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on the same page: Andrew Rannells @AndrewRannells I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song, yes, you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem. BUT! Let's look closer! "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what shes really concerned about "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink -unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject mens advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so She states explicitly that she's resisting because shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did whats expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony, because they're both on the same page and they have been all along So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on 238,267 notes Dec 3rd, 2016 Its that time of year again
 on the same page: Andrew Rannells
 @AndrewRannells
 I don't think any more people
 need to record Baby It's Cold
 Outside. I think we're good there
 teachingwithcoffee
 It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem
 Masquerading As Christmas Carol
 bigbutterandeggman
 Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here
 Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s
 So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and
 applying today's worldview to the song, yes,
 you're right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape
 anthem.
 BUT! Let's look closer!
 "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the
 time, and the punchline was invariably that
 there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink,
 not even a significant amount of alcohol
 See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned,
 at a dudes house. In the 1940's, that's the kind
 of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do-and
 she wants people to think she's a good girl. The
 woman in the song says outright, multiple
 times, that what other people will think of her
 staying is what shes really concerned about
 "the neighbors might think" "my maiden aunt's
 mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk
 tomorrow." But she's having a really good time,
 and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing
 her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to
 the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink
 -unaware that the drink is actually really weak,
 maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke
 That is the standard joke that's going on when a
 woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th
 century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not
 a joke about how she's drunk and about to be
 raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly
 sober and about to have awesome consensual
 sex and use the drink for plausible deniability
 because she's living in a society where women
 aren't supposed to have sexual agency
 Basically, the song only makes sense in the
 context of a society in which women are
 expected to reject mens advances whether they
 actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal
 and expected for a lady's gentleman companion
 to pressure her despite her protests, because he
 knows she would have to say that whether or
 not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay
 she won't be able to justify doing so unless he
 offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying
 because I want to." (That's the main theme of
 the man's lines in the song, suggesting excuses
 she can use when people ask later why she
 spent the night at his house: it was so cold out,
 there were no cabs available, he simply insisted
 because he was concerned about my safety in
 such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent
 and definitely not about sex at all!) In this
 particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because
 the woman has a voice, and she's using it to
 give all the culturally-understood signals that
 she actually does want to stay but can't say so
 She states explicitly that she's resisting because
 shes supposed to, not because she wants to: "I
 ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly
 that she's just putting up a token resistance so
 she'll be able to claim later that she did whats
 expected of a decent woman in this situation:
 "at least I'm gonna say that I tried." And at the
 end of the song they're singing together, in
 harmony, because they're both on the same
 page and they have been all along
 So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's
 a song about a woman finding a way to exercise
 sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed
 to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the
 same time, one of the best illustrations of rape
 culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a
 song about a society where women aren't
 allowed to say yes..which happens to mean it's
 also a society where women don't have a clear
 and unambiguous way to say no
 Source: matchingvnecks #baby it's cold outside
 #not about rape #so tired of having to explain this on
 238,267 notes
 Dec 3rd, 2016
Its that time of year again

Its that time of year again

on the same page: I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there teachingwithcoffee It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Caral bigbutterandeggman Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today's worldview to the song. yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a rape anthem. BUTI Let's look closerl "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do - and she wants people to think she's a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she's really concerned about: the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk tomorrow." But she's having a really good time and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink - unaware that the drink is actually really weak maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke. That is the standard joke that's going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not a joke about how she's drunk and about to be raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she's living in a society where women aren't supposed to have sexual agency Basically, the song only makes sense in the ext of a society in which women are expected to reject men's advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it's normal and expected for a lady's gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the main theme of the man's lines in the song suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she's using it to give all the culturally- understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly that she's resisting because she's supposed to, not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she'll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the that she's resisting because she's supposed to not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no no..." She states explicitly that she's just putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able to claim later that she did what's expected of a decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the song they're singing together, in harmony because they're both on the same page and they have been all along. So it's not actually a song about rape in fact it's a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it's also, at the same time, one of the best llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It's a song about a society where women aren't allowed to say yes...which happens to mean it's also a society where women don't have a clear and unambiguous way to say no. Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside #not about rape #30 tired of having to explain this one 196,155 notes "C But Baby It’s Cold
 on the same page: I don't think any more people
 need to record Baby It's Cold
 Outside. I think we're good there
 teachingwithcoffee
 It's time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem
 Masquerading As Christmas Caral
 bigbutterandeggman
 Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also
 a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s
 So. Here's the thing. Given a cursory glance
 and applying today's worldview to the song.
 yes, you're right, it absolutely 'sounds' like a
 rape anthem.
 BUTI Let's look closerl
 "Hey what's in this drink" was a stock joke at
 the time, and the punchline was invariably that
 there's actually pretty much nothing in the drink,
 not even a significant amount of alcohol.
 See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned
 at a dude's house. In the 1940's, that's the kind
 of thing Good Girls aren't supposed to do -
 and she wants people to think she's a good girl.
 The woman in the song says outright, multiple
 times, that what other people will think of her
 staying is what she's really concerned about:
 the neighbors might think," "my maiden aunt's
 mind is vicious," "there's bound to be talk
 tomorrow." But she's having a really good time
 and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing
 her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to
 the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink
 - unaware that the drink is actually really weak
 maybe not even alcoholic at all. That's the joke.
 That is the standard joke that's going on when a
 woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th
 century says "hey, what's in this drink?" It is not
 a joke about how she's drunk and about to be
 raped. It's a joke about how she's perfectly
 sober and about to have awesome consensual
 sex and use the drink for plausible deniability
 because she's living in a society where women
 aren't supposed to have sexual agency
 Basically, the song only makes sense in the
 ext of a society in which women are
 expected to reject men's advances whether
 they actually want to or not, and therefore it's
 normal and expected for a lady's gentleman
 companion to pressure her despite her protests
 because he knows she would have to say that
 whether or not she meant it, and if she really
 wants to stay she won't be able to justify doing
 so unless he offers her an excuse other than
 "I'm staying because I want to." (That's the
 main theme of the man's lines in the song
 suggesting excuses she can use when people
 ask later why she spent the night at his house: it
 was so cold out, there were no cabs available,
 he simply insisted because he was concerned
 about my safety in such awful weather, it was
 perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex
 at all!) In this particular case, he's pretty clearly
 right, because the woman has a voice, and
 she's using it to give all the culturally-
 understood signals that she actually does want
 to stay but can't say so. She states explicitly
 that she's resisting because she's supposed to,
 not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no
 no..." She states explicitly that she's just
 putting up a token resistance so she'll be able
 to claim later that she did what's expected of a
 decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm
 oonna sav that I tried. And at the end of the
 that she's resisting because she's supposed to
 not because she wants to: "l ought to say no no
 no..." She states explicitly that she's just
 putting up a token resistance so she' ll be able
 to claim later that she did what's expected of a
 decent woman in this situation: "at least I'm
 gonna say thatI tried." And at the end of the
 song they're singing together, in harmony
 because they're both on the same page and
 they have been all along.
 So it's not actually a song about rape in fact
 it's a song about a woman finding a way to
 exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society
 designed to stop her from doing so. But it's
 also, at the same time, one of the best
 llustrations of rape culture that pop culture has
 ever produced. It's a song about a society
 where women aren't allowed to say yes...which
 happens to mean it's also a society where
 women don't have a clear and unambiguous
 way to say no.
 Source:matchinovnecks #baby it's cold outside
 #not about rape
 #30 tired of having to explain this one
 196,155 notes
 "C
But Baby It’s Cold

But Baby It’s Cold

on the same page: MILLIONAIKE MENTOR F SHE LOVES YOU WHETHER YOU'RE RICH OR BROKE, SHE'S A GOOD WOMAN 2 2 Someday you will meet a woman. She will feel like a lantern in a forest at night. She might be the woman who changes your life. Before you give her your heart forever, pause and look for these things: (Your boy mill mentor dropping some 🔑’s) ✔️Are your long term goals compatible? It is said that “love is the law,” but love is not the only key to happiness. If you are true to yourself and your passions, and she is too, there are plenty of ways your paths could divide. To force those paths from dividing could mean giving up on an important goal. Are your dreams compatible? ✔️Does she have her own interests? What if she doesn’t have long term goals or any strong interests? That could be a problem because it could mean she hasn’t grown or matured enough just yet. It could also mean she is resting much of her interest and expectation on you. Having someone willing to do anything you want to do gets old fast. ✔️Does she treat the two of you like a team? Having each of your own interests is healthy. But if she sees the two of you as a team of individuals, that’s great! It means she will give you space to follow your own dreams but also nurture the two of you as a team. Of course, you should see the two of you as a team as well. It really works best when both people are on the same page. ❤️ ✔️Can you have a conversation about anything? Any romantic partnership is still made up of individuals. Life will present awkward and sometimes scary situations where you need to talk things out. That’s not easy. But if you feel like you can’t talk about certain things at all, you are locking a part of yourself and she won’t have access to it. Communication is key. ✔️It’s totally crazy to think the two of you are always going to agree. A couple has to navigate religion, politics, parenting styles, family dynamics, a lot of complicated topics. If she always agrees with you that is a red flag. It could mean that she doesn’t have opinions or doesn’t feel comfortable sharing them with you. But if every disagreement turns into a heated argument that pulls up old issues, that’s an environment that feels unsafe and communication will collapse. Comment below!👇 - millionairementor
 on the same page: MILLIONAIKE MENTOR
 F SHE LOVES YOU
 WHETHER YOU'RE RICH
 OR BROKE, SHE'S A GOOD WOMAN
 2
 2
Someday you will meet a woman. She will feel like a lantern in a forest at night. She might be the woman who changes your life. Before you give her your heart forever, pause and look for these things: (Your boy mill mentor dropping some 🔑’s) ✔️Are your long term goals compatible? It is said that “love is the law,” but love is not the only key to happiness. If you are true to yourself and your passions, and she is too, there are plenty of ways your paths could divide. To force those paths from dividing could mean giving up on an important goal. Are your dreams compatible? ✔️Does she have her own interests? What if she doesn’t have long term goals or any strong interests? That could be a problem because it could mean she hasn’t grown or matured enough just yet. It could also mean she is resting much of her interest and expectation on you. Having someone willing to do anything you want to do gets old fast. ✔️Does she treat the two of you like a team? Having each of your own interests is healthy. But if she sees the two of you as a team of individuals, that’s great! It means she will give you space to follow your own dreams but also nurture the two of you as a team. Of course, you should see the two of you as a team as well. It really works best when both people are on the same page. ❤️ ✔️Can you have a conversation about anything? Any romantic partnership is still made up of individuals. Life will present awkward and sometimes scary situations where you need to talk things out. That’s not easy. But if you feel like you can’t talk about certain things at all, you are locking a part of yourself and she won’t have access to it. Communication is key. ✔️It’s totally crazy to think the two of you are always going to agree. A couple has to navigate religion, politics, parenting styles, family dynamics, a lot of complicated topics. If she always agrees with you that is a red flag. It could mean that she doesn’t have opinions or doesn’t feel comfortable sharing them with you. But if every disagreement turns into a heated argument that pulls up old issues, that’s an environment that feels unsafe and communication will collapse. Comment below!👇 - millionairementor

Someday you will meet a woman. She will feel like a lantern in a forest at night. She might be the woman who changes your life. Before yo...

on the same page: Andrew Rannells @AndrewRannells I don't think any more people need to record Baby It's Cold Outside. I think we're good there girlwholovesturtles: bigbutterandeggman: teachingwithcoffee: It’s time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s.  So. Here’s the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today’s worldview to the song, yes, you’re right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem.  BUT! Let’s look closer!  “Hey what’s in this drink” was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there’s actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dude’s house. In the 1940’s, that’s the kind of thing Good Girls aren’t supposed to do — and she wants people to think she’s a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she’s really concerned about: “the neighbors might think,” “my maiden aunt’s mind is vicious,” “there’s bound to be talk tomorrow.” But she’s having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink — unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That’s the joke. That is the standard joke that’s going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says “hey, what’s in this drink?” It is not a joke about how she’s drunk and about to be raped. It’s a joke about how she’s perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she’s living in a society where women aren’t supposed to have sexual agency. Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject men’s advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it’s normal and expected for a lady’s gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won’t be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than “I’m staying because I want to.” (That’s the main theme of the man’s lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he’s pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she’s using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can’t say so. She states explicitly that she’s resisting because she’s supposed to, not because she wants to: “I ought to say no no no…” She states explicitly that she’s just putting up a token resistance so she’ll be able to claim later that she did what’s expected of a decent woman in this situation: “at least I’m gonna say that I tried.” And at the end of the song they’re singing together, in harmony, because they’re both on the same page and they have been all along. So it’s not actually a song about rape - in fact it’s a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it’s also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It’s a song about a society where women aren’t allowed to say yes…which happens to mean it’s also a society where women don’t have a clear and unambiguous way to say no. I will never get tired of people actually paying attention to the actual meaning of this song.
 on the same page: Andrew Rannells
 @AndrewRannells
 I don't think any more people
 need to record Baby It's Cold
 Outside. I think we're good there
girlwholovesturtles:

bigbutterandeggman:
teachingwithcoffee:
It’s time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol
Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s. 
So. Here’s the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today’s worldview to the song, yes, you’re right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem. 
BUT! Let’s look closer! 
“Hey what’s in this drink” was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there’s actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol. 
See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dude’s house. In the 1940’s, that’s the kind of thing Good Girls aren’t supposed to do — and she wants people to think she’s a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she’s really concerned about: “the neighbors might think,” “my maiden aunt’s mind is vicious,” “there’s bound to be talk tomorrow.” But she’s having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink — unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That’s the joke. That is the standard joke that’s going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says “hey, what’s in this drink?” It is not a joke about how she’s drunk and about to be raped. It’s a joke about how she’s perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she’s living in a society where women aren’t supposed to have sexual agency.
Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject men’s advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it’s normal and expected for a lady’s gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won’t be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than “I’m staying because I want to.” (That’s the main theme of the man’s lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he’s pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she’s using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can’t say so. She states explicitly that she’s resisting because she’s supposed to, not because she wants to: “I ought to say no no no…” She states explicitly that she’s just putting up a token resistance so she’ll be able to claim later that she did what’s expected of a decent woman in this situation: “at least I’m gonna say that I tried.” And at the end of the song they’re singing together, in harmony, because they’re both on the same page and they have been all along.
So it’s not actually a song about rape - in fact it’s a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it’s also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It’s a song about a society where women aren’t allowed to say yes…which happens to mean it’s also a society where women don’t have a clear and unambiguous way to say no.


I will never get tired of people actually paying attention to the actual meaning of this song.

girlwholovesturtles: bigbutterandeggman: teachingwithcoffee: It’s time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Caro...

on the same page: u/Em3PO 6d i.redd.it l give you the cutest photo I've ever taken of my pup. U might date someone that is truly a nice person. Kind. Sweet. Sex game level = demon from hell who came to ruin u for all future partners 🤗. U feel me? Generous. Funny. But y'all fight. Y'all have discord. Y'all ain't on the same page. Y'all struggle. Y'all have them long text fights where u feel like a lawyer in a Brooks Brother suit in a federal courtroom but really u just on your West Elm sectional with the slightly busted leg leaning a lil bit while your dog keep you company and u furiously typing texts till your thumbs fall off while shoving scoops of your second Halo Top pint into your mouth. U love this person, but u hate them. There is no balance. Any small thing they do that is inconsiderate or could be construed to be so, u wil out and wanna kill them. What I've realized is, people are like food. If u have a nut allergy, u gon fuck around and eat a peanut and damn near suffocate and die a miserable, painful death. Someone who's not allergic gon eat that same peanut and be enriched and nutrified (yes I made that word up, deal with it 🤗). U feel me? Same food is toxic to one person and beneficial to another. The bottom line is, that person isn't arsenic - they ain't poison to all living creatures - they might just be poison to YOU because y'all ain't on the same page, were never on the same page, and never gon get on the same page (despite how hard y'all tried.) These are good people who u gotta block on all platforms and move on witchoe life because communication of any type gon fuck yo life up and u just gotta realize that not only can u not handle them by the handful, even one (1) nut could kill u 😂. Aight? Let that nut find another home. Her next partner might derive great benefit from that nut. Or he'll die a miserable death with four Epi Pens jammed into his thighs and 20 Benadryl in his system but if that's the case, it was his time 😢. YALL BE SAFE OUT THERE!! Bless up 😍😂😂😂
 on the same page: u/Em3PO 6d i.redd.it
 l give you the cutest photo I've ever taken of
 my pup.
U might date someone that is truly a nice person. Kind. Sweet. Sex game level = demon from hell who came to ruin u for all future partners 🤗. U feel me? Generous. Funny. But y'all fight. Y'all have discord. Y'all ain't on the same page. Y'all struggle. Y'all have them long text fights where u feel like a lawyer in a Brooks Brother suit in a federal courtroom but really u just on your West Elm sectional with the slightly busted leg leaning a lil bit while your dog keep you company and u furiously typing texts till your thumbs fall off while shoving scoops of your second Halo Top pint into your mouth. U love this person, but u hate them. There is no balance. Any small thing they do that is inconsiderate or could be construed to be so, u wil out and wanna kill them. What I've realized is, people are like food. If u have a nut allergy, u gon fuck around and eat a peanut and damn near suffocate and die a miserable, painful death. Someone who's not allergic gon eat that same peanut and be enriched and nutrified (yes I made that word up, deal with it 🤗). U feel me? Same food is toxic to one person and beneficial to another. The bottom line is, that person isn't arsenic - they ain't poison to all living creatures - they might just be poison to YOU because y'all ain't on the same page, were never on the same page, and never gon get on the same page (despite how hard y'all tried.) These are good people who u gotta block on all platforms and move on witchoe life because communication of any type gon fuck yo life up and u just gotta realize that not only can u not handle them by the handful, even one (1) nut could kill u 😂. Aight? Let that nut find another home. Her next partner might derive great benefit from that nut. Or he'll die a miserable death with four Epi Pens jammed into his thighs and 20 Benadryl in his system but if that's the case, it was his time 😢. YALL BE SAFE OUT THERE!! Bless up 😍😂😂😂

U might date someone that is truly a nice person. Kind. Sweet. Sex game level = demon from hell who came to ruin u for all future partner...