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Lowkey: kids, the animal world &gender This morning, my 5yo asked us if his new boy-kitten would grow up to be a daddy cat. We said that no, he wouldn't, and were about to explain that this is because the kitten is desexed when my son said, "Oh, that's right - because if you don't grow up to be a mummy or a daddy, then you're not a boy or a girl you're just a person! It turns out, he's been lowkey assuming that there are three grown-up genders: mummy, daddy, and adult, such that anyone who isn't a parent is, in some sense, nonbinary. We explained that, while he's right in thinking there are people who aren't boys or girls, your adult gender isn't determined by whether or not you have a kid, and used examples of people we know as proof. He accepted this with a nod, then went off to play with the kitten, We had a related conversation at bedtime last week, when the "story" he'd chosen was a book of facts about Australian animals. One of the entries we read was about the barramundi fish, which are all male as babies and only turn female during spawning season. This prompted him to ask if human boys could turn into girls, too, and while he was a bit too sleepy for a detailed conversation, I said something along the lines of, "yes, there are some people who look like boys when they're little, but who realise they're girls and change when they get older." He accepted that, too, and then we read another entry about a particular type of bat. These are only two small examples, but it's endlessly fascinating to me to watch how kids are trying to figure out what gender is and what it means from the world around them. There have been times when my son has come home saying that pink is for girls, because that's what he heard at school, and so we have a conversation about how colours are for everyone. The point is not only that children absorb what's going on around them and try to process it through an individual lens, but that how adults answer their questions plays a massive role in comprehension, too. Don't tell kids they're silly for asking these sorts of questions or act as if the truth is obvious: they're not, and it really isn't. But wont somebody think of the children?
Lowkey: kids, the animal world &gender
 This morning, my 5yo asked us if his new boy-kitten would grow up to be a
 daddy cat. We said that no, he wouldn't, and were about to explain that this is
 because the kitten is desexed when my son said, "Oh, that's right - because if
 you don't grow up to be a mummy or a daddy, then you're not a boy or a girl
 you're just a person!
 It turns out, he's been lowkey assuming that there are three grown-up
 genders: mummy, daddy, and adult, such that anyone who isn't a parent is, in
 some sense, nonbinary. We explained that, while he's right in thinking there
 are people who aren't boys or girls, your adult gender isn't determined by
 whether or not you have a kid, and used examples of people we know as
 proof. He accepted this with a nod, then went off to play with the kitten,
 We had a related conversation at bedtime last week, when the "story" he'd
 chosen was a book of facts about Australian animals. One of the entries we
 read was about the barramundi fish, which are all male as babies and only
 turn female during spawning season. This prompted him to ask if human boys
 could turn into girls, too, and while he was a bit too sleepy for a detailed
 conversation, I said something along the lines of, "yes, there are some people
 who look like boys when they're little, but who realise they're girls and change
 when they get older." He accepted that, too, and then we read another entry
 about a particular type of bat.
 These are only two small examples, but it's endlessly fascinating to me to
 watch how kids are trying to figure out what gender is and what it means from
 the world around them. There have been times when my son has come home
 saying that pink is for girls, because that's what he heard at school, and so we
 have a conversation about how colours are for everyone. The point is not only
 that children absorb what's going on around them and try to process it through
 an individual lens, but that how adults answer their questions plays a massive
 role in comprehension, too. Don't tell kids they're silly for asking these sorts of
 questions or act as if the truth is obvious: they're not, and it really isn't.
But wont somebody think of the children?

But wont somebody think of the children?

Lowkey: do older generations not get fatalistic humor?? like the other day my friend's parents were hanging around and we were joking and ¡ W:as like "well no matter what i can always fling myself off the nearest cliff and they didn't laugh then later the mom pulled me aside and was like "maybe you should get some help, sweetie" like stfu?? help? in this I honestly don't think they get it as a coping mechanism, they think it's a cry for help rather i'd even say it's past just coping and is also now a category of Stuff Kids Got Used To When No One Was Looking; not everyone using that humor is even covering up something bigger, we just stopped thinking along the line, and most parents don't seem My boss opened a door and missed me by inches, he said whoops, almost killed you there!" My result of "Oh, if only. Led to an as the goddamn Addams Family and the Family that lives next door and runs away screaming at the end of the episode I will say that it's interesting because this kind of hurnor is very, very prevalent Which is honestly a place you would expect fatalistic humor to be common and used as a coping method. You're one "oops away from death on the flight deck, one inch to the left and you don't have a head anymone because the jet that just landed now owns it as a wing-tip decoration. So you joke about it because lowkey you're fucking terrified it'll happen, but you're also desensitized to the danger itself because you face it every single day for 12 hours at a time. Anyway so we all know the mindset you adopt in the military because of the danger so to realise that an identical sense of humor has been adopted by normal people should about the amount of stress modem young It was also common in previous generations that had to deal with say, war and economic One of my favorite movies is Singing In The Rain which came in out 1952, right on the tailcoat of two world wars and a looming cold one, and for all it's a cheery happy musical, it's got this really bleak witty humor too, things like call me a cab! "okay, you're a cab! or the scene where Don says he'll be homeless by the next day and Cosmo cheerfully tells him not to be ridiculous.. the bank bailiffs And then quite probably one of my favorite opening lines, where two young girls are watching Lina on screen and one says "She's so refined. I think I'll kill myself Which really resonates with a lot of the things we say now when talking about people we find personally attractive, meaning not only is fatalism not a new trend, but those two girls at the starting sequence of Singing In The Rain are totally there for Lina, not Don So it's almost as if you can use fatalist humor as a sort of social atmosphere barometer. If fatalist humors starts to become Maybe sometimes it will be obvious, like during war times or in potentially dangerous it's less obvious, like the younger generation's views of their future. Either way, from all the comments above, it seems to have somehow emerged as a reliable measure of how things this explains a lot
Lowkey: do older generations not get fatalistic
 humor?? like the other day my friend's parents
 were hanging around and we were joking and
 ¡ W:as like "well no matter what i can always
 fling myself off the nearest cliff and they
 didn't laugh then later the mom pulled me
 aside and was like "maybe you should get
 some help, sweetie" like stfu?? help? in this
 I honestly don't think they get it as a coping
 mechanism, they think it's a cry for help rather
 i'd even say it's past just coping and is also
 now a category of Stuff Kids Got Used To
 When No One Was Looking; not everyone
 using that humor is even covering up
 something bigger, we just stopped thinking
 along the line, and most parents don't seem
 My boss opened a door and missed me by
 inches, he said whoops, almost killed you
 there!" My result of "Oh, if only. Led to an
 as the goddamn Addams Family and the
 Family that lives next door and runs away
 screaming at the end of the episode
 I will say that it's interesting because
 this kind of hurnor is very, very prevalent
 Which is honestly a place you would expect
 fatalistic humor to be common and used as
 a coping method. You're one "oops away
 from death on the flight deck, one inch to
 the left and you don't have a head anymone
 because the jet that just landed now owns it
 as a wing-tip decoration. So you joke about
 it because lowkey you're fucking terrified it'll
 happen, but you're also desensitized to the
 danger itself because you face it every single
 day for 12 hours at a time.
 Anyway so we all know the mindset you
 adopt in the military because of the danger
 so to realise that an identical sense of humor
 has been adopted by normal people should
 about the amount of stress modem young
 It was also common in previous generations
 that had to deal with say, war and economic
 One of my favorite movies is Singing In The
 Rain which came in out 1952, right on the
 tailcoat of two world wars and a looming cold
 one, and for all it's a cheery happy musical, it's
 got this really bleak witty humor too, things
 like call me a cab! "okay, you're a cab! or
 the scene where Don says he'll be homeless
 by the next day and Cosmo cheerfully tells
 him not to be ridiculous.. the bank bailiffs
 And then quite probably one of my favorite
 opening lines, where two young girls are
 watching Lina on screen and one says "She's
 so refined. I think I'll kill myself
 Which really resonates with a lot of the things
 we say now when talking about people we
 find personally attractive, meaning not only is
 fatalism not a new trend, but those two girls
 at the starting sequence of Singing In The
 Rain are totally there for Lina, not Don
 So it's almost as if you can use fatalist
 humor as a sort of social atmosphere
 barometer. If fatalist humors starts to become
 Maybe sometimes it will be obvious, like
 during war times or in potentially dangerous
 it's less obvious, like the younger generation's
 views of their future. Either way, from all the
 comments above, it seems to have somehow
 emerged as a reliable measure of how things
 this explains a lot

this explains a lot