🔥 | Latest

America, Comfortable, and Family: She Was the Richest Black Girl in the World and It's a Shame We Barely Know Her Name Did you Know? Sarah Rector-By the age of 10, she became the richest Black child in America. She received a land grant from the Creek Nation as part of reparations. Soon after, oil was discovered on her property. By 1912, the revenue from this oil was $371,000 per year (roughly $6.5 million today). Despite various attempts to steal her land and fortune, Sarah resisted. She went on to attend Tuskegee University and eventually settled in Kansas City, Missouri where her mansion still stands. Her name was Sarah Rector. She was a young black girl born in Indian Territory in 1902. Her parents were Joseph and Rose Rector, all of Taft, Indian Territory. Her story is similar to that of Danny Tucker another black child born in Indian Territory. He, like Sarah had a humble beginning, and he, like Sarah would make headlines for sudden wealth acquired by oil rich land. Early in her life, she received a land allotment like all who were members of the Creek Nation. Like thousands of blacks once held in bondage by the Five slave-holding tribes, (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole Nations) she and her family members received land allotments prior to Oklahoma statehood. It was a general practice that Freedmen often receive land considered to be of less value for farming as did citizens declared as Indians By Blood, and Inter-Married Whites. However, the story changed when oil was discovered on her land allotment, near Taft, Oklahoma. Her wealth caused immediate alarm and all efforts were made to put the child Sarah under "guardianship" of whites whose lives became comfortable immediately. Meanwhile Sarah still lived in humble surroundings. As white businessmen took control of her estate, efforts were also made to put her under control of officials at Tuskegee Institute. Much attention was given to Sarah in the press. In 1913, there was an effort to have her declared white, so that because of her millions she could ride in a first class car on the trains. Sarah's life continued as she began to get offers of marriage from around the world, and efforts were made to move her to Tuskegee. Because of the attention of the black press, her life eventually took a better turn, when individuals stepped in to intervene, and obtain a better lifetstyle for her. Not much is written about her adolescence, but it is know that she did attend Tuskegee Institute, and after she completed her studies there, she moved to Kansas City. In 1922, she married Kenneth Campbell. They were known to have many real estate holdings in the area. She and her husband purchased a home that still stands today in Kansas City. -blackpast.org SarahRector theblaquelioness
America, Comfortable, and Family: She Was the
 Richest Black
 Girl in the World
 and It's a Shame
 We Barely Know
 Her Name
 Did you Know?
 Sarah Rector-By the age of 10, she became the richest
 Black child in America. She received a land grant from the
 Creek Nation as part of reparations. Soon after, oil was
 discovered on her property. By 1912, the revenue from this
 oil was $371,000 per year (roughly $6.5 million today).
 Despite various attempts to steal her land and fortune,
 Sarah resisted. She went on to attend Tuskegee University
 and eventually settled in Kansas City, Missouri where her
 mansion still stands.
Her name was Sarah Rector. She was a young black girl born in Indian Territory in 1902. Her parents were Joseph and Rose Rector, all of Taft, Indian Territory. Her story is similar to that of Danny Tucker another black child born in Indian Territory. He, like Sarah had a humble beginning, and he, like Sarah would make headlines for sudden wealth acquired by oil rich land. Early in her life, she received a land allotment like all who were members of the Creek Nation. Like thousands of blacks once held in bondage by the Five slave-holding tribes, (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole Nations) she and her family members received land allotments prior to Oklahoma statehood. It was a general practice that Freedmen often receive land considered to be of less value for farming as did citizens declared as Indians By Blood, and Inter-Married Whites. However, the story changed when oil was discovered on her land allotment, near Taft, Oklahoma. Her wealth caused immediate alarm and all efforts were made to put the child Sarah under "guardianship" of whites whose lives became comfortable immediately. Meanwhile Sarah still lived in humble surroundings. As white businessmen took control of her estate, efforts were also made to put her under control of officials at Tuskegee Institute. Much attention was given to Sarah in the press. In 1913, there was an effort to have her declared white, so that because of her millions she could ride in a first class car on the trains. Sarah's life continued as she began to get offers of marriage from around the world, and efforts were made to move her to Tuskegee. Because of the attention of the black press, her life eventually took a better turn, when individuals stepped in to intervene, and obtain a better lifetstyle for her. Not much is written about her adolescence, but it is know that she did attend Tuskegee Institute, and after she completed her studies there, she moved to Kansas City. In 1922, she married Kenneth Campbell. They were known to have many real estate holdings in the area. She and her husband purchased a home that still stands today in Kansas City. -blackpast.org SarahRector theblaquelioness

Her name was Sarah Rector. She was a young black girl born in Indian Territory in 1902. Her parents were Joseph and Rose Rector, all of Taft...

Anaconda, At-St, and Chicago: Clara Belle Williams, the first black graduate of New Mexico State University. Many or her professors would not allow her inside the class room, she had to take notes from the hallway; she was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma. She became a great teacher, of black students by day, and by night she taught their parents (former slaves) home economics. she lived past 100, after her death, NMSU renamed the English Department building after her. Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent College, now (Prairie View A & M University) in 1908. Williams enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928, after taking some courses at the University of Chicago. While she worked as a teacher at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, she also took college courses during the summer. Most of Williams professors did not allow her inside the classroom because she was Black. But that didn’t stop Clara. She had to take notes from the hallway–standing up! That’s right, she wasn’t even given a chair to sit in many of those classes. She was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma because of the segregation laws. Despite what they did or said against her, she still graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from NMSU in 1937 at the age of 51. Williams went on to continue her education beyond her graduation date, taking graduate-level classes well into the 1950s. She married Jasper Williams in 1917. The couple raised three sons. She urged her sons to do well in school and succeed in higher education. All three of her children went to college and graduated with medical degrees. One attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C and the two other children graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They founded the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. . Her eldest son Dr. Jasper Williams, was chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago, a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, past president of the Cook County Physicians Association, and a founding director of the Seaway National Bank of Chicago, now the country’s largest black-owned bank. So you see, if it wasn’t for Clara’s dedication and perseverance, we would have never seen such excellence. via blackdoctor.org ClaraBelleWilliams theblaquelioness
Anaconda, At-St, and Chicago: Clara Belle Williams, the first black graduate of New
 Mexico State University. Many or her professors
 would not allow her inside the class room, she had to
 take notes from the hallway; she was also not allowed
 to walk with her class to get her diploma. She became
 a great teacher, of black students by day, and by night
 she taught their parents (former slaves) home
 economics. she lived past 100, after her death, NMSU
 renamed the English Department building after her.
Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent College, now (Prairie View A & M University) in 1908. Williams enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928, after taking some courses at the University of Chicago. While she worked as a teacher at Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, she also took college courses during the summer. Most of Williams professors did not allow her inside the classroom because she was Black. But that didn’t stop Clara. She had to take notes from the hallway–standing up! That’s right, she wasn’t even given a chair to sit in many of those classes. She was also not allowed to walk with her class to get her diploma because of the segregation laws. Despite what they did or said against her, she still graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English from NMSU in 1937 at the age of 51. Williams went on to continue her education beyond her graduation date, taking graduate-level classes well into the 1950s. She married Jasper Williams in 1917. The couple raised three sons. She urged her sons to do well in school and succeed in higher education. All three of her children went to college and graduated with medical degrees. One attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C and the two other children graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They founded the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. . Her eldest son Dr. Jasper Williams, was chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Bernard Hospital in Chicago, a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, past president of the Cook County Physicians Association, and a founding director of the Seaway National Bank of Chicago, now the country’s largest black-owned bank. So you see, if it wasn’t for Clara’s dedication and perseverance, we would have never seen such excellence. via blackdoctor.org ClaraBelleWilliams theblaquelioness

Clara Belle Williams was born in Texas in 1885. She was the valedictorian of the graduating class of Prairie New Normal and Independent Coll...