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Birthday, Tumblr, and Best: WHAT THEy DON'T UNDERSTAND ABouT BIrtHDAYS AnD wHAT they never tell you is that when you're eleven, you're also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when you wake up on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don't. Yotu open your eyes and everything's just like yesterday, only it's today. And you don't feel eleven at all. You feel like you're still ten. And you are-underneath the year that makes you eleven Like some days you might say something stupid, and that's the part of you that's still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama's lap because you're scared, and that's the part of you that's five. And maybe one day when you're all grown up maybe you will need to cry like if you're three, and that's okay. That's what I tell Mama when she's sad and needs to cry. Maybe she's feeling three. Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, each year inside the next one. That's how being eleven years old is You don't feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you don't feel smart eleven, not until you're almost twelve. That's the way it is. lose-in-my-world: aseaofquotes: Sandra Cisneros, “Eleven” the best thing i read today
Birthday, Tumblr, and Best: WHAT THEy DON'T UNDERSTAND ABouT BIrtHDAYS AnD wHAT
 they never tell you is that when you're eleven, you're also ten,
 and nine, and eight, and seven, and six, and five, and four, and
 three, and two, and one. And when you wake up on your
 eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don't. Yotu
 open your eyes and everything's just like yesterday, only it's
 today. And you don't feel eleven at all. You feel like you're still
 ten. And you are-underneath the year that makes you eleven
 Like some days you might say something stupid, and that's
 the part of you that's still ten. Or maybe some days you might
 need to sit on your mama's lap because you're scared, and that's
 the part of you that's five. And maybe one day when you're all
 grown up maybe you will need to cry like if you're three, and
 that's okay. That's what I tell Mama when she's sad and needs
 to cry. Maybe she's feeling three.
 Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like
 the rings inside a tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that
 fit one inside the other, each year inside the next one. That's
 how being eleven years old is
 You don't feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days,
 weeks even, sometimes even months before you say Eleven
 when they ask you. And you don't feel smart eleven, not until
 you're almost twelve. That's the way it is.
lose-in-my-world:

aseaofquotes:
Sandra Cisneros, “Eleven”

the best thing i read today

lose-in-my-world: aseaofquotes: Sandra Cisneros, “Eleven” the best thing i read today

Bad, Charlie, and Dove: No, It's Not 'Just Hair': Why We Need Laws to Protect Us Against Black Hair Discrimination MOST READ A Complete Timeline of 'Stranger Things' Couple Natalia Dyer and Charlie Heaton's Relationship in Photos Pervert Tries to Sexualize Billie Eilish, Twitter Takes Him Down 'The Hills' Audrina Patridge On Her Abusive Ex: 'I Gave Up Everything For Man Who Treated Me Like Sh*t 5 Women on What It's Like to Be Raped by a Boyfriend 'Good Girls': Loving Beth and Rio's Relationship Makes Me Feel Like a Bad Feminist femestella: California Gov. Gavin Newsom has officially signed the Crown Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) into law banning employers and schools from discriminating against natural hair. Yes, a law was passed that made the hair that naturally grows from Black people’s heads legal. According to beauty brand Dove, who has been the Crown Act’s biggest supporter, Black women are 50% more likely to be sent home from work because of their hairstyle. And they’re 80% more likely to change their hair by straightening or relaxing it so they can be more accepted by their peers at work. It sucks that our hair has been judged so much that we needed a law to protect us from discrimination. But maybe white people who wear traditional Black hairstyles will finally realize that their “it’s just hair” argument is completely invalid. Continue reading
Bad, Charlie, and Dove: No, It's Not 'Just Hair': Why We Need Laws
 to Protect Us Against Black Hair
 Discrimination
 MOST READ
 A Complete Timeline of 'Stranger Things' Couple
 Natalia Dyer and Charlie Heaton's Relationship in
 Photos
 Pervert Tries to Sexualize Billie Eilish, Twitter
 Takes Him Down
 'The Hills' Audrina Patridge On Her Abusive Ex: 'I
 Gave Up Everything For
 Man Who Treated Me
 Like Sh*t
 5 Women on What It's Like to Be Raped by a
 Boyfriend
 'Good Girls': Loving Beth and Rio's Relationship
 Makes Me Feel Like a Bad Feminist
femestella:
California Gov. Gavin Newsom has officially signed the Crown Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) into law banning employers and schools from discriminating against natural hair.
Yes, a law was passed that made the hair that naturally grows from Black people’s heads legal.
According to beauty brand Dove, who has been the Crown Act’s biggest supporter, Black women are 50% more likely to be sent home from work because of their hairstyle. And they’re 80% more likely to change their hair by straightening or relaxing it so they can be more accepted by their peers at work.
It sucks that our hair has been judged so much that we needed a law to protect us from discrimination. But maybe white people who wear traditional Black hairstyles will finally realize that their “it’s just hair” argument is completely invalid.
Continue reading

femestella: California Gov. Gavin Newsom has officially signed the Crown Act (Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair) into la...

News, Precious, and Target: OUL vladislava: mylistofthangs: Antique Jewish wedding rings.  These are absolutely gorgeous. Some info: Antique Jewish wedding bands are stellar examples of the artistry of jewelry making. The rings are made of a metal circle, molded to fit the would-be owner, topped with an architectural feature resembling a house. The goldsmith would then engrave something on the exterior of the “house”; engravings were also commonly hidden inside, in which case the “house” – or bezel – would slide open. The engraving would usually read Mazal Tov, or the Hebrew initials M.T. The rings’ houses varied in design from castle-like, to square, round or hexagonal. The structures were representations of either the Holy Temple or synagogues in the diaspora. Large in diameter and heavy due to the architectural features, many of the rings are practically unwearable. Morgan ponders the question as well, saying that there is no conclusive evidence, either in Jewish tradition or in the Christian documentation recording Jewish practices, of such rings ever having been worn. Trading in gold, jewels and precious stones was the trade of choice by wealthy Jewish merchants for hundreds of years. The memoir portrait of Gluckel of Hamlen, the daughter of a gold merchant of those times, depicts a wedding ring embroidered in gold thread, hanging from a necklace, which may have been the way the rings were worn after the wedding ceremony.  Jewish wedding bands are unique and although many of them are magnificent and expensive, none have stones set in them. The rings are devoid of their classical focal point due to a rabbinical ordinance barring setting gemstones in wedding bands, or engraving them with hallmarks – the latter first appearing in the 19th century. Also, Jewish goldsmiths were not allowed to join guilds and mark their creations until circa that time. (via)
News, Precious, and Target: OUL
vladislava:

mylistofthangs:

Antique Jewish wedding rings. 

These are absolutely gorgeous.
Some info:

Antique Jewish wedding bands are stellar examples of the artistry of jewelry making. The rings are made of a metal circle, molded to fit the would-be owner, topped with an architectural feature resembling a house. The goldsmith would then engrave something on the exterior of the “house”; engravings were also commonly hidden inside, in which case the “house” – or bezel – would slide open. The engraving would usually read Mazal Tov, or the Hebrew initials M.T.

The rings’ houses varied in design from castle-like, to square, round or hexagonal. The structures were representations of either the Holy Temple or synagogues in the diaspora.
Large in diameter and heavy due to the architectural features, many of the rings are practically unwearable. Morgan ponders the question as well, saying that there is no conclusive evidence, either in Jewish tradition or in the Christian documentation recording Jewish practices, of such rings ever having been worn.
Trading in gold, jewels and precious stones was the trade of choice by wealthy Jewish merchants for hundreds of years. The memoir portrait of Gluckel of Hamlen, the daughter of a gold merchant of those times, depicts a wedding ring embroidered in gold thread, hanging from a necklace, which may have been the way the rings were worn after the wedding ceremony. 
Jewish wedding bands are unique and although many of them are magnificent and expensive, none have stones set in them. The rings are devoid of their classical focal point due to a rabbinical ordinance barring setting gemstones in wedding bands, or engraving them with hallmarks – the latter first appearing in the 19th century. Also, Jewish goldsmiths were not allowed to join guilds and mark their creations until circa that time. (via)

vladislava: mylistofthangs: Antique Jewish wedding rings.  These are absolutely gorgeous. Some info: Antique Jewish wedding bands are st...