🔥 | Latest

inclusion: Tim Doyle- print shop owner person. NakatomiTim When people say they just want 'good stories' and no politics or 'SJW issues in their entertainment-what they are saying is that when they were kids, they completely missed the subtext of every story, movie, comic book, etc they took in. These stories have always been political Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v Star Trek, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, X-Men, Wonder Woman, on and on and orn these are Political / 'SJW' stories. And the message, if you were paying attention at all is one of inclusion, deep compassion for your fellow man, and social justice 3 139 546 Tim Dovle-print shop owner per... 12h So if you look at say, Ms. Marvel, The Last Jedi, Black Panther, or whatever and say- "I just want stories like when was a kid, get these politics outta my face!" The truth is- you weren't a very observant kid. And you grew into a stunted adult. You missed something vital 4 t 246 876 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... '12h v Superman is a story of an immigrant coming to America, and we're all stronger by him being here. Spider-Man is about using your power to benefit everyone, not just yourself. Star Wars is anti-authoritarian, Star Trek is a socialist utopia driven by exploration and science 7 T,112 538 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... .12h Harry Potter is about racism, and the idea of 'genetic superiority', and the insane idea of being better than someone else by the virtue of your birth These ideas are not even subtext- they're right in your damn face, if you bother to open your eyes 2 1376 464 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v If anyone ever tells you that these new stories & movies have 'forced diversity or are pushing "Liberal Agendas"-what they are telling you is they missed everything about what made the stories they do like- great. adora721: yayfeminism: 👏🏻 Just cause it needs to be reblogged.
inclusion: Tim Doyle- print shop owner person.
 NakatomiTim
 When people say they just want 'good
 stories' and no politics or 'SJW issues in
 their entertainment-what they are
 saying is that when they were kids, they
 completely missed the subtext of every
 story, movie, comic book, etc they took
 in. These stories have always been
 political

 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v
 Star Trek, Star Wars, Harry Potter,
 Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, X-Men,
 Wonder Woman, on and on and orn
 these are Political / 'SJW' stories. And
 the message, if you were paying
 attention at all is one of inclusion, deep
 compassion for your fellow man, and
 social justice
 3
 139
 546
 Tim Dovle-print shop owner per... 12h
 So if you look at say, Ms. Marvel, The
 Last Jedi, Black Panther, or whatever
 and say- "I just want stories like when
 was a kid, get these politics outta my
 face!" The truth is- you weren't a very
 observant kid. And you grew into a
 stunted adult. You missed something
 vital
 4
 t 246
 876

 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... '12h v
 Superman is a story of an immigrant
 coming to America, and we're all
 stronger by him being here. Spider-Man
 is about using your power to benefit
 everyone, not just yourself. Star Wars is
 anti-authoritarian, Star Trek is a socialist
 utopia driven by exploration and science
 7
 T,112
 538
 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... .12h
 Harry Potter is about racism, and the
 idea of 'genetic superiority', and the
 insane idea of being better than
 someone else by the virtue of your birth
 These ideas are not even subtext-
 they're right in your damn face, if you
 bother to open your eyes
 2
 1376
 464
 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v
 If anyone ever tells you that these new
 stories & movies have 'forced diversity
 or are pushing "Liberal Agendas"-what
 they are telling you is they missed
 everything about what made the stories
 they do like- great.
adora721:
yayfeminism:
👏🏻
Just cause it needs to be reblogged.

adora721: yayfeminism: 👏🏻 Just cause it needs to be reblogged.

inclusion: Tim Doyle- print shop owner person. NakatomiTim When people say they just want 'good stories' and no politics or 'SJW issues in their entertainment-what they are saying is that when they were kids, they completely missed the subtext of every story, movie, comic book, etc they took in. These stories have always been political Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v Star Trek, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, X-Men, Wonder Woman, on and on and orn these are Political / 'SJW' stories. And the message, if you were paying attention at all is one of inclusion, deep compassion for your fellow man, and social justice 3 139 546 Tim Dovle-print shop owner per... 12h So if you look at say, Ms. Marvel, The Last Jedi, Black Panther, or whatever and say- "I just want stories like when was a kid, get these politics outta my face!" The truth is- you weren't a very observant kid. And you grew into a stunted adult. You missed something vital 4 t 246 876 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... '12h v Superman is a story of an immigrant coming to America, and we're all stronger by him being here. Spider-Man is about using your power to benefit everyone, not just yourself. Star Wars is anti-authoritarian, Star Trek is a socialist utopia driven by exploration and science 7 T,112 538 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... .12h Harry Potter is about racism, and the idea of 'genetic superiority', and the insane idea of being better than someone else by the virtue of your birth These ideas are not even subtext- they're right in your damn face, if you bother to open your eyes 2 1376 464 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v If anyone ever tells you that these new stories & movies have 'forced diversity or are pushing "Liberal Agendas"-what they are telling you is they missed everything about what made the stories they do like- great. yayfeminism: 👏🏻
inclusion: Tim Doyle- print shop owner person.
 NakatomiTim
 When people say they just want 'good
 stories' and no politics or 'SJW issues in
 their entertainment-what they are
 saying is that when they were kids, they
 completely missed the subtext of every
 story, movie, comic book, etc they took
 in. These stories have always been
 political

 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v
 Star Trek, Star Wars, Harry Potter,
 Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, X-Men,
 Wonder Woman, on and on and orn
 these are Political / 'SJW' stories. And
 the message, if you were paying
 attention at all is one of inclusion, deep
 compassion for your fellow man, and
 social justice
 3
 139
 546
 Tim Dovle-print shop owner per... 12h
 So if you look at say, Ms. Marvel, The
 Last Jedi, Black Panther, or whatever
 and say- "I just want stories like when
 was a kid, get these politics outta my
 face!" The truth is- you weren't a very
 observant kid. And you grew into a
 stunted adult. You missed something
 vital
 4
 t 246
 876

 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... '12h v
 Superman is a story of an immigrant
 coming to America, and we're all
 stronger by him being here. Spider-Man
 is about using your power to benefit
 everyone, not just yourself. Star Wars is
 anti-authoritarian, Star Trek is a socialist
 utopia driven by exploration and science
 7
 T,112
 538
 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... .12h
 Harry Potter is about racism, and the
 idea of 'genetic superiority', and the
 insane idea of being better than
 someone else by the virtue of your birth
 These ideas are not even subtext-
 they're right in your damn face, if you
 bother to open your eyes
 2
 1376
 464
 Tim Doyle- print shop owner per... 12h v
 If anyone ever tells you that these new
 stories & movies have 'forced diversity
 or are pushing "Liberal Agendas"-what
 they are telling you is they missed
 everything about what made the stories
 they do like- great.
yayfeminism:
👏🏻

yayfeminism: 👏🏻

inclusion: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p> </blockquote> <p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p> </blockquote> <p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p> <p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ using an outdated term for transgender people is “<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad “<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p> <p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p> <p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p> <p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p> <p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender “<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“ I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity “<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad. “<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“ It’s not going to kill you “<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“ It’s not that hard a concept to understand. “<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote> <p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>
inclusion: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p>
</blockquote>

<p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p>
<p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
using an outdated term for transgender people is

“<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p>
</blockquote>

<p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p>
<p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p>
<p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p>
<p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p>
<p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender

“<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“
I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity

“<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad.

“<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“
 It’s not going to kill you

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“
It’s not that hard a concept to understand. 

“<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote>

<p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote>

<p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>

<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:...

inclusion: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
inclusion: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>

<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his...

inclusion: T. Lee @curvegawdess Following This is kinda the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. WHY WASNT THERE ANY LIGHTER SKIN BLACK WOMEN IN WAKANDA? CHICAGO DC A. 7:26 AM-24 Feb 2018 from Florida, USA 1,601 Retweets 4,436 Likes Alice. @CoffeeCreamGirl Follow Well to answer the question, Wakanda was uncolonized meaning there were no slaves being raped by owners to create light skinned citizens. Dark people reproducing with each other creates more Dark people usually, any other questions or can we enjoy the movie in peace now? T. Lee @curvegawdess This is kinda the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. Show this thread 11:30 AM-24 Feb 2018 958 Retweets 15,281 Likes Alice. @CoffeeCreamGirl Follow I said the word usually for inclusion of things like genetic mutations and diicereni geographic: clirns. Period point blank it'd be a rarity it's not suppose to blatantly stand out 5:00 PM- 24 Feb 2018 <p><a href="https://whyyoustabbedme.tumblr.com/post/171275993402/lets-not-forget-that-lighter-people-arealways" class="tumblr_blog">whyyoustabbedme</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Let’s not forget that lighter people are/always have had more representation in movies so there’s really no reason to be pressed.</p><figure data-orig-height="200" data-orig-width="272"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ccc524a144963cb5e5877e21a6b1a934/tumblr_inline_p4pumamigq1vrw6x9_540.gif" data-orig-height="200" data-orig-width="272"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Is anyone on earth capable of just enjoying things anymore?</p>
inclusion: T. Lee
 @curvegawdess
 Following
 This is kinda the most ridiculous thing
 I've ever seen.
 WHY WASNT THERE ANY LIGHTER
 SKIN BLACK WOMEN IN WAKANDA?
 CHICAGO
 DC
 A.
 7:26 AM-24 Feb 2018 from Florida, USA
 1,601 Retweets 4,436 Likes

 Alice.
 @CoffeeCreamGirl
 Follow
 Well to answer the question, Wakanda
 was uncolonized meaning there were no
 slaves being raped by owners to create
 light skinned citizens. Dark people
 reproducing with each other creates
 more Dark people usually, any other
 questions or can we enjoy the movie in
 peace now?
 T. Lee @curvegawdess
 This is kinda the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen.
 Show this thread
 11:30 AM-24 Feb 2018
 958 Retweets 15,281 Likes

 Alice.
 @CoffeeCreamGirl
 Follow
 I said the word usually for inclusion of
 things like genetic mutations and
 diicereni geographic: clirns. Period
 point blank it'd be a rarity it's not
 suppose to blatantly stand out
 5:00 PM- 24 Feb 2018
<p><a href="https://whyyoustabbedme.tumblr.com/post/171275993402/lets-not-forget-that-lighter-people-arealways" class="tumblr_blog">whyyoustabbedme</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Let’s not forget that lighter people are/always have had more representation in movies so there’s really no reason to be pressed.</p><figure data-orig-height="200" data-orig-width="272"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ccc524a144963cb5e5877e21a6b1a934/tumblr_inline_p4pumamigq1vrw6x9_540.gif" data-orig-height="200" data-orig-width="272"/></figure></blockquote>

<p>Is anyone on earth capable of just enjoying things anymore?</p>

<p><a href="https://whyyoustabbedme.tumblr.com/post/171275993402/lets-not-forget-that-lighter-people-arealways" class="tumblr_blog">whyyo...

inclusion: rgfellows: rgfellows: kanyewestboro: calanoida: Susanna and the Elders, Restored (Left) Susanna and the Elders, Restored with X-ray (Right) Kathleen Gilje, 1998 wow Oooh my gosh this is rad. This is so rad. For those who don’t know about this painting, the artist was the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi. Gentileschi was a female painter in a time when it was very largely unheard of for a woman to be an artist. She managed to get the opportunity for training and eventual employment because her father, Orazio, was already a well established master painter who was very adamant that she get artistic training. He apparently saw a high degree of skill in some artwork she did as a hobby in childhood. He was very supportive of her and encouraged her to resist the “traditional attitude and psychological submission to brainwashing and the jealousy of her obvious talents.”   Gentileschi became extremely well known in her time for painting female figures from the Bible and their suffering. For example, the one seen above depicts the story from the Book of Daniel. Susanna is bathing in her garden when two elders began to spy on her in the nude. As she finishes they stop her and tell her that they will tell everyone that they saw her have an affair with a young man (she’s married so this is an offense punishable by death) unless she has sex with them. She refuses, they tell their tale, and she is going to be put to death when the protagonist of the book (Daniel) stops them. So that painting above? That was her first major painting. She was SEVENTEEN-YEARS-OLD. For context, here is a painting of the same story by Alessandro Allori made just four years earlier in 1606:  Wowwwww. That does not look like a woman being threatened with a choice between death or rape. So imagine 17 year old Artemisia trying to approach painting the scene of a woman being assaulted. And she paints what is seen in the x-ray above. A woman in horrifying, grotesque anguish with what appears to be a knife poised in her clenched hand. Damn that shit is real. Who wants to guess that she was advised by, perhaps her father or others, to tone it down. Women can’t look that grotesque. Sexual assault can’t be depicted as that horrifying. And women definitely can’t be seen as having the potential to fight back. Certainly not in artwork. Women need to be soft. They need to wilt from their captors but still look pretty and be a damsel in distress. So she changed it.  What’s interesting to note is that she eventually painted and stuck with some of her own, less traditional depictions of women. However, that is more interesting with some context.   (Warning for reference to rape, torture, and images of paintings which show violence and blood.) So, Gentileschi’s story continues in the very next year, 1611, when her father hires Agostino Tassi, an artist, to privately tutor her. It was in this time when Tassi raped her. He then proceeded to promise that he would marry her. He pointed out that if it got out that she had lost her virginity to a man she wasn’t going to marry then it would ruin her. Using this, he emotionally manipulated her into continuing a sexual relationship with him. However, he then proceeded to marry someone else. Horrified at this turn of events she went to her father. Orazio was having none of this shit and took Tassi to court. At that time, rape wasn’t technically an offense to warrant a trial, but the fact that he had taken her virginity (and therefore technically “damaged Orazio’s property”. ugh.) meant that the trial went along. It lasted for 7 months. During this time, to prove the truth of her words, Artemisia was given invasive gynecological examinations and was even questioned while being subjected to torture via thumb screws. It was also discovered during the trial that Tassi was planning to kill his current wife, have an affair with her sister, and steal a number of Orazio’s paintings. Tassi was found guilty and was given a prison sentence of…. ONE. YEAR……. Which he never even served because the verdict was annulled. During this time and a bit after (1611-1612), Artemisia painted her most famous work of Judith Slaying Holofernes. This bible story involved Holofernes, an Assyrian general, leading troops to invade and destroy Bethulia, the home of Judith. Judith decides to deal with this issue by coming to him, flirting with him to get his guard down, and then plying him with food and lots of wine. When he passed out, Judith and her handmaiden took his sword and cut his head off. Issue averted. The subject was a very popular one for art at the time. Here is a version of the scene painted in 1598-99 by Carivaggio, whom was a great stylistic influence on Artemisia: This depiction is a pretty good example of how this scene was typically depicted. Artists usually went out of their way to show Judith committing the act (or having committed it) while trying to detach her from the actual violence of it. In this way, they could avoid her losing the morality of her character and also avoid showing a woman committing such aggression. So here we see a young, rather delicate looking Judith in a pure white dress. She is daintily holding down this massive man and looks rather disgusted and upset at having to do this. Now, here is Artemisia’s: Damn. Thats a whole different scene. Here Holofernes looks less like he’s simply surprised by the goings ons and more like a man choking on his own blood and struggling fruitlessly against his captors. The blood here is less of a bright red than in Carrivaggio’s but is somehow more sickening. It feels more real, and gushes in a much less stylized way than Carrivaggio’s. Not to mention, Judith here is far from removed from the violence. She is putting her physical weight into this act. Her hands (much stronger looking than most depictions of women’s hands in early artwork) are working hard. Her face, as well, is completely different. She doesn’t look upset, necessarily, but more determined.  It’s also worth note that the handmaiden is now involved in the action. It’s worth note because, during her rape trial, Artemisia stated that she had cried for help during the initial rape. Specifically she had called for Tassi’s female tenant in the building, Tuzia. Tuzia not only ignored her cries for help, but she also denied the whole happening. Tuzia had been a friend of Artemisia’s and in fact was one of her only female friends. Artemisia felt extremely betrayed, but rather than turning her against her own gender, this event instilled in her the deep importance of female relationships and solidarity among women. This can be seen in some of her artwork, and I believe in the one above, as well, with the inclusion of the handmaiden in the act. So, I just added a million words worth of information dump on a post when no one asked me, but there we go. I could talk for ages about Artemisia as a person and her depictions of women (even beyond what I wrote above. Don’t get me started on her depictions of female nudes in comparison to how male artists painted nude women at the time.)  To sum up: Artemisia Gentileschi is rad as hell. This x-ray is also rad as hell and makes her even radder. I love art history. I’m reblogging this again to add something that I also think is important to know about Artemisia Gentileschi.Back in her time and through even to TODAY, there are people who argue that her artworks were greatly aided by her father…. As in he either helped her paint them or just straight up painted them himself. Hell, there are a number of works only recently (past several years or so) that have been officially attributed to Artemisia because people originally saw the signature with “Gentileschi” in it and automatically attributed it to Orazio.So, not only was Artemisia Gentileschi an amazing artist and amazing historical figure, but I don’t want it to be ignored that there are people over 400 years later who still won’t give her the credit she deserves, just because she’s a woman and obviously women can’t paint like she did.
inclusion: rgfellows:
rgfellows:


kanyewestboro:

calanoida:

Susanna and the Elders, Restored (Left)
Susanna and the Elders, Restored with X-ray (Right)
Kathleen Gilje, 1998

wow

Oooh my gosh this is rad. This is so rad.
For those who don’t know about this painting, the artist was the Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi.
Gentileschi was a female painter in a time when it was very largely unheard of for a woman to be an artist. She managed to get the opportunity for training and eventual employment because her father, Orazio, was already a well established master painter who was very adamant that she get artistic training. He apparently saw a high degree of skill in some artwork she did as a hobby in childhood. He was very supportive of her and encouraged her to resist the “traditional attitude and psychological submission to brainwashing and the jealousy of her obvious talents.”  
Gentileschi became extremely well known in her time for painting female figures from the Bible and their suffering. For example, the one seen above depicts the story from the Book of Daniel. Susanna is bathing in her garden when two elders began to spy on her in the nude. As she finishes they stop her and tell her that they will tell everyone that they saw her have an affair with a young man (she’s married so this is an offense punishable by death) unless she has sex with them. She refuses, they tell their tale, and she is going to be put to death when the protagonist of the book (Daniel) stops them.
So that painting above? That was her first major painting. She was SEVENTEEN-YEARS-OLD. For context, here is a painting of the same story by Alessandro Allori made just four years earlier in 1606: 

Wowwwww. That does not look like a woman being threatened with a choice between death or rape. So imagine 17 year old Artemisia trying to approach painting the scene of a woman being assaulted. And she paints what is seen in the x-ray above. A woman in horrifying, grotesque anguish with what appears to be a knife poised in her clenched hand. Damn that shit is real. Who wants to guess that she was advised by, perhaps her father or others, to tone it down. Women can’t look that grotesque. Sexual assault can’t be depicted as that horrifying. And women definitely can’t be seen as having the potential to fight back. Certainly not in artwork. Women need to be soft. They need to wilt from their captors but still look pretty and be a damsel in distress. So she changed it. 
What’s interesting to note is that she eventually painted and stuck with some of her own, less traditional depictions of women. However, that is more interesting with some context.  
(Warning for reference to rape, torture, and images of paintings which show violence and blood.)
So, Gentileschi’s story continues in the very next year, 1611, when her father hires Agostino Tassi, an artist, to privately tutor her. It was in this time when Tassi raped her. He then proceeded to promise that he would marry her. He pointed out that if it got out that she had lost her virginity to a man she wasn’t going to marry then it would ruin her. Using this, he emotionally manipulated her into continuing a sexual relationship with him. However, he then proceeded to marry someone else. Horrified at this turn of events she went to her father. Orazio was having none of this shit and took Tassi to court. At that time, rape wasn’t technically an offense to warrant a trial, but the fact that he had taken her virginity (and therefore technically “damaged Orazio’s property”. ugh.) meant that the trial went along. It lasted for 7 months. During this time, to prove the truth of her words, Artemisia was given invasive gynecological examinations and was even questioned while being subjected to torture via thumb screws. It was also discovered during the trial that Tassi was planning to kill his current wife, have an affair with her sister, and steal a number of Orazio’s paintings. Tassi was found guilty and was given a prison sentence of…. ONE. YEAR……. Which he never even served because the verdict was annulled.
During this time and a bit after (1611-1612), Artemisia painted her most famous work of Judith Slaying Holofernes. This bible story involved Holofernes, an Assyrian general, leading troops to invade and destroy Bethulia, the home of Judith. Judith decides to deal with this issue by coming to him, flirting with him to get his guard down, and then plying him with food and lots of wine. When he passed out, Judith and her handmaiden took his sword and cut his head off. Issue averted. The subject was a very popular one for art at the time. Here is a version of the scene painted in 1598-99 by Carivaggio, whom was a great stylistic influence on Artemisia:

This depiction is a pretty good example of how this scene was typically depicted. Artists usually went out of their way to show Judith committing the act (or having committed it) while trying to detach her from the actual violence of it. In this way, they could avoid her losing the morality of her character and also avoid showing a woman committing such aggression. So here we see a young, rather delicate looking Judith in a pure white dress. She is daintily holding down this massive man and looks rather disgusted and upset at having to do this. Now, here is Artemisia’s:

Damn. Thats a whole different scene. Here Holofernes looks less like he’s simply surprised by the goings ons and more like a man choking on his own blood and struggling fruitlessly against his captors. The blood here is less of a bright red than in Carrivaggio’s but is somehow more sickening. It feels more real, and gushes in a much less stylized way than Carrivaggio’s. Not to mention, Judith here is far from removed from the violence. She is putting her physical weight into this act. Her hands (much stronger looking than most depictions of women’s hands in early artwork) are working hard. Her face, as well, is completely different. She doesn’t look upset, necessarily, but more determined. 
It’s also worth note that the handmaiden is now involved in the action. It’s worth note because, during her rape trial, Artemisia stated that she had cried for help during the initial rape. Specifically she had called for Tassi’s female tenant in the building, Tuzia. Tuzia not only ignored her cries for help, but she also denied the whole happening. Tuzia had been a friend of Artemisia’s and in fact was one of her only female friends. Artemisia felt extremely betrayed, but rather than turning her against her own gender, this event instilled in her the deep importance of female relationships and solidarity among women. This can be seen in some of her artwork, and I believe in the one above, as well, with the inclusion of the handmaiden in the act.
So, I just added a million words worth of information dump on a post when no one asked me, but there we go. I could talk for ages about Artemisia as a person and her depictions of women (even beyond what I wrote above. Don’t get me started on her depictions of female nudes in comparison to how male artists painted nude women at the time.) 
To sum up: Artemisia Gentileschi is rad as hell. This x-ray is also rad as hell and makes her even radder.
I love art history.


I’m reblogging this again to add something that I also think is important to know about Artemisia Gentileschi.Back in her time and through even to TODAY, there are people who argue that her artworks were greatly aided by her father…. As in he either helped her paint them or just straight up painted them himself. Hell, there are a number of works only recently (past several years or so) that have been officially attributed to Artemisia because people originally saw the signature with “Gentileschi” in it and automatically attributed it to Orazio.So, not only was Artemisia Gentileschi an amazing artist and amazing historical figure, but I don’t want it to be ignored that there are people over 400 years later who still won’t give her the credit she deserves, just because she’s a woman and obviously women can’t paint like she did.

rgfellows: rgfellows: kanyewestboro: calanoida: Susanna and the Elders, Restored (Left) Susanna and the Elders, Restored with X-ray (...

inclusion: <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/170744530739/black-history-month-day-10-gospelblues-singer" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote><p>Black history month day 10: Gospel/Blues singer Blind Willie Johnson.</p> <p>Johnson was born to sharecroppers in a small town near Waco, Texas on January 25, 1897. His mother died when he was only 4, and his father remarried. When he was five years old his father gave him a cigar box guitar as his first instrument. He was not born blind, but acquired the condition early in life. It is unclear exactly how, although some historians agree that he was blinded after being splashed in the face with a caustic liquid by his stepmother. Other theories are that he was wearing the wrong glasses or that he viewed a partial solar eclipse that was visible over Texas in 1905. At any rate, Johnson became a musician and street preacher, earning change on street corners for his performances. In 1927 he recorded several sessions at a pop up studio with talent scout Frank Buckley Walker, Who also discovered stars such as Hank Williams. Johnson was given $50 for each usable side, plus a bonus for relinquishing any royalties from the sales of the records.</p> <p>He had four more recording sessions and a fairly successful career as a recording artist and street preacher until the great depression minimized his audience. In 1945, his home was destroyed by a fire but he continued to live in the ruins as he had nowhere else to go. Because of these living conditions he was exposed to the humidity and contracted malarial fever. The local hospitals would not admit him, either because of his visual impairment or because of his race. Over the course of the year his condition steadily worsened and he died on September 18, 1945. His death certificate reported syphilis and blindness as contributing factors.</p> <p>Johnson’s music was revived in the 1960s thanks in large part to his inclusion on Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music in 1952 and the efforts of the blues guitarist Reverend Gary Davis, a highly regarded figure in New York’s blossoming folk scene who taught Johnson’s music to young musicians. This led to his music being re-interpreted by acts like Peter, Paul and Mary and Bob Dylan. </p> <p>This is the only known picture of Blind Willie Johnson.</p></blockquote> <p>And I just have to include one of his most famous songs, in fact one that was selected by Carl Sagan and others to be placed on Voyager 1 (which is now the furthest man-made object from earth at over 10,000,000,000 miles away) in case extraterrestrial beings ever came across it and wanted to learn something about the people of earth. No words, just plaintive humming. Meant to represent abject and total loneliness: <a href="https://youtu.be/BNj2BXW852g">https://youtu.be/BNj2BXW852g</a></p>
inclusion: <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/170744530739/black-history-month-day-10-gospelblues-singer" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p>Black history month day 10: Gospel/Blues singer Blind Willie Johnson.</p>

<p>Johnson was born to sharecroppers in a small town near Waco, Texas on January 25, 1897. His mother died when he was only 4, and his father remarried. When he was five years old his father gave him a cigar box guitar as his first instrument. He was not born blind, but acquired the condition early in life. It is unclear exactly how, although some historians agree that he was blinded after being splashed in the face with a caustic liquid by his stepmother. Other theories are that he was wearing the wrong glasses or that he viewed a partial solar eclipse that was visible over Texas in 1905. At any rate, Johnson became a musician and street preacher, earning change on street corners for his performances. In 1927 he recorded several sessions at a pop up studio with talent scout Frank Buckley Walker, Who also discovered stars such as Hank Williams. Johnson was given $50 for each usable side, plus a bonus for relinquishing any royalties from the sales of the records.</p>

<p>He had four more recording sessions and a fairly successful career as a recording artist and street preacher until the great depression minimized his audience. In 1945, his home was destroyed by a fire but he continued to live in the ruins as he had nowhere else to go. Because of these living conditions he was exposed to the humidity and contracted malarial fever. The local hospitals would not admit him, either because of his visual impairment or because of his race. Over the course of the year his condition steadily worsened and he died on September 18, 1945. His death certificate reported syphilis and blindness as contributing factors.</p>

<p>Johnson’s music was revived in the 1960s thanks in large part to his inclusion on Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music in 1952 and the efforts of the blues guitarist Reverend Gary Davis, a highly regarded figure in New York’s blossoming folk scene who taught Johnson’s music to young musicians. This led to his music being re-interpreted by acts like Peter, Paul and Mary and Bob Dylan. </p>

<p>This is the only known picture of Blind Willie Johnson.</p></blockquote>

<p>And I just have to include one of his most famous songs, in fact one that was selected by Carl Sagan and others to be placed on Voyager 1 (which is now the furthest man-made object from earth at over 10,000,000,000 miles away) in case extraterrestrial beings ever came across it and wanted to learn something about the people of earth. No words, just plaintive humming. Meant to represent abject and total loneliness: <a href="https://youtu.be/BNj2BXW852g">https://youtu.be/BNj2BXW852g</a></p>

<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/170744530739/black-history-month-day-10-gospelblues-singer" class="tumblr_blog">liberta...

inclusion: <p>Black history month day 10: Gospel/Blues singer Blind Willie Johnson.</p> <p>Johnson was born to sharecroppers in a small town near Waco, Texas on January 25, 1897. His mother died when he was only 4, and his father remarried. When he was five years old his father gave him a cigar box guitar as his first instrument. He was not born blind, but acquired the condition early in life. It is unclear exactly how, although some historians agree that he was blinded after being splashed in the face with a caustic liquid by his stepmother. Other theories are that he was wearing the wrong glasses or that he viewed a partial solar eclipse that was visible over Texas in 1905. At any rate, Johnson became a musician and street preacher, earning change on street corners for his performances. In 1927 he recorded several sessions at a pop up studio with talent scout Frank Buckley Walker, Who also discovered stars such as Hank Williams. Johnson was given $50 for each usable side, plus a bonus for relinquishing any royalties from the sales of the records.</p> <p>He had four more recording sessions and a fairly successful career as a recording artist and street preacher until the great depression minimized his audience. In 1945, his home was destroyed by a fire but he continued to live in the ruins as he had nowhere else to go. Because of these living conditions he was exposed to the humidity and contracted malarial fever. The local hospitals would not admit him, either because of his visual impairment or because of his race. Over the course of the year his condition steadily worsened and he died on September 18, 1945. His death certificate reported syphilis and blindness as contributing factors.</p> <p>Johnson&rsquo;s music was revived in the 1960s thanks in large part to his inclusion on Harry Smith&rsquo;s Anthology of American Folk Music in 1952 and the efforts of the blues guitarist Reverend Gary Davis, a highly regarded figure in New York&rsquo;s blossoming folk scene who taught Johnson&rsquo;s music to young musicians. This led to his music being re-interpreted by acts like Peter, Paul and Mary and Bob Dylan. </p> <p>This is the only known picture of Blind Willie Johnson.</p>
inclusion: <p>Black history month day 10: Gospel/Blues singer Blind Willie Johnson.</p>

<p>Johnson was born to sharecroppers in a small town near Waco, Texas on January 25, 1897. His mother died when he was only 4, and his father remarried. When he was five years old his father gave him a cigar box guitar as his first instrument. He was not born blind, but acquired the condition early in life. It is unclear exactly how, although some historians agree that he was blinded after being splashed in the face with a caustic liquid by his stepmother. Other theories are that he was wearing the wrong glasses or that he viewed a partial solar eclipse that was visible over Texas in 1905. At any rate, Johnson became a musician and street preacher, earning change on street corners for his performances. In 1927 he recorded several sessions at a pop up studio with talent scout Frank Buckley Walker, Who also discovered stars such as Hank Williams. Johnson was given $50 for each usable side, plus a bonus for relinquishing any royalties from the sales of the records.</p>

<p>He had four more recording sessions and a fairly successful career as a recording artist and street preacher until the great depression minimized his audience. In 1945, his home was destroyed by a fire but he continued to live in the ruins as he had nowhere else to go. Because of these living conditions he was exposed to the humidity and contracted malarial fever. The local hospitals would not admit him, either because of his visual impairment or because of his race. Over the course of the year his condition steadily worsened and he died on September 18, 1945. His death certificate reported syphilis and blindness as contributing factors.</p>

<p>Johnson&rsquo;s music was revived in the 1960s thanks in large part to his inclusion on Harry Smith&rsquo;s Anthology of American Folk Music in 1952 and the efforts of the blues guitarist Reverend Gary Davis, a highly regarded figure in New York&rsquo;s blossoming folk scene who taught Johnson&rsquo;s music to young musicians. This led to his music being re-interpreted by acts like Peter, Paul and Mary and Bob Dylan. </p>

<p>This is the only known picture of Blind Willie Johnson.</p>

<p>Black history month day 10: Gospel/Blues singer Blind Willie Johnson.</p> <p>Johnson was born to sharecroppers in a small town near W...

inclusion: D.C. Mayor Welcomes Golden State Warriors "If Anyone Ever Tells You That You Cannot Come to D.C., Tell Them Mayor Bowser Invited You" @balleralert D.C. Mayor Welcomes Golden State Warriors “If Anyone Ever Tells You That You Cannot Come to D.C., Tell Them Mayor Bowser Invited You” - blogged by @MsJennyb ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On Friday, StephCurry shared his opinion about the Golden State Warriors’ championship visit to the White House. Although he didn’t want to go for his own personal beliefs, the final decision would be left up to the team and organization. However, before the team was able to decide for themselves, Trump took offense to Curry’s statement and withdrew the invitation, prompting a Twitter storm of backlash. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In turn, the Warriors released a statement, saying they would use their trip to D.C. to embrace their team values of equality and inclusion. Shortly after the team’s announcement, another elected official in D.C. welcomed the team to the nation’s capital. D.C. Mayor MurielBowser shared a statement on social media welcoming the team to practice their First Amendment rights and-or lose to their beloved Washington Wizards during Warriors’ visit in February. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “We are Washington, D.C. We are proud to be our nation’s capital,” Bowser said. “We welcome over 20 million visitors a year. Whether you’re here to work, play, practice your First Amendment rights, or lose to our Wizards, we welcome all to visit our museums, our monuments, our restaurants, and our thriving neighborhoods if they do so peacefully and respectfully. While you’re here, Warriors, we are happy to identify ways for you to celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion – what we call DC values. And if anyone ever tells you that you cannot come to DC, tell them Muriel Bowser invited you.”
inclusion: D.C. Mayor Welcomes Golden State Warriors "If
 Anyone Ever Tells You That You Cannot Come
 to D.C., Tell Them Mayor Bowser Invited You"
 @balleralert
D.C. Mayor Welcomes Golden State Warriors “If Anyone Ever Tells You That You Cannot Come to D.C., Tell Them Mayor Bowser Invited You” - blogged by @MsJennyb ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ On Friday, StephCurry shared his opinion about the Golden State Warriors’ championship visit to the White House. Although he didn’t want to go for his own personal beliefs, the final decision would be left up to the team and organization. However, before the team was able to decide for themselves, Trump took offense to Curry’s statement and withdrew the invitation, prompting a Twitter storm of backlash. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In turn, the Warriors released a statement, saying they would use their trip to D.C. to embrace their team values of equality and inclusion. Shortly after the team’s announcement, another elected official in D.C. welcomed the team to the nation’s capital. D.C. Mayor MurielBowser shared a statement on social media welcoming the team to practice their First Amendment rights and-or lose to their beloved Washington Wizards during Warriors’ visit in February. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “We are Washington, D.C. We are proud to be our nation’s capital,” Bowser said. “We welcome over 20 million visitors a year. Whether you’re here to work, play, practice your First Amendment rights, or lose to our Wizards, we welcome all to visit our museums, our monuments, our restaurants, and our thriving neighborhoods if they do so peacefully and respectfully. While you’re here, Warriors, we are happy to identify ways for you to celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion – what we call DC values. And if anyone ever tells you that you cannot come to DC, tell them Muriel Bowser invited you.”

D.C. Mayor Welcomes Golden State Warriors “If Anyone Ever Tells You That You Cannot Come to D.C., Tell Them Mayor Bowser Invited You” - b...

inclusion: Nintendo's follow up to their incredibly popular NES Classic retro console is coming. The SNES Classic was just announced by Big N and promises to give the classic treatment to 21 of the SNES's biggest games, all in a tiny bundle that's easier to plug in and play than its namesake original. Scheduled to debut on September 29th, there's no pre-ordering to do just yet but guarentee that's very far off. Given the NES Classic's astounding popularity this past holiday season and the fact that Nintendo themselves discontinued production of the NES Classic, there's no reason to think that the SNES Classic will be any less popular or hard to get. The game's included rounds up some of the second generation Nintendo system's most beloved games. You can check out the game list right here but you can also rest assured that, if you've been itching to revisit amazing games like F-Zero, Super Mario World or Star Fox, this little gadget will scratch that itch. In case you missed it, of special note is the inclusion of Star Fox 2,a game that was developed for the SNES, completed by Nintendo, but never released. So even if you've got no interest in "old" games, the SNES Classic Edition offers something new. SUPER Famicom スーパーファミコン The Japanese version of the mini system, called the Nintendo Classic Mini Super Famicom, also comes with 21 games, but only 16 of those align with the North American/U.K, set. Although the U.K. and North American versions share the same library of games, the U.K. does get the rounded, colorful Super Famicom-styling for its Super NES, just like it did in the 90s, as opposed to the aesthetically awkward North American design. HUMAN SOCCER The Nintendo Classic Mini Super Famicom hits stores in Japan on October 5 for US$72 Clamoring for a Nintendo 64 Classic Edition is expected to start by mid-October at the latest. If you've been itching to revisit amazing games like F-Zero, Super Mario World or Star Fox, this little gadget will scratch that itch laughoutloud-club: SNES Classic Edition Announced, Brings Back The ‘90s in more ways than you can imagine
inclusion: Nintendo's follow up to their incredibly popular NES Classic retro
 console is coming. The SNES Classic was just announced by Big N
 and promises to give the classic treatment to 21 of the SNES's
 biggest games, all in a tiny bundle that's easier to plug in and play
 than its namesake original.
 Scheduled to debut on September 29th, there's no pre-ordering to
 do just yet but guarentee that's very far off.
 Given the NES Classic's astounding popularity this past holiday
 season and the fact that Nintendo themselves discontinued
 production of the NES Classic, there's no reason to think that the
 SNES Classic will be any less popular or hard to get.
 The game's included rounds up some of the second generation
 Nintendo system's most beloved games. You can check out the
 game list right here but you can also rest assured that, if you've been
 itching to revisit amazing games like F-Zero, Super Mario World or
 Star Fox, this little gadget will scratch that itch.
 In case you missed it, of special note is the inclusion of Star Fox 2,a
 game that was developed for the SNES, completed by Nintendo, but
 never released. So even if you've got no interest in "old" games, the
 SNES Classic Edition offers something new.
 SUPER Famicom
 スーパーファミコン
 The Japanese version of the mini system, called the Nintendo Classic
 Mini Super Famicom, also comes with 21 games, but only 16 of those
 align with the North American/U.K, set.
 Although the U.K. and North American versions share the same
 library of games, the U.K. does get the rounded, colorful Super
 Famicom-styling for its Super NES, just like it did in the 90s, as
 opposed to the aesthetically awkward North American design.
 HUMAN
 SOCCER
 The Nintendo Classic Mini Super Famicom hits stores in Japan on
 October 5 for US$72 Clamoring for a Nintendo 64 Classic Edition is
 expected to start by mid-October at the latest.
 If you've been itching to revisit amazing games like F-Zero, Super
 Mario World or Star Fox, this little gadget will scratch that itch
laughoutloud-club:

SNES Classic Edition Announced, Brings Back The ‘90s in more ways than you can imagine

laughoutloud-club: SNES Classic Edition Announced, Brings Back The ‘90s in more ways than you can imagine

inclusion: When you & bae match Love the inclusion of the Atlantean glyph on Mera's suit to compliment Aquaman's. Very 🤴 & 👸 -esque [Like•Follow•Listen•@TheNiceGuyCast]
inclusion: When you & bae match
Love the inclusion of the Atlantean glyph on Mera's suit to compliment Aquaman's. Very 🤴 & 👸 -esque [Like•Follow•Listen•@TheNiceGuyCast]

Love the inclusion of the Atlantean glyph on Mera's suit to compliment Aquaman's. Very 🤴 & 👸 -esque [Like•Follow•Listen•@TheNiceGuyCast]

inclusion: LOVE MI BLACKNess AND yOURS DAILY CALLER LIKE EDUCATION University Students Want Free Tuition For Blacks As Reparations For Slavery BY DAVID KRAYDEN 20 APRIL 2017 @Regrann from @maarifacircle - Students at Western Kentucky University (WKU) think black students should have free tuition as a means of providing reparations for past wrongs like slavery, Campus Reform reports.In a vote on Tuesday, the Western Kentucky University student government passed a resolution, 19-10, that advocates the recognition of slavery as a “debt that will never be paid” and offer free tuition to black students as compensation.The resolution also seeks the creation of a special task force to investigate the possibility of amending the admissions system so that it is weighted geographically — which, theoretically, would make acceptance at WKU easier for black students.Andre Ambam, who fought for the resolution, told the WKU Herald that racial inequality is the basis of economic inequality — the chief reason for blacks not attending college.“If you really care about diversity, if you really care about inclusion, if you really care about making this campus safe and accessible to everybody, having the student government’s support of reparation[s] for black students would be amazing,” Ambam said.Student senator Lily Nellans said the resolution is designed to compensate black people for the white privilege that has historically defined American society.“A lot of times equality can feel like oppression for those who are losing their advantage, but that’s not a reason we shouldn’t fight for equality,” Nellans said. - - 🔰"Malcolm X — 'These negroes aren't asking for no nation. They wanna crawl back on the plantation.' - diversity nationbuilding marching petitions blackbusiness selfrespect - regrann
inclusion: LOVE
 MI
 BLACKNess
 AND
 yOURS
 DAILY CALLER
 LIKE
 EDUCATION
 University Students
 Want Free Tuition For
 Blacks As Reparations
 For Slavery
 BY DAVID KRAYDEN
 20 APRIL 2017
@Regrann from @maarifacircle - Students at Western Kentucky University (WKU) think black students should have free tuition as a means of providing reparations for past wrongs like slavery, Campus Reform reports.In a vote on Tuesday, the Western Kentucky University student government passed a resolution, 19-10, that advocates the recognition of slavery as a “debt that will never be paid” and offer free tuition to black students as compensation.The resolution also seeks the creation of a special task force to investigate the possibility of amending the admissions system so that it is weighted geographically — which, theoretically, would make acceptance at WKU easier for black students.Andre Ambam, who fought for the resolution, told the WKU Herald that racial inequality is the basis of economic inequality — the chief reason for blacks not attending college.“If you really care about diversity, if you really care about inclusion, if you really care about making this campus safe and accessible to everybody, having the student government’s support of reparation[s] for black students would be amazing,” Ambam said.Student senator Lily Nellans said the resolution is designed to compensate black people for the white privilege that has historically defined American society.“A lot of times equality can feel like oppression for those who are losing their advantage, but that’s not a reason we shouldn’t fight for equality,” Nellans said. - - 🔰"Malcolm X — 'These negroes aren't asking for no nation. They wanna crawl back on the plantation.' - diversity nationbuilding marching petitions blackbusiness selfrespect - regrann

@Regrann from @maarifacircle - Students at Western Kentucky University (WKU) think black students should have free tuition as a means of...

inclusion: Fr. Matt Bozovsky @FrMatt2013 12h Um this is a joke, right? Someone please tell me this is a parody accout and not actually coming from a Catholic priest. James Martin, SJ Φ @JamesMartinSJ It saddens me that a #trans student cannot choose what bathrooms to use. A basic need. It's an affront to their dignity as human beings. 34 133074 James Martin, SJ @JamesMartinSJ @FrMatt2013 No, I'm an actual Catholic priest in good standing who stands with the marginalized. Some charity is in order here, Father. fatedefied: romancingthebookworm: trapqueenkoopa: weavemama: POPE TWITTER IS FUCKING POPPIN  things heat up in the jesus fandom SWEET POTATOES YES. I adore Fr. Martin.  Looked into it, and it’s real. Not only that, but if you look at his twitter account, he made some more awesome tweets that day that make me really happy to be a Catholic. I’ll include screenshots and text versions of them below. It saddens me that a #trans student cannot choose what bathrooms to use. A basic need. It’s an affront to their dignity as human beings. And who is harmed by a #trans student using a bathroom? I’ve seen women using men’s rooms when the ladies’ rooms were full. Who is harmed? As usual, the one who is made to suffer indignities is the one on the margins, the one seen as “other,” the one seen as “them.” But for Jesus, there is no “other.” There is no “them.”  There is only “us.” So we must be about openness, acceptance and inclusion. #trans  Who should stand with the marginalized, the mocked, the bullied, the confused, the outcast, the minority? The Christian should. #trans Because Jesus did.  His Facebook post that day says something similar:  Who should stand with the marginalized, the mocked, the bullied, the outcast, the confused, the hurt? Who should stand with the one seen as “different,” the one seen as “other,” the one seen as “them”? Who should stand with people who often stand alone? The Christian should. Because Jesus did.
inclusion: Fr. Matt Bozovsky @FrMatt2013 12h
 Um this is a joke, right? Someone
 please tell me this is a parody accout
 and not actually coming from a Catholic
 priest.
 James Martin, SJ Φ @JamesMartinSJ
 It saddens me that a #trans student
 cannot choose what bathrooms to
 use. A basic need. It's an affront to
 their dignity as human beings.
 34
 133074
 James Martin, SJ
 @JamesMartinSJ
 @FrMatt2013 No, I'm an actual Catholic
 priest in good standing who stands with
 the marginalized. Some charity is in
 order here, Father.
fatedefied:
romancingthebookworm:

trapqueenkoopa:

weavemama:
POPE TWITTER IS FUCKING POPPIN 
things heat up in the jesus fandom

SWEET POTATOES YES. I adore Fr. Martin. 

Looked into it, and it’s real. Not only that, but if you look at his twitter account, he made some more awesome tweets that day that make me really happy to be a Catholic. I’ll include screenshots and text versions of them below.
It saddens me that a #trans student cannot choose what bathrooms to use. A basic need. It’s an affront to their dignity as human beings.
And who is harmed by a #trans student using a bathroom? I’ve seen women using men’s rooms when the ladies’ rooms were full. Who is harmed?
As usual, the one who is made to suffer indignities is the one on the margins, the one seen as “other,” the one seen as “them.”
But for Jesus, there is no “other.” There is no “them.”  There is only “us.” So we must be about openness, acceptance and inclusion. #trans 


Who should stand with the marginalized, the mocked, the bullied, the confused, the outcast, the minority? The Christian should. #trans




Because Jesus did. 
His Facebook post that day says something similar: 

Who should stand with the marginalized, the mocked, the bullied, the outcast, the confused, the hurt? Who should stand with the one seen as “different,” the one seen as “other,” the one seen as “them”? Who should stand with people who often stand alone? The Christian should. Because Jesus did.

fatedefied: romancingthebookworm: trapqueenkoopa: weavemama: POPE TWITTER IS FUCKING POPPIN  things heat up in the jesus fandom SWEET...