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Africa, Memes, and Work: Somali woman with bananas k 197Os a chakabarS Analysis of the Economic System of Somalia "Italian colonialism could not see beyond bananas, practically it didn’t develop anything beyond bananas. It was a kind of colonialism that did not even look after its own interests: In other words it was short-sighted. Then came independence and things did not change very much, because the old leaders were simply the puppets controlled by old colonial interests." - Siyaad Barre Let us investigate the real economic situation of those years and examine the conditions of the agricultural, industrial and service sectors which had survived the difficult events the country experienced, during the scramble for Africa at the end of the Second World War and the necessary creation of a new international order. This will be done with the help of unpublished sources from the historical archives of the Banca d’Italia, which give tangible evidence of its work, even after the end of the Trusteeship. The Economic-Agrarian Activities of the Population and Their Evolution About 4-5 of the population of Somalia was engaged in agriculture and subsistence pastoral farming. The country was divided into four regions: northern Somalia or Migiurtinia with an arid climate and little vegetation, central Somalia or Mudug, equally arid and with a nomadic population, central-southern Somalia, which had the most developed agricultural and animal husbandry sectors and southern Somalia or Lower Juba with thick vegetation and very rich fauna. One of the greatest problems was the shortage of water. Water reserves were limited to the area between the Jubba and Shabelle Rivers and outside of this area there were only wells. The most modern forms of agriculture were concentrated in the southern area where there are greater water resources: banana and sugar cane plantations. In the other regions of the country the lack of water made agricultural resources very scarce, limiting activity to oases where date palms were cultivated. There were, therefore, two basic agricultural sectors: one of a modern type oriented towards exportation, whose main crops were sugar cane, bananas, cotton, peanuts, cassava and grapefruit; more below 👇🏿 chakabars
Africa, Memes, and Work: Somali woman with bananas k 197Os a
 chakabarS
Analysis of the Economic System of Somalia "Italian colonialism could not see beyond bananas, practically it didn’t develop anything beyond bananas. It was a kind of colonialism that did not even look after its own interests: In other words it was short-sighted. Then came independence and things did not change very much, because the old leaders were simply the puppets controlled by old colonial interests." - Siyaad Barre Let us investigate the real economic situation of those years and examine the conditions of the agricultural, industrial and service sectors which had survived the difficult events the country experienced, during the scramble for Africa at the end of the Second World War and the necessary creation of a new international order. This will be done with the help of unpublished sources from the historical archives of the Banca d’Italia, which give tangible evidence of its work, even after the end of the Trusteeship. The Economic-Agrarian Activities of the Population and Their Evolution About 4-5 of the population of Somalia was engaged in agriculture and subsistence pastoral farming. The country was divided into four regions: northern Somalia or Migiurtinia with an arid climate and little vegetation, central Somalia or Mudug, equally arid and with a nomadic population, central-southern Somalia, which had the most developed agricultural and animal husbandry sectors and southern Somalia or Lower Juba with thick vegetation and very rich fauna. One of the greatest problems was the shortage of water. Water reserves were limited to the area between the Jubba and Shabelle Rivers and outside of this area there were only wells. The most modern forms of agriculture were concentrated in the southern area where there are greater water resources: banana and sugar cane plantations. In the other regions of the country the lack of water made agricultural resources very scarce, limiting activity to oases where date palms were cultivated. There were, therefore, two basic agricultural sectors: one of a modern type oriented towards exportation, whose main crops were sugar cane, bananas, cotton, peanuts, cassava and grapefruit; more below 👇🏿 chakabars

Analysis of the Economic System of Somalia "Italian colonialism could not see beyond bananas, practically it didn’t develop anything beyond ...

Donald Trump, Facebook, and Future: NEVER FORGET The Free Thought ON FEBRUARY 19. 1942. THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES AUTHORIZED THE GOVERNMENT TO INCARCERATE AMERICANS SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY LOOKED LIKE THE TENEMY, MORE THAN II0.000 AMERICAN CITIZENS & IMMIGRANTS OF JAPANESE ANCESTRY WERE FORCED TO GIVE UP THEIR HOMES. BUSINESSES AND WAY OF LIFE. 💭 Can’t Happen Here? 75 Years Ago, a President’s Executive Order Put US Citizens in Prison Camps... 😡 REPORT: (link to article in our bio) Today marks the DayOfRemembrance, because on February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, opening one of the nastiest chapters in United States history — the mass internment of Japanese Americans. . And while much discussion has been made of President Donald Trump’s Mexico border wall, immigrant raids, and Muslim-majority nation immigration ban, for swaths of the country, the predominant sentiment still comprises some version of, it can’t happen here. . But it can. It did. . And the abomination of Japanese American InternmentCamps — where more than two-thirds of the 120,000 detainees had been born in the United States — must not be forgotten, understated, or passed over like an historical anomaly. Because that’s precisely why our more abhorrent moments creep from the past, transformed into modern, and oft worse, manifestations of an evil we thought swept into history’s dustbin — collective memory lapse nearly guarantees a repeat performance. . Will we ever learn? . “When the order was first signed, there was uncertainty,” writes U.S. Representative Doris Matsui of Roosevelt’s decree for Quartz. “Who, exactly, was impacted by this? Where would they and their families go? What would happen to their businesses? Their homes? Details about the implementation of the order were unclear, and families faced confusion and fear about what would happen to them. With the stroke of a pen, their future was suddenly unknown. People’s lives had changed and they couldn’t even be sure how... . - Continued - . 💭 Read the FULL Report: (link in bio) http:-thefreethoughtproject.com-japanese-internment-camps-order- 💭 Join Us: @TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 LIKE our Facebook page & Visit our website for more News and Information. Link in Bio.... 💭 www.TheFreeThoughtProject.com
Donald Trump, Facebook, and Future: NEVER FORGET
 The Free Thought
 ON FEBRUARY 19. 1942. THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED
 STATES AUTHORIZED THE GOVERNMENT TO INCARCERATE
 AMERICANS SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY LOOKED LIKE THE
 TENEMY, MORE THAN II0.000 AMERICAN CITIZENS &
 IMMIGRANTS OF JAPANESE ANCESTRY WERE FORCED TO
 GIVE UP THEIR HOMES. BUSINESSES AND WAY OF LIFE.
💭 Can’t Happen Here? 75 Years Ago, a President’s Executive Order Put US Citizens in Prison Camps... 😡 REPORT: (link to article in our bio) Today marks the DayOfRemembrance, because on February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, opening one of the nastiest chapters in United States history — the mass internment of Japanese Americans. . And while much discussion has been made of President Donald Trump’s Mexico border wall, immigrant raids, and Muslim-majority nation immigration ban, for swaths of the country, the predominant sentiment still comprises some version of, it can’t happen here. . But it can. It did. . And the abomination of Japanese American InternmentCamps — where more than two-thirds of the 120,000 detainees had been born in the United States — must not be forgotten, understated, or passed over like an historical anomaly. Because that’s precisely why our more abhorrent moments creep from the past, transformed into modern, and oft worse, manifestations of an evil we thought swept into history’s dustbin — collective memory lapse nearly guarantees a repeat performance. . Will we ever learn? . “When the order was first signed, there was uncertainty,” writes U.S. Representative Doris Matsui of Roosevelt’s decree for Quartz. “Who, exactly, was impacted by this? Where would they and their families go? What would happen to their businesses? Their homes? Details about the implementation of the order were unclear, and families faced confusion and fear about what would happen to them. With the stroke of a pen, their future was suddenly unknown. People’s lives had changed and they couldn’t even be sure how... . - Continued - . 💭 Read the FULL Report: (link in bio) http:-thefreethoughtproject.com-japanese-internment-camps-order- 💭 Join Us: @TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 LIKE our Facebook page & Visit our website for more News and Information. Link in Bio.... 💭 www.TheFreeThoughtProject.com

💭 Can’t Happen Here? 75 Years Ago, a President’s Executive Order Put US Citizens in Prison Camps... 😡 REPORT: (link to article in our bio) T...

Africa, Beautiful, and Google: Google Black Women are Black Women are queens Black Women are beautiful Black Women are nurturing Black Women are intelligent Black Women are loyal Black Women are creators Black Women have amazing hair Do not let anyone tell you otherwise Google Search Fooling Lucky Pre-capitalist, matriarchal civilisations in Africa included the Nigerian Zazzau, Sudanese Kandake, Angolan Nzinga, and Ashanti of Ghana, to name but a few. The quintessential African matriarchal system was most evident and most enduring in black Ancient Egypt. Women in Ancient Egypt owned and had complete control over both movable and immovable property, such as real estate in 3000 BC. As late as the 1960s, this right could not be claimed by women in some parts of the United States. A close look at Ancient Egyptian papyrus' reveals that society was strictly matrilinial and inheritance and descent was through the female line. The Egyptian woman enjoyed the same legal and economic rights as the Egyptian man, and the proof of this is reflected in Egyptian art and historical inscriptions. Egypt was an unequal society, but the inequality was based much more upon differences in the social classes, rather than differences in gender. From ancient legal documents, we know that women were able to manage and dispose of private property, including land, portable goods, servants, livestock, and financial instruments such as endowments and annuities. A woman could administer all her property independently and according to her free will and in several excavated cemeteries the richest tombs were those of women. The independence and leadership roles of Ancient Egyptian women are part of an African cultural pattern that began millennia ago and continued into recent times, until Europeans brought colonial Christianity to Africa. In the 1860s, the colonial explorer and Christian missionary, Dr David Livingstone, wrote of meeting female chiefs in the Congo, and in most of the monarchical systems of traditional Africa, there were either one or two women of the highest rank who occupied a position at par with that of the king or complementary to it. Professor of Ancient African History, Barbara Lesko, illustrates how anthropologists who have studied African history and records of early travellers and missionaries tell us, "everywhere in Africa that one scrapes the surface one finds ethno-historical data on the authority once shared by women". chakabars
Africa, Beautiful, and Google: Google
 Black Women are
 Black Women are queens
 Black Women are beautiful
 Black Women are nurturing
 Black Women are intelligent
 Black Women are loyal
 Black Women are creators
 Black Women have amazing hair
 Do not let anyone tell you otherwise
 Google Search Fooling Lucky
Pre-capitalist, matriarchal civilisations in Africa included the Nigerian Zazzau, Sudanese Kandake, Angolan Nzinga, and Ashanti of Ghana, to name but a few. The quintessential African matriarchal system was most evident and most enduring in black Ancient Egypt. Women in Ancient Egypt owned and had complete control over both movable and immovable property, such as real estate in 3000 BC. As late as the 1960s, this right could not be claimed by women in some parts of the United States. A close look at Ancient Egyptian papyrus' reveals that society was strictly matrilinial and inheritance and descent was through the female line. The Egyptian woman enjoyed the same legal and economic rights as the Egyptian man, and the proof of this is reflected in Egyptian art and historical inscriptions. Egypt was an unequal society, but the inequality was based much more upon differences in the social classes, rather than differences in gender. From ancient legal documents, we know that women were able to manage and dispose of private property, including land, portable goods, servants, livestock, and financial instruments such as endowments and annuities. A woman could administer all her property independently and according to her free will and in several excavated cemeteries the richest tombs were those of women. The independence and leadership roles of Ancient Egyptian women are part of an African cultural pattern that began millennia ago and continued into recent times, until Europeans brought colonial Christianity to Africa. In the 1860s, the colonial explorer and Christian missionary, Dr David Livingstone, wrote of meeting female chiefs in the Congo, and in most of the monarchical systems of traditional Africa, there were either one or two women of the highest rank who occupied a position at par with that of the king or complementary to it. Professor of Ancient African History, Barbara Lesko, illustrates how anthropologists who have studied African history and records of early travellers and missionaries tell us, "everywhere in Africa that one scrapes the surface one finds ethno-historical data on the authority once shared by women". chakabars

Pre-capitalist, matriarchal civilisations in Africa included the Nigerian Zazzau, Sudanese Kandake, Angolan Nzinga, and Ashanti of Ghana, to...

God, Ignorant, and Love: HE WO MAN FE MALE HU MAN PER SON visual-poetry »swofehuper« by richard tipping [via] mitosisisyourtosis men fabricated the idea that they are the default sex to compensate for their biological inferiority and general superfluousness this is not just the "natural order this is the language of a patriarchal culture rhysiare Omg no, you are wrong on so many levels and as a linguist this makes me ache something terrible. In my linguistics class in undergrad, we actually made fun of people who think like you along these lines and for good reason because you are wholly ignorant and are choosing to spin narratives about things and fields which you know completely nothing about yet pretend you do 1. She: This word evolved naturally from Old English from seo/heo which were just words to refer to feminine-female people evolving from Proto- Germanic words meaning that/there. He as a word evolved from the same ideas but Proto-Germanic words for "this/here'. Your idea of patriarchal language" further falls apart when you compare this part of English to other Germanic languages, of which English is related, the words in German for he and she are "er" and "sie", completely unrelated So it is by clear happenstance, not some patriarchal conspiracy that the words "he" and "she" n English have similar form. 2. Woman: Oh god this one always gets my goat when people go for this one. Man did not used to mean "male", man used to mean humanity human being the old words in Old English for male adult person and female adult person were erman" and "wifman" respectively, we can see this relation in words like werewolf and wife as being the remnants of the base "wer and the base "wif- Woman evolved phonologically from the word "wifman" by natural processes where the "f sound dropped and the 'i' became lax. Man dropped its "wer stem for reasons mostly unknown but l can guarantee have nothing to do with patriarchy" because phonological change has no basis in that 3. Female: Male and Female actually come etymologically from two completely different words. Male comes from Old French masle" which meant masculine, while Female came from Old French as well "femella" which meant young woman. This is another case, just like he and she where the words coincidentally ended up looking similar without having any direct correlation in historical linguistic processes to make them as such 4. Human: This word etymologically derives from Proto-Indo- European "ghomon" which means earthly being as opposed to heavenly being which would refer to gods. You have some small glimmer of hope here in that the word does eventually branch off into the word for "man" in some languages but this is still too small of a precedent to base any conspiratorial thinking like you are doing off of 5. Person: This one offends me the most, simply because love the fuck out of Etruscan language and your continued ignorance just irks me at this point. Person derives from persona" from Latin which meant the same meaning, which ultimately derived from phersu" Etruscan for mask' as Etruscans would often have theatre performers use masks to give identity to the performers. So never once did "person" have any meaning to do with son". So yes, this is the natural order or language. Please never proselytise your faulty ideology and misandrist thinking within speaking about word origins and morphology again, as unless you actually do fact checking, l will school the everloving hell out of you, stay in your lane. Someone call the police, I've just seen some shots fired
God, Ignorant, and Love: HE
 WO MAN
 FE
 MALE
 HU
 MAN
 PER
 SON
 visual-poetry
 »swofehuper« by richard tipping
 [via]
 mitosisisyourtosis
 men fabricated the idea that they are the default sex to compensate for their
 biological inferiority and general superfluousness
 this is not just the "natural order this is the language of a patriarchal culture

 rhysiare
 Omg no, you are wrong on so many levels and as a linguist this makes me
 ache something terrible. In my linguistics class in undergrad, we actually made
 fun of people who think like you along these lines and for good reason
 because you are wholly ignorant and are choosing to spin narratives about
 things and fields which you know completely nothing about yet pretend you do
 1. She: This word evolved naturally from Old English from seo/heo which
 were just words to refer to feminine-female people evolving from Proto-
 Germanic words meaning that/there. He as a word evolved from the
 same ideas but Proto-Germanic words for "this/here'. Your idea of
 patriarchal language" further falls apart when you compare this part of
 English to other Germanic languages, of which English is related, the
 words in German for he and she are "er" and "sie", completely unrelated
 So it is by clear happenstance, not some patriarchal conspiracy that the
 words "he" and "she" n English have similar form.
 2. Woman: Oh god this one always gets my goat when people go for this
 one. Man did not used to mean "male", man used to
 mean humanity human being the old words in
 Old English for male
 adult person and female adult person were erman" and "wifman"
 respectively, we can see this relation in words like werewolf and wife as
 being the remnants of the base "wer
 and the base "wif- Woman
 evolved phonologically from the word "wifman" by natural processes
 where the "f sound dropped and the
 'i' became lax. Man dropped
 its "wer stem for reasons mostly unknown but l can guarantee have
 nothing to do with patriarchy" because phonological change has no
 basis in that
 3. Female: Male and Female actually come etymologically from two
 completely different words. Male comes from Old French masle" which
 meant masculine, while Female came from Old French as well "femella"
 which meant young woman. This is another case, just like he and she
 where the words coincidentally ended up looking similar without having
 any direct correlation in historical
 linguistic processes to make them as
 such

 4. Human: This word etymologically derives from Proto-Indo-
 European "ghomon" which means earthly being as opposed to heavenly
 being which would refer to gods. You have some small glimmer of hope
 here in that the word does eventually branch off into the word for "man"
 in some languages but this is still too small of a precedent to base any
 conspiratorial thinking like you are doing off of
 5. Person: This one offends me the most, simply because
 love the fuck
 out of Etruscan language and your continued ignorance just irks me at
 this point. Person derives from persona" from Latin which meant the
 same meaning, which ultimately derived from phersu" Etruscan
 for mask' as Etruscans would often have theatre performers use masks
 to give identity to the performers. So never once did "person" have any
 meaning to do with son". So yes, this is the natural order or language.
 Please never proselytise your faulty ideology and misandrist thinking within
 speaking about word origins and morphology again, as unless you actually do
 fact checking, l will school the everloving hell out of you, stay in your lane.
Someone call the police, I've just seen some shots fired

Someone call the police, I've just seen some shots fired

Memes, The Division, and Wired: HAVEAMERICANS ALREADY FORGOTTEN THE FREETHOUGHTPROJEGT GOMM HOW THE LAST WALLTURNED OUT? 💭 ‘Mr President, don’t build this wall!’: Berlin’s mayor urges Trump to learn from History 💭 REPORT: Berlin Mayor Michael Müller has just sent President Donald Trump a message about his proposed Mexican border wall. As the mayor of the iconic German city that was divided by an imposing wall for almost three decades, Muller is in good position to offer advice. . “Berlin, the city of the division of Europe, the city of freedom of Europe, cannot look without comment when a country plans to build a new wall,” Müller said in a statement Friday. “We Berliners know best how much suffering a division of an entire continent, cemented by barbed wire and wall, has caused. Millions of people have been seized by this division of life. In the end, we, the people, have overcome this division, and it is one of the 20th century’s star-studded hours when, at the Brandenburger Tor, the most important symbol of the division, people conquered the Wall and then removed them piece by piece. The Brandenburg Gate stands for the spirit of freedom!” . “Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, we cannot simply accept it if all our historical experiences are thrown over by those to whom we largely owe our freedom, the Americans,” Müller’s statement continued. “I appeal to the President of the United States not to go this way of foreclosure and exclusion. Wherever such borders still exist today in Korea, in Cyprus, they create unfreedom and suffering.” . Müller ended his statement with a reminder of the words of US President Ronald Reagan, who in 1987 called on Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to take down the Berlin Wall. “Remember his words: ‘Tear down this wall,’”Müller said. “And so I say: Dear Mr. President, don’t build this wall!” . - Continued - . 💭 Read the FULL Report: http:-thefreethoughtproject.com-berlins-mayor-urges-trump-learn-history-wall- 💭 Join Us: @TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 LIKE our Facebook page & Visit our website for more News and Information. Link in Bio.... 💭 www.TheFreeThoughtProject.com
Memes, The Division, and Wired: HAVEAMERICANS ALREADY FORGOTTEN
 THE FREETHOUGHTPROJEGT
 GOMM
 HOW THE LAST WALLTURNED OUT?
💭 ‘Mr President, don’t build this wall!’: Berlin’s mayor urges Trump to learn from History 💭 REPORT: Berlin Mayor Michael Müller has just sent President Donald Trump a message about his proposed Mexican border wall. As the mayor of the iconic German city that was divided by an imposing wall for almost three decades, Muller is in good position to offer advice. . “Berlin, the city of the division of Europe, the city of freedom of Europe, cannot look without comment when a country plans to build a new wall,” Müller said in a statement Friday. “We Berliners know best how much suffering a division of an entire continent, cemented by barbed wire and wall, has caused. Millions of people have been seized by this division of life. In the end, we, the people, have overcome this division, and it is one of the 20th century’s star-studded hours when, at the Brandenburger Tor, the most important symbol of the division, people conquered the Wall and then removed them piece by piece. The Brandenburg Gate stands for the spirit of freedom!” . “Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, we cannot simply accept it if all our historical experiences are thrown over by those to whom we largely owe our freedom, the Americans,” Müller’s statement continued. “I appeal to the President of the United States not to go this way of foreclosure and exclusion. Wherever such borders still exist today in Korea, in Cyprus, they create unfreedom and suffering.” . Müller ended his statement with a reminder of the words of US President Ronald Reagan, who in 1987 called on Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to take down the Berlin Wall. “Remember his words: ‘Tear down this wall,’”Müller said. “And so I say: Dear Mr. President, don’t build this wall!” . - Continued - . 💭 Read the FULL Report: http:-thefreethoughtproject.com-berlins-mayor-urges-trump-learn-history-wall- 💭 Join Us: @TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 TheFreeThoughtProject 💭 LIKE our Facebook page & Visit our website for more News and Information. Link in Bio.... 💭 www.TheFreeThoughtProject.com

💭 ‘Mr President, don’t build this wall!’: Berlin’s mayor urges Trump to learn from History 💭 REPORT: Berlin Mayor Michael Müller has just se...