among those who were prepared to campaign for equality. Fannie Lou Hamer, legendary founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), told one interviewer that, “I keep a shotgun in every corner of my bedroom and the first cracker even look like he wants to throw some dynamite on my porch won’t write his mama again.” Prior to the MFDP’s work, voter suppression of African-Americans was the rule in Mississippi, but after its ascendance in the late 1960s, Blacks had full ballot access and the Klan was in retreat. The Mississippi movement represents the most effective organizing of the post-war Left; Their policy on armed self-defense can teach us a great deal, particularly as the whole country begins to feel more and more like the Jim Crow South. But aren’t guns inherently oppressive, reactionary and patriarchal? This idea has found currency in the years since the end of the civil rights movement, but the years since the civil rights movement haven’t been especially good for the Left. From Jimmy Carter to Obama—not to mention from Reagan to Trump—the US has steadily slid to the Right in all but the most superficial ways. In place of working-class activists like Fannie Lou Hamer, we’re now led by pseudo-working-class celebrities like Michael Moore, who cemented the gun control consensus with his sensationalized documentary Bowling for Columbine... " [cont. in next comment] - regrann
Fannie Lou Hamer: WHY THE LEFT-WING
 NEEDS A GUN
 CULTURE
@Regrann from @nyc4revolution - THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "One of the first arenas of that struggle was the campaign to expose lynching in Mississippi, specifically the 1954 murder of Emmett Till. The key organizer of that campaign, TRM Howard, not only carried guns for his own protection, but made sure that there were armed guards at all times around campaign spokespeople like Mamie Till. After the rise of Martin Luther King, nonviolence became the image of civil rights, but this nominally pacifist movement never renounced its right to bear arms. When the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) came to the Deep South to organize, they encountered a vigorous Black gun culture among those who were prepared to campaign for equality. Fannie Lou Hamer, legendary founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), told one interviewer that, “I keep a shotgun in every corner of my bedroom and the first cracker even look like he wants to throw some dynamite on my porch won’t write his mama again.” Prior to the MFDP’s work, voter suppression of African-Americans was the rule in Mississippi, but after its ascendance in the late 1960s, Blacks had full ballot access and the Klan was in retreat. The Mississippi movement represents the most effective organizing of the post-war Left; Their policy on armed self-defense can teach us a great deal, particularly as the whole country begins to feel more and more like the Jim Crow South. But aren’t guns inherently oppressive, reactionary and patriarchal? This idea has found currency in the years since the end of the civil rights movement, but the years since the civil rights movement haven’t been especially good for the Left. From Jimmy Carter to Obama—not to mention from Reagan to Trump—the US has steadily slid to the Right in all but the most superficial ways. In place of working-class activists like Fannie Lou Hamer, we’re now led by pseudo-working-class celebrities like Michael Moore, who cemented the gun control consensus with his sensationalized documentary Bowling for Columbine... " [cont. in next comment] - regrann

@Regrann from @nyc4revolution - THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "...

Fannie Lou Hamer: WHY THE LEFT-WING NEEDS A GUN CULTURE THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "One of the first arenas of that struggle was the campaign to expose lynching in Mississippi, specifically the 1954 murder of Emmett Till. The key organizer of that campaign, TRM Howard, not only carried guns for his own protection, but made sure that there were armed guards at all times around campaign spokespeople like Mamie Till. After the rise of Martin Luther King, nonviolence became the image of civil rights, but this nominally pacifist movement never renounced its right to bear arms. When the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) came to the Deep South to organize, they encountered a vigorous Black gun culture among those who were prepared to campaign for equality. Fannie Lou Hamer, legendary founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), told one interviewer that, “I keep a shotgun in every corner of my bedroom and the first cracker even look like he wants to throw some dynamite on my porch won’t write his mama again.” Prior to the MFDP’s work, voter suppression of African-Americans was the rule in Mississippi, but after its ascendance in the late 1960s, Blacks had full ballot access and the Klan was in retreat. The Mississippi movement represents the most effective organizing of the post-war Left; Their policy on armed self-defense can teach us a great deal, particularly as the whole country begins to feel more and more like the Jim Crow South. But aren’t guns inherently oppressive, reactionary and patriarchal? This idea has found currency in the years since the end of the civil rights movement, but the years since the civil rights movement haven’t been especially good for the Left. From Jimmy Carter to Obama—not to mention from Reagan to Trump—the US has steadily slid to the Right in all but the most superficial ways. In place of working-class activists like Fannie Lou Hamer, we’re now led by pseudo-working-class celebrities like Michael Moore, who cemented the gun control consensus with his sensationalized documentary Bowling for Columbine... " [cont. in next comment]
Fannie Lou Hamer: WHY THE LEFT-WING
 NEEDS A GUN
 CULTURE
THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "One of the first arenas of that struggle was the campaign to expose lynching in Mississippi, specifically the 1954 murder of Emmett Till. The key organizer of that campaign, TRM Howard, not only carried guns for his own protection, but made sure that there were armed guards at all times around campaign spokespeople like Mamie Till. After the rise of Martin Luther King, nonviolence became the image of civil rights, but this nominally pacifist movement never renounced its right to bear arms. When the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) came to the Deep South to organize, they encountered a vigorous Black gun culture among those who were prepared to campaign for equality. Fannie Lou Hamer, legendary founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), told one interviewer that, “I keep a shotgun in every corner of my bedroom and the first cracker even look like he wants to throw some dynamite on my porch won’t write his mama again.” Prior to the MFDP’s work, voter suppression of African-Americans was the rule in Mississippi, but after its ascendance in the late 1960s, Blacks had full ballot access and the Klan was in retreat. The Mississippi movement represents the most effective organizing of the post-war Left; Their policy on armed self-defense can teach us a great deal, particularly as the whole country begins to feel more and more like the Jim Crow South. But aren’t guns inherently oppressive, reactionary and patriarchal? This idea has found currency in the years since the end of the civil rights movement, but the years since the civil rights movement haven’t been especially good for the Left. From Jimmy Carter to Obama—not to mention from Reagan to Trump—the US has steadily slid to the Right in all but the most superficial ways. In place of working-class activists like Fannie Lou Hamer, we’re now led by pseudo-working-class celebrities like Michael Moore, who cemented the gun control consensus with his sensationalized documentary Bowling for Columbine... " [cont. in next comment]

THIS. THIS. THIS. CLICK THE LINK IN BIO FOR FULL PIECE. SHARE WIDELY. RECOMMENDED READING OF THE DAY. l "One of the first arenas of that...