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incisive: "I like people with depth. I like those who have deep thoughts, fierce passions, dreams, goals, and ambition." What is this life, did I ask to be born here, in this place, at this time. I came here out of the ether, my being materialised through time, a biological process we call it creation. I forget to mention that time is a concept, so is existence. They say I think therefore I am, but am I really here? I'll let you know when I know I'm dead. Are we living lives devoid of spiritually, apathetic mentalities, perpetuating pathetic municipalities, economic realities breeding nothing but fatalities. I have been put here to change this system of living, more than a project page on justgiving, for those who vote away decision, sieving permission to those on a mission & make sure petitions remain a prescription, for hypothetical incisions in political contradiction. They are not right those who we have put in charge, these bloated psychopaths, need bloodbaths, & big gaffs, we kiss ass, they teach more mathematics that they made up, it's time we start fixing up. They steal from us the working people, I feel we have a love for evil. We ask them to control how we exist, by giving away power are you taking from this, the Forbes list should be dismissed, yet we still deify financial bliss. Don't be hopeless, or hope they notice, take back ownership of life we owe this, to all the mothers with starving children, for all those who slave their own occupied lands, while business tycoons rake in thousands of grands, for all the congolese who had severed hands, all women whose vaginas were sold on demand, & for all lives that became bodies sold for their organs, while Rockefellers murdered some poor souls out of boredom. We owe this to ourselves, so spread this message by word of mouth, this planet is nearly finished with, the rich, & we have diminished it. Some will turn their backs trying not to receive it, living a material dream but having to be asleep to believe it. Have I not made myself clear, or you don't care for reality, living in fear, are you going to remove carbon from our atmosphere, or move to a planet in a galaxy near? It's clear the end is near. So present your presence like permanent presents, so the foreseeable future never forgets favour over fortune, because our
incisive: "I like people with depth. I like those
 who have deep thoughts, fierce
 passions, dreams, goals, and ambition."
What is this life, did I ask to be born here, in this place, at this time. I came here out of the ether, my being materialised through time, a biological process we call it creation. I forget to mention that time is a concept, so is existence. They say I think therefore I am, but am I really here? I'll let you know when I know I'm dead. Are we living lives devoid of spiritually, apathetic mentalities, perpetuating pathetic municipalities, economic realities breeding nothing but fatalities. I have been put here to change this system of living, more than a project page on justgiving, for those who vote away decision, sieving permission to those on a mission & make sure petitions remain a prescription, for hypothetical incisions in political contradiction. They are not right those who we have put in charge, these bloated psychopaths, need bloodbaths, & big gaffs, we kiss ass, they teach more mathematics that they made up, it's time we start fixing up. They steal from us the working people, I feel we have a love for evil. We ask them to control how we exist, by giving away power are you taking from this, the Forbes list should be dismissed, yet we still deify financial bliss. Don't be hopeless, or hope they notice, take back ownership of life we owe this, to all the mothers with starving children, for all those who slave their own occupied lands, while business tycoons rake in thousands of grands, for all the congolese who had severed hands, all women whose vaginas were sold on demand, & for all lives that became bodies sold for their organs, while Rockefellers murdered some poor souls out of boredom. We owe this to ourselves, so spread this message by word of mouth, this planet is nearly finished with, the rich, & we have diminished it. Some will turn their backs trying not to receive it, living a material dream but having to be asleep to believe it. Have I not made myself clear, or you don't care for reality, living in fear, are you going to remove carbon from our atmosphere, or move to a planet in a galaxy near? It's clear the end is near. So present your presence like permanent presents, so the foreseeable future never forgets favour over fortune, because our

What is this life, did I ask to be born here, in this place, at this time. I came here out of the ether, my being materialised through ti...

incisive: pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core. To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure. The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across. Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming. Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images. Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) For more information visit our webpage here
incisive: pictures-of-space:



The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy
NASA image release January 13, 2011
In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.
To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.
The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.
Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.
Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.
Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).
Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)


For more information visit our webpage here

pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has bee...

incisive: pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core. To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure. The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across. Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming. Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images. Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
incisive: pictures-of-space:



The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy
NASA image release January 13, 2011
In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.
To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.
The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.
Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.
Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.
Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).
Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has bee...

incisive: pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core. To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure. The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across. Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming. Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images. Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
incisive: pictures-of-space:



The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy
NASA image release January 13, 2011
In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.
To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.
The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.
Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.
Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.
Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).
Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has bee...

incisive: pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core. To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure. The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across. Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming. Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images. Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
incisive: pictures-of-space:



The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy
NASA image release January 13, 2011
In the image here, most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.
To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.
The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.
Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.
Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.
Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).
Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

pictures-of-space: The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy NASA image release January 13, 2011 In the image here, most of the starlight has bee...

incisive: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://pictures-of-space.tumblr.com/post/146479533684">pictures-of-space</a>:</p> <blockquote> <h2> The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy</h2> <p>NASA image release January 13, 2011</p> <p><b>In the image here,</b> most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.</p> <p>To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.</p> <p>The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.</p> <p>Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.</p> <p>Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.</p> <p>Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).</p> <p>Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)</p> </blockquote>
incisive: <p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://pictures-of-space.tumblr.com/post/146479533684">pictures-of-space</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<h2>

The Two-faced Whirlpool Galaxy</h2>
<p>NASA image release January 13, 2011</p>
<p><b>In the image here,</b> most of the starlight has been removed, revealing the Whirlpool’s skeletal dust structure, as seen in near-infrared light. This new image is the sharpest view of the dense dust in M51. The narrow lanes of dust revealed by Hubble reflect the galaxy’s moniker, the Whirlpool Galaxy, as if they were swirling toward the galaxy’s core.</p>
<p>To map the galaxy’s dust structure, researchers collected the galaxy’s starlight by combining images taken in visible and near-infrared light. The visible-light image captured only some of the light; the rest was obscured by dust. The near-infrared view, however, revealed more starlight because near-infrared light penetrates dust. The researchers then subtracted the total amount of starlight from both images to see the galaxy’s dust structure.</p>
<p>The red color in the near-infrared image traces the dust, which is punctuated by hundreds of tiny clumps of stars, each about 65 light-years wide. These stars have never been seen before. The star clusters cannot be seen in visible light because dense dust enshrouds them. The image reveals details as small as 35 light-years across.</p>
<p>Astronomers expected to see large dust clouds, ranging from about 100 light-years to more than 300 light-years wide. Instead, most of the dust is tied up in smooth and diffuse dust lanes. An encounter with another galaxy may have prevented giant clouds from forming.</p>
<p>Probing a galaxy’s dust structure serves as an important diagnostic tool for astronomers, providing invaluable information on how the gas and dust collapse to form stars. Although Hubble is providing incisive views of the internal structure of galaxies such as M51, the planned James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to produce even crisper images.</p>
<p>Researchers constructed the image by combining visible-light exposures from Jan. 18 to 22, 2005, with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and near-infrared light pictures taken in December 2005 with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS).</p>
<p>Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)</p>
</blockquote>

<p><a class="tumblr_blog" href="http://pictures-of-space.tumblr.com/post/146479533684">pictures-of-space</a>:</p> <blockquote> <h2> The...

incisive: GASTONIA MAIN 5050 9100 070 681 7 POS T M DER N R EDERICK CRE W S AUTHOR OF THE POOH PERPLEX U.S.A. $22.00 Canado $35.00 Nearly forty years ago, a young literary scholar by the name of Frederick Crews had an inspired idea: to portray his trendsetting peers in the act of applying their critical acumen to the adventures of that deceptively simpleminded teddy bear of story- book fame, Winnie-the-Pooh. In incisive chapters entitled "A Bourgeois Writer's Proletarian Fables," "A la recherche du Pooh perdu," and so forth, Freudian and Marxist, New Critic and Neo- Aristotelian alike had at the Pooh texts, dredging up their hidden layers of meaning for the enlight- enment of the hitherto unsuspecting reader. The Pooh Perplex became a bestseller, a "must" read discussed at sherry-and-cheese gatherings from coast to coast. Now Winnie-the-Pooh is three-quarters of a century old-and, alas, Professor Crews lags not far behind. Thanks, however, to the efforts of Princeton's superstar professor N. Mack Hobbs, Crews has been coaxed out of retirement long enough to lend his blessing and his name to a project undertaken in homage to his own-a panel on Pooh convened at the December 2000 Modern Language Association convention irn Washington, D.C., at which the leading lights of contemporary criticism were invited to train their wits upon the beloved bear. Radical feminist Sisera Catheter, Lacanian postcolonialist Das Nuffa Dat, and trailblazing proponents of Deconstruction, Poststructuralist Marxism, New Historicism, Biopoetics, Cultural Studies, and-let (continued on back flap) (continued from front flap) us not forget-recovered memory theory all took their turns at the podium and their shots at dear Edward Bear, leaving no ammunition in the arsenal of contemporary literary hermeneutics unexploded. Here, then, are the published pro- ceedings of this remarkable event, for the edifica- tion (and delectation) of a new generation of readers. FREDERICK CREWS is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Berkeley. <p>What is this nightmarish thing I found at the library?</p>
incisive: GASTONIA MAIN
 5050 9100 070 681 7
 POS T M
 DER N
 R EDERICK CRE W S
 AUTHOR OF THE POOH PERPLEX

 U.S.A. $22.00
 Canado $35.00
 Nearly forty years ago, a young literary scholar by
 the name of Frederick Crews had an inspired
 idea: to portray his trendsetting peers in the act of
 applying their critical acumen to the adventures of
 that deceptively simpleminded teddy bear of story-
 book fame, Winnie-the-Pooh. In incisive chapters
 entitled "A Bourgeois Writer's Proletarian Fables,"
 "A la recherche du Pooh perdu," and so forth,
 Freudian and Marxist, New Critic and Neo-
 Aristotelian alike had at the Pooh texts, dredging
 up their hidden layers of meaning for the enlight-
 enment of the hitherto unsuspecting reader. The
 Pooh Perplex became a bestseller, a "must" read
 discussed at sherry-and-cheese gatherings from
 coast to coast.
 Now Winnie-the-Pooh is three-quarters of a
 century old-and, alas, Professor Crews lags not
 far behind. Thanks, however, to the efforts of
 Princeton's superstar professor N. Mack Hobbs,
 Crews has been coaxed out of retirement long
 enough to lend his blessing and his name to a
 project undertaken in homage to his own-a
 panel on Pooh convened at the December 2000
 Modern Language Association convention irn
 Washington, D.C., at which the leading lights of
 contemporary criticism were invited to train their
 wits upon the beloved bear. Radical feminist
 Sisera Catheter, Lacanian postcolonialist Das
 Nuffa Dat, and trailblazing proponents of
 Deconstruction, Poststructuralist Marxism, New
 Historicism, Biopoetics, Cultural Studies, and-let
 (continued on back flap)

 (continued from front flap)
 us not forget-recovered memory theory all took
 their turns at the podium and their shots at
 dear Edward Bear, leaving no ammunition in the
 arsenal of contemporary literary hermeneutics
 unexploded. Here, then, are the published pro-
 ceedings of this remarkable event, for the edifica-
 tion (and delectation) of a new generation of
 readers.
 FREDERICK CREWS is Professor
 Emeritus of English at the University of California,
 Berkeley.
<p>What is this nightmarish thing I found at the library?</p>

<p>What is this nightmarish thing I found at the library?</p>