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Anaconda, At-St, and Chicago: Clara Belle Williams, the first black graduate of New Mexico State University. Many or her professors would not allow her inside the class room, she had to take notes from the hallway; she was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma. She became a great teacher, of black students by day, and by night she taught their parents (former slaves) home economics. she lived past 100, after her death, NMSU renamed the English Department building after her. Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent College, now (Prairie View A & M University) in 1908. Williams enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928, after taking some courses at the University of Chicago. While she worked as a teacher at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, she also took college courses during the summer. Most of Williams professors did not allow her inside the classroom because she was Black. But that didn’t stop Clara. She had to take notes from the hallway–standing up! That’s right, she wasn’t even given a chair to sit in many of those classes. She was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma because of the segregation laws. Despite what they did or said against her, she still graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from NMSU in 1937 at the age of 51. Williams went on to continue her education beyond her graduation date, taking graduate-level classes well into the 1950s. She married Jasper Williams in 1917. The couple raised three sons. She urged her sons to do well in school and succeed in higher education. All three of her children went to college and graduated with medical degrees. One attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C and the two other children graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They founded the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. . Her eldest son Dr. Jasper Williams, was chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago, a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, past president of the Cook County Physicians Association, and a founding director of the Seaway National Bank of Chicago, now the country’s largest black-owned bank. So you see, if it wasn’t for Clara’s dedication and perseverance, we would have never seen such excellence. via blackdoctor.org ClaraBelleWilliams theblaquelioness
Anaconda, At-St, and Chicago: Clara Belle Williams, the first black graduate of New
 Mexico State University. Many or her professors
 would not allow her inside the class room, she had to
 take notes from the hallway; she was also not allowed
 to walk with her class to get her diploma. She became
 a great teacher, of black students by day, and by night
 she taught their parents (former slaves) home
 economics. she lived past 100, after her death, NMSU
 renamed the English Department building after her.
Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent College, now (Prairie View A & M University) in 1908. Williams enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928, after taking some courses at the University of Chicago. While she worked as a teacher at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, she also took college courses during the summer. Most of Williams professors did not allow her inside the classroom because she was Black. But that didn’t stop Clara. She had to take notes from the hallway–standing up! That’s right, she wasn’t even given a chair to sit in many of those classes. She was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma because of the segregation laws. Despite what they did or said against her, she still graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from NMSU in 1937 at the age of 51. Williams went on to continue her education beyond her graduation date, taking graduate-level classes well into the 1950s. She married Jasper Williams in 1917. The couple raised three sons. She urged her sons to do well in school and succeed in higher education. All three of her children went to college and graduated with medical degrees. One attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C and the two other children graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They founded the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. . Her eldest son Dr. Jasper Williams, was chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago, a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, past president of the Cook County Physicians Association, and a founding director of the Seaway National Bank of Chicago, now the country’s largest black-owned bank. So you see, if it wasn’t for Clara’s dedication and perseverance, we would have never seen such excellence. via blackdoctor.org ClaraBelleWilliams theblaquelioness

Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent Coll...

Facebook, Google, and Internet: TECH E.U. NIXES CONTENT LAW July 5 The European Parliament votes against controversial set of copyright laws that would require online platforms to pay and censor shared content The European Parliament voted against a controversial set of copyright laws that digital rights campaigners said could change the way content is shared online. One rule that was voted against, known as Article 13, would have required online platforms like Google and Facebook to filter out content that infringed on copyright laws. The proposed law sparked debate over how music, images, and videos would be shared over the internet. Executive director of the London-based digital rights organization Open-rights Group, Jim Killock said: - “Round one of the Robo-Copyright wars is over. The E.U. Parliament has recognized that machine censorship of copyright material is not an easy and simple fix.” ___ Many digital rights activists worried the legislation could affect meme culture, as memes traditionally re-purpose images or video clips. ___ Another element of the proposed set of rules, known as Article 11, would require online platforms to pay publishers for news video clips. ___ The copyright directives were initially approved by the European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs last month, but aggressive protests by digital rights activists allowed for a secondary vote in the E.U. Parliament chamber. The laws will be reworked and voted on again in September.
Facebook, Google, and Internet: TECH
 E.U. NIXES CONTENT LAW
 July 5 The European Parliament votes
 against controversial set of copyright laws
 that would require online platforms to pay
 and censor shared content
The European Parliament voted against a controversial set of copyright laws that digital rights campaigners said could change the way content is shared online. One rule that was voted against, known as Article 13, would have required online platforms like Google and Facebook to filter out content that infringed on copyright laws. The proposed law sparked debate over how music, images, and videos would be shared over the internet. Executive director of the London-based digital rights organization Open-rights Group, Jim Killock said: - “Round one of the Robo-Copyright wars is over. The E.U. Parliament has recognized that machine censorship of copyright material is not an easy and simple fix.” ___ Many digital rights activists worried the legislation could affect meme culture, as memes traditionally re-purpose images or video clips. ___ Another element of the proposed set of rules, known as Article 11, would require online platforms to pay publishers for news video clips. ___ The copyright directives were initially approved by the European Parliament Committee on Legal Affairs last month, but aggressive protests by digital rights activists allowed for a secondary vote in the E.U. Parliament chamber. The laws will be reworked and voted on again in September.

The European Parliament voted against a controversial set of copyright laws that digital rights campaigners said could change the way conten...