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Love, Scream, and Struggle: THE BEST THINGS TO REMEMBER when writing a highly emotional scene Show, don't tell; it's the golden rule of writing. I get it, you hear it everywhere you turn, and by now (even if you don't totally get it), you've become desensitized to the mantra. It's actually a pretty hard thing to master. Believe or not, all writers struggle to show, but I hope this lesson will help you out! NO EMOTION WORDS USE ACTION No, your character isn't sad, happy, devastated, in pain, angry, nervous, scared, or worried. Don't use words like this that describe emotions They cut down on the hit of your scene, and they're harder for readers to connect to/get emotional over Instead of being angry, your character is screaming, has their fists tightly clenched, and is trembling. See what I did? I took the emotion, thought of how to show it, and used that instead. It adds a little oomph, and it's more sensory for your reader USE SETTING USE PERCEPTIONS I dig this one. Your character is sad? No, your character is suddenly seeing their lover not as their lover, but something they just lost in battle. Their perception of what that person is changed. Love turns to loss, smiling turns to tears. Nothing is the same after the emotional action hits Your character is happy? Yeah, no they're not. Your character is noticing the tiniest, most delicate things about their new car that are, in all honesty, kind of weird to notice on just a normal car. When you love something, you notice more. When it makes you sad, you try to close it out. See? GO OUT OF BOUNDS High emotion often means lovw ability to think things through. It's okay to make your character wander from their borders during highly emotional moments. Make themm kick, scream, kiss harder, throw stuff, break down sobbing, knock out some teeth. I promise, it's okay! You're not out of bounds! USE DIALOGUE Angry? You'll say things you really don't mean. Sad? You'll hide the truth. Happy? You'll confess. Use these human faults to vour advantage. Alter your character's dialogue, word choice, and ability to open up during highly emotional scenes to portray what they feel through their words! PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! This is not easy to master. It seems simple, but it can be frustrating time consuming, and confusing. Take some time to sit and make lists. Scour your piece for emotion words, and replace them with other representations of that emotion. Get a little frustrated! It's okay to have to practice this, and if you do regularly and the right way, you will get better. It just takes time. Presented by: Olivia Paige at www.oliviapaigewrites.tumblr.com oliviapaigewrites:THIS IS AN IMPORTANT ONE! Don’t ignore this in your writing!
Love, Scream, and Struggle: THE BEST THINGS TO
 REMEMBER
 when writing a highly emotional
 scene
 Show, don't tell; it's the golden rule of writing. I get it, you hear it
 everywhere you turn, and by now (even if you don't totally get it),
 you've become desensitized to the mantra. It's actually a pretty
 hard thing to master. Believe or not, all writers struggle to show,
 but I hope this lesson will help you out!
 NO EMOTION WORDS
 USE ACTION
 No, your character isn't sad, happy,
 devastated, in pain, angry, nervous,
 scared, or worried. Don't use words
 like this that describe emotions
 They cut down on the hit of your
 scene, and they're harder for readers
 to connect to/get emotional over
 Instead of being angry, your
 character is screaming, has their
 fists tightly clenched, and is
 trembling. See what I did? I took the
 emotion, thought of how to show it,
 and used that instead. It adds a little
 oomph, and it's more sensory for
 your reader
 USE SETTING
 USE PERCEPTIONS
 I dig this one. Your character is sad?
 No, your character is suddenly
 seeing their lover not as their lover,
 but something they just lost in
 battle. Their perception of what that
 person is changed. Love turns to
 loss, smiling turns to tears. Nothing
 is the same after the emotional
 action hits
 Your character is happy? Yeah, no
 they're not. Your character is
 noticing the tiniest, most delicate
 things about their new car that are,
 in all honesty, kind of weird to notice
 on just a normal car. When you love
 something, you notice more. When it
 makes you sad, you try to close it
 out. See?
 GO OUT OF BOUNDS
 High emotion often means lovw
 ability to think things through. It's
 okay to make your character wander
 from their borders during highly
 emotional moments. Make themm
 kick, scream, kiss harder, throw
 stuff, break down sobbing, knock
 out some teeth. I promise, it's okay!
 You're not out of bounds!
 USE DIALOGUE
 Angry? You'll say things you really
 don't mean. Sad? You'll hide the
 truth. Happy? You'll confess. Use
 these human faults to vour
 advantage. Alter your character's
 dialogue, word choice, and ability to
 open up during highly emotional
 scenes to portray what they feel
 through their words!
 PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!
 This is not easy to master. It seems simple, but it can be frustrating
 time consuming, and confusing. Take some time to sit and make
 lists. Scour your piece for emotion words, and replace them with
 other representations of that emotion. Get a little frustrated! It's okay
 to have to practice this, and if you do regularly and the right way, you
 will get better. It just takes time.
 Presented by: Olivia Paige at www.oliviapaigewrites.tumblr.com
oliviapaigewrites:THIS IS AN IMPORTANT ONE! Don’t ignore this in your writing!

oliviapaigewrites:THIS IS AN IMPORTANT ONE! Don’t ignore this in your writing!