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goofy goobers: Only true goofy goobers will get this
 goofy goobers: Only true goofy goobers will get this

Only true goofy goobers will get this

goofy goobers: Congratulations My Goofy Goobers
 goofy goobers: Congratulations My Goofy Goobers

Congratulations My Goofy Goobers

goofy goobers: My younger sisters goofy goobers
 goofy goobers: My younger sisters goofy goobers

My younger sisters goofy goobers

goofy goobers: Merry Christmas and happy holidays from these two goofy goobers 🥳
 goofy goobers: Merry Christmas and happy holidays from these two goofy goobers 🥳

Merry Christmas and happy holidays from these two goofy goobers 🥳

goofy goobers: Laramie Movie Scope: SpongeBob SquarePants: The Movie Mildly crude humor for kids or promotion of pedophilia? by Patrick Ivers, Film Critic (2004, PG: "Some mild crude humor") I expect mostly boys between 9 and 13 might enjoy Stephen Hillenburg's feature-length creation, which incorporates some live action with the animation, from the animated Nickelodeon TV series, starring SpongeBob SquarePants and his goofy starfish buddy Patrick Star Residing at the sea bottom in a pineapple, SpongeBob, a happy-go-lucky rectangular sponge, is a fry cook at the Krusty Krab diner in the community of Bikini Bottom, hoping to become the new manager at Eugene Krab's new restaurant KK2 where his popular Krabby Patties are sold However, when Mr Krab instead makes old Squidward Tenacles manager, because to be a manager you've got to be a man, SpongeBob, who's "just a kid," and Patrick overindulge on ice-cream deserts at Goofy Goobers. Later when Mr Krab's jealous rival Plankton at the Chum Bucket swipes King Neptune's crown, leaving him bald, and blames Mr Krab, SpongeBob and Patrick cheerfully though naively volunteer for a hazardous journey to Shell City, from which no one has ever returned, to recover the crown and save Mr Krab's life. To get back they travel through the ocean on David Hasselhoffs bare back. Do kids today know the actor from Bay Watch? The crude humor includes Patrick arriving with a little flag clutched between his buttocks, sloppy eating habits and belching, Patrick slobbering with the hots for Princess Mindy (the only significant female character other than Karen, Plankton's computer-monitor wife), numerous references and displays of boys' underwear (e.g., Patrick says to Mindy, "Did you see my underwear?" and when she says, "No," he replies, "Did you want to?"), and Patrick dancing in women's net stockings. There's a scene early on where SpongeBob - who eats a bar of soap and pronounces, "Cleanliness is next to managerliness" - suddenly appears in the shower with Squidward, scrubbing the old fellow's back; but Squidward cries out and covers up as soon as he sees it's SpongeBob In Cole Smithey's article, "It's The Pedophilia Stupid: How SpongeBob Promotes Pedophilia, Not Homosexuality," the author writes: The derogatory argot in French for a homosexual male is pédé (pronounced Pay Day). It's a term that also means pedophile. The religious right in America has posited a similar equivalence between "gay" and "pedophile" in their assertions that SpongeBob is a reprehensible influence of the youth of America because he is (they say) gay. They're missing the point. SpongeBob's character may or may not be gay, but that's not what makes his influence so pernicious. For all that's been made of the alleged homosexual subtext in "The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie" and consequently the television program, it's confounding that no one has pointed out how blatant the pedophile references written directly into its text far outweigh its "gay" overtones. This presents a problematic backlash for liberals who defend SpongeBob in the name of "diversity" because they too are witlessly confusing pedophilia with homosexuality and thus falling into another rhetoric trap set by the right. One insidious aspect of SpongeBob's actions in "The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie" is that the child character is shown as an instigator in intimacy with adult male characters. What troubles me as a critic is that the script seems expertly tailored as a tool for John Doe pedophile to convince his child neighbor that there are acceptable situations in which a grown man and a little boy may be in various states of undress together. Nonetheless, Cole's piece (for the entire article go to colesmithey.com.) is a fascinating read, but does he really believe the filmmakers have an agenda to encourage children to make themselves vulnerable to adults for sexual gratification? Apparently so. The animated, crude illustrations of fish might suggest phallic figures to someone looking for them, but I think Cole has gone on a Freudian fishing expedition. To an adult with some sophistication the messages may appear to be explicit, but to a child I doubt the communication would be at all obvious. Until kids reach puberty most aren't aware of clearly defined sexual roles outside of gross stereotypes. Lots of teenagers harbor misconceptions and myths about sexuality In fact, because Cole has written an article in which he takes pains to distinguish a message of pedophilia from one of homosexuality, apparently most adults didn't understand the theme with its supposedly overt details and dialogue Prior to seeing this film, I'd only briefly seen SpongeBob on TV. I don't know whether or not subliminal messages in cartoons are effective or not on preadolescent minds. If parents and others are worried about such messages, then they should remove their offspring from Western culture where advertising is a constant barrage of come-ons. Certainly the TV set should be removed from the premises. As a child I enjoyed watching Popeye (spinach is my favorite vegetable) and Bugs Bunny (raw carrots are tasty too) and the Roadrunner (maybe that's why I decided to attend Arizona State University) in which every episode involved considerable violence (in several scenes we see violence or its threat in this movie), but I don't resort to violence to resolve problems From my own experiences as an educator, and my wife's as a librarian, I've seen how parents and other adults read into innocent stories and passages meanings that just weren't intended. Do you know what really was going on between the little girl and the old man between chapters of the classic children's book Heidi? I was googling random stuff when i found a website form 2009 claiming the "Spongebob movie" was promoting pedophilia or something.
 goofy goobers: Laramie Movie Scope:
 SpongeBob SquarePants: The Movie
 Mildly crude humor for kids or
 promotion of pedophilia?
 by Patrick Ivers, Film Critic
 (2004, PG: "Some mild crude humor") I expect mostly boys between 9 and 13 might enjoy Stephen Hillenburg's feature-length creation, which incorporates some live action with the animation, from the animated Nickelodeon TV series, starring SpongeBob SquarePants and his goofy starfish
 buddy Patrick Star
 Residing at the sea bottom in a pineapple, SpongeBob, a happy-go-lucky rectangular sponge, is a fry cook at the Krusty Krab diner in the community of Bikini Bottom, hoping to become the new manager at Eugene Krab's new restaurant KK2 where his popular Krabby Patties are sold
 However, when Mr Krab instead makes old Squidward Tenacles manager, because to be a manager you've got to be a man, SpongeBob, who's "just a kid," and Patrick overindulge on ice-cream deserts at Goofy Goobers.
 Later when Mr Krab's jealous rival Plankton at the Chum Bucket swipes King Neptune's crown, leaving him bald, and blames Mr Krab, SpongeBob and Patrick cheerfully though naively volunteer for a hazardous journey to Shell City, from which no one has ever returned, to recover the crown
 and save Mr Krab's life. To get back they travel through the ocean on David Hasselhoffs bare back. Do kids today know the actor from Bay Watch?
 The crude humor includes Patrick arriving with a little flag clutched between his buttocks, sloppy eating habits and belching, Patrick slobbering with the hots for Princess Mindy (the only significant female character other than Karen, Plankton's computer-monitor wife), numerous references and
 displays of boys' underwear (e.g., Patrick says to Mindy, "Did you see my underwear?" and when she says, "No," he replies, "Did you want to?"), and Patrick dancing in women's net stockings.
 There's a scene early on where SpongeBob - who eats a bar of soap and pronounces, "Cleanliness is next to managerliness" - suddenly appears in the shower with Squidward, scrubbing the old fellow's back; but Squidward cries out and covers up as soon as he sees it's SpongeBob
 In Cole Smithey's article, "It's The Pedophilia Stupid: How SpongeBob Promotes Pedophilia, Not Homosexuality," the author writes:
 The derogatory argot in French for a homosexual male is pédé (pronounced Pay Day). It's a term that also means pedophile. The religious right in America has posited a similar equivalence between "gay" and "pedophile" in their assertions that SpongeBob is a reprehensible influence of the
 youth of America because he is (they say) gay. They're missing the point. SpongeBob's character may or may not be gay, but that's not what makes his influence so pernicious. For all that's been made of the alleged homosexual subtext in "The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie" and consequently
 the television program, it's confounding that no one has pointed out how blatant the pedophile references written directly into its text far outweigh its "gay" overtones. This presents a problematic backlash for liberals who defend SpongeBob in the name of "diversity" because they too are
 witlessly confusing pedophilia with homosexuality and thus falling into another rhetoric trap set by the right.
 One insidious aspect of SpongeBob's actions in "The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie" is that the child character is shown as an instigator in intimacy with adult male characters. What troubles me as a critic is that the script seems expertly tailored as a tool for John Doe pedophile to convince
 his child neighbor that there are acceptable situations in which a grown man and a little boy may be in various states of undress together.
 Nonetheless, Cole's piece (for the entire article go to colesmithey.com.) is a fascinating read, but does he really believe the filmmakers have an agenda to encourage children to make themselves vulnerable to adults for sexual gratification? Apparently so.
 The animated, crude illustrations of fish might suggest phallic figures to someone looking for them, but I think Cole has gone on a Freudian fishing expedition. To an adult with some sophistication the messages may appear to be explicit, but to a child I doubt the communication would be at all
 obvious. Until kids reach puberty most aren't aware of clearly defined sexual roles outside of gross stereotypes. Lots of teenagers harbor misconceptions and myths about sexuality
 In fact, because Cole has written an article in which he takes pains to distinguish a message of pedophilia from one of homosexuality, apparently most adults didn't understand the theme with its supposedly overt details and dialogue
 Prior to seeing this film, I'd only briefly seen SpongeBob on TV. I don't know whether or not subliminal messages in cartoons are effective or not on preadolescent minds. If parents and others are worried about such messages, then they should remove their offspring from Western culture where
 advertising is a constant barrage of come-ons. Certainly the TV set should be removed from the premises.
 As a child I enjoyed watching Popeye (spinach is my favorite vegetable) and Bugs Bunny (raw carrots are tasty too) and the Roadrunner (maybe that's why I decided to attend Arizona State University) in which every episode involved considerable violence (in several scenes we see violence or
 its threat in this movie), but I don't resort to violence to resolve problems
 From my own experiences as an educator, and my wife's as a librarian, I've seen how parents and other adults read into innocent stories and passages meanings that just weren't intended. Do you know what really was going on between the little girl and the old man between chapters of the
 classic children's book Heidi?
I was googling random stuff when i found a website form 2009 claiming the "Spongebob movie" was promoting pedophilia or something.

I was googling random stuff when i found a website form 2009 claiming the "Spongebob movie" was promoting pedophilia or something.

goofy goobers: We're all goofy goobers, yeah!
 goofy goobers: We're all goofy goobers, yeah!

We're all goofy goobers, yeah!

goofy goobers: This is a baby pufferfish, or Miss Puff to you goofy goobers
 goofy goobers: This is a baby pufferfish, or Miss Puff to you goofy goobers

This is a baby pufferfish, or Miss Puff to you goofy goobers