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prejudice: clover11-10: breezeinmonochromenight: star-linedsoul: razzleberryjam: ironwoman359: chaos-in-the-making: smugkoalas: allthefandomss: that-catholic-shinobi: gahdamnpunk: American Girl stories were the best tbh Dude, read the books, she and her mom freed themselves in Book 1. We don’t disrespect American Girl in this house Don’t you dare disrespect Addy, or any of my girls for that matter. American Girl used to be legit. Good stories, good dolls, good movies. Felicity’s story was set in the beginnings of the American Revolution, and addressed the conflict that she faced when her loved ones were split between patriots and loyalists. It also covered the effects of animal abuse, and forgiving those who are unforgivable. Samantha’s stories centered around the growth of industrial America, women’s suffrage, child abuse, and corruption in places of power. Also, it emphasises how dramatically adoption into a caring family can turn a life around. Kit’s story is one of my favorites. Her family is hit hard by the Great Depression, and they begin taking in boarders and raise chickens to help make ends meet. Her books include themes of poverty, police brutality, homelessness, prejudice, and the importance of unity in difficult times. Molly’s father, a doctor, is drafted during the Second World War. Throughout her story, friends of hers suffer the loss of their husbands, sons, and brothers overseas. Her mother leaves the traditional housewife position and works full-time to help with the war effort. They also take in an English refugee child, who learns to open up after a life of traumatic experience. American Girl stories have always featured the very harsh realities of America through the years. But they’re always presented honestly, yet in ways that kids can understand. They just go to show that you don’t have to live in a perfect time to be a real American girl. Dont you fucking dare disrespect the American Girls in my house. ESPECIALLY Addy!! That was my first REAL contact with the horrors of slavery, as I read about her father being whipped and sold and her mother escaping with her to freedom, but also how freedom was still a struggle. A slave doll. Please. Read the books. Don’t forget Kirsten, the Swedish immigrant who had to deal with balancing her own culture and learning the english language and customs of her classmates, or Kaya (full name Kaya'aton'my, or She Who Arranges Rocks) , the brave but careless girl from the Nez Perce tribe, or Josefina, the Mexican girl learning to be a healer. And then there are the later dolls, that kids younger than me would have grown up with (I was just outgrowing American Girl as these came out), like Rebecca, the Jewish girl who dreams of becoming an actress in the budding film industry, or  Julie, who fights against her school’s gender policy surrounding sports in the 70s, or  Nanea, the Hawaiian girl whose father worked at Pearl Harbor. These books, these characters, are fantastic pictures into life for girls in America throughout the years, they pull no punches with the horrors that these girls had to face in their different time periods, and in many cases I learned more history from these series than social studies at school. And that’s without even mentioning the “girl of the year” series where characters are created in the modern world to help girls deal with issues like friend problems, moving, or bullying. We do NOT disrespect American Girl in this house. American Girl is probably going to be the only exposure young girls are going to get to history from a female perspective. This is actually kind of important considering that in history classes we dont really get that exposure. We dont hear about what women felt and endured during these time periods cause schools are too busy teaching us about what happened from the male perspective, which is not unimportant, but we need both. Girls need both. These books were such a crucial part of my childhood and shaped my love of history, which still ensures today. These books can be a young girl’s first lessons in diversity and cultural awareness (hopefully burying that insensitive “we’re all Americans” tripe) and looking at history from more perspectives than just that taught in school. They also are an example of how women have ALWAYS been part of history, which some people would rather us not believe. I think Kit and Kaya were the newest American Girls when I started “aging out” of the books, but hearing about some of these kinda makes me want to revisit them! I wasn’t gonna say anything, but you know what? Nah. OP (of the tweet thread) was either a actively trying to start shit or is just a huge fucking moron. Probably both. I’d like to point out that the company that makes American Girl dolls actually doesn’t skimp when doing their research and they don’t make the dolls with the intent to be offensive in any way: I loved American Girl growing up they’re great role models and history lessons so yeah let’s not cancel this for ignorant reasons
prejudice: clover11-10:

breezeinmonochromenight:

star-linedsoul:

razzleberryjam:

ironwoman359:

chaos-in-the-making:

smugkoalas:


allthefandomss:

that-catholic-shinobi:

gahdamnpunk:
American Girl stories were the best tbh

Dude, read the books, she and her mom freed themselves in Book 1. We don’t disrespect American Girl in this house 


Don’t you dare disrespect Addy, or any of my girls for that matter. American Girl used to be legit. Good stories, good dolls, good movies. 


Felicity’s story was set in the beginnings of the American Revolution, and addressed the conflict that she faced when her loved ones were split between patriots and loyalists. It also covered the effects of animal abuse, and forgiving those who are unforgivable. 
Samantha’s stories centered around the growth of industrial America, women’s suffrage, child abuse, and corruption in places of power. Also, it emphasises how dramatically adoption into a caring family can turn a life around. 
Kit’s story is one of my favorites. Her family is hit hard by the Great Depression, and they begin taking in boarders and raise chickens to help make ends meet. Her books include themes of poverty, police brutality, homelessness, prejudice, and the importance of unity in difficult times. 
Molly’s father, a doctor, is drafted during the Second World War. Throughout her story, friends of hers suffer the loss of their husbands, sons, and brothers overseas. Her mother leaves the traditional housewife position and works full-time to help with the war effort. They also take in an English refugee child, who learns to open up after a life of traumatic experience. 
American Girl stories have always featured the very harsh realities of America through the years. But they’re always presented honestly, yet in ways that kids can understand. They just go to show that you don’t have to live in a perfect time to be a real American girl. 


Dont you fucking dare disrespect the American Girls in my house. ESPECIALLY Addy!! That was my first REAL contact with the horrors of slavery, as I read about her father being whipped and sold and her mother escaping with her to freedom, but also how freedom was still a struggle.
A slave doll. Please. Read the books. 

Don’t forget Kirsten, the Swedish immigrant who had to deal with balancing her own culture and learning the english language and customs of her classmates, or Kaya (full name 

Kaya'aton'my, or She Who Arranges Rocks) , the brave but careless girl from the Nez Perce tribe, or Josefina, the Mexican girl learning to be a healer.
And then there are the later dolls, that kids younger than me would have grown up with (I was just outgrowing American Girl as these came out), like Rebecca, the Jewish girl who dreams of becoming an actress in the budding film industry, or 

Julie, who fights against her school’s gender policy surrounding sports in the 70s, or 

Nanea, the Hawaiian girl whose father worked at Pearl Harbor.
These books, these characters, are fantastic pictures into life for girls in America throughout the years, they pull no punches with the horrors that these girls had to face in their different time periods, and in many cases I learned more history from these series than social studies at school. And that’s without even mentioning the “girl of the year” series where characters are created in the modern world to help girls deal with issues like friend problems, moving, or bullying. We do NOT disrespect American Girl in this house.


American Girl is probably going to be the only exposure young girls are going to get to history from a female perspective. This is actually kind of important considering that in history classes we dont really get that exposure. We dont hear about what women felt and endured during these time periods cause schools are too busy teaching us about what happened from the male perspective, which is not unimportant, but we need both. Girls need both.



These books were such a crucial part of my childhood and shaped my love of history, which still ensures today. These books can be a young girl’s first  lessons in diversity and cultural awareness (hopefully burying that insensitive “we’re all Americans” tripe) and looking at history from more perspectives than just that taught in school. They also are an example of how women have ALWAYS been part of history, which some people would rather us not believe.
I think Kit and Kaya were the newest American Girls when I started “aging out” of the books, but hearing about some of these kinda makes me want to revisit them!

I wasn’t gonna say anything, but you know what? 
Nah.
OP (of the tweet thread) was either a actively trying to start shit or is just a huge fucking moron. Probably both.
I’d like to point out that the company that makes American Girl dolls actually doesn’t skimp when doing their research and they don’t make the dolls with the intent to be offensive in any way:





I loved American Girl growing up they’re great role models and history lessons so yeah let’s not cancel this for ignorant reasons

clover11-10: breezeinmonochromenight: star-linedsoul: razzleberryjam: ironwoman359: chaos-in-the-making: smugkoalas: allthefandom...

prejudice: Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice
prejudice: Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice

Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice

prejudice: Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice
prejudice: Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice

Apparently ‘Karen’ is a slur for women hating and based on class prejudice

prejudice: I had the audacity to say we need to stand together in this time of crisis and said she was prejudice against others. Woke up to this rant
prejudice: I had the audacity to say we need to stand together in this time of crisis and said she was prejudice against others. Woke up to this rant

I had the audacity to say we need to stand together in this time of crisis and said she was prejudice against others. Woke up to this rant

prejudice: Pride & Prejudice style
prejudice: Pride & Prejudice style

Pride & Prejudice style

prejudice: No Mongolian prejudice here, Turks are good
prejudice: No Mongolian prejudice here, Turks are good

No Mongolian prejudice here, Turks are good

prejudice: Hypocrisy is the mother of all evil and racial prejudice is still her favourite child. -Don King [3358 × 1834] (Artist Dana Ellyn)
prejudice: Hypocrisy is the mother of all evil and racial prejudice is still her favourite child. -Don King [3358 × 1834] (Artist Dana Ellyn)

Hypocrisy is the mother of all evil and racial prejudice is still her favourite child. -Don King [3358 × 1834] (Artist Dana Ellyn)

prejudice: Tachanka destroying Shock Drone with an appropriate amount of prejudice
prejudice: Tachanka destroying Shock Drone with an appropriate amount of prejudice

Tachanka destroying Shock Drone with an appropriate amount of prejudice

prejudice: "Yeah, because targeted prejudice towards a group of people BECAUSE OF THEIR SKIN COLOR isn't racism!"
prejudice: "Yeah, because targeted prejudice towards a group of people BECAUSE OF THEIR SKIN COLOR isn't racism!"

"Yeah, because targeted prejudice towards a group of people BECAUSE OF THEIR SKIN COLOR isn't racism!"

prejudice: Disabled people are dumb, democrats good people. It’s not prejudice against disabled people. Another proof they only use vulnerable people as an argument and actually, don’t really care about them.
prejudice: Disabled people are dumb, democrats good people. It’s not prejudice against disabled people. Another proof they only use vulnerable people as an argument and actually, don’t really care about them.

Disabled people are dumb, democrats good people. It’s not prejudice against disabled people. Another proof they only use vulnerable peopl...

prejudice: White people are "prejudice people"
prejudice: White people are "prejudice people"

White people are "prejudice people"

prejudice: Prejudice is not cool.
prejudice: Prejudice is not cool.

Prejudice is not cool.

prejudice: I’ll take prejudice for 200 Alex
prejudice: I’ll take prejudice for 200 Alex

I’ll take prejudice for 200 Alex

prejudice: Prejudice set to maximum.
prejudice: Prejudice set to maximum.

Prejudice set to maximum.

prejudice: Damn prejudice
prejudice: Damn prejudice

Damn prejudice

prejudice: We are very liberal and have no prejudice
prejudice: We are very liberal and have no prejudice

We are very liberal and have no prejudice

prejudice: Posted in my towns Facebook page today...”not prejudice but” is a good indicator to stop talking
prejudice: Posted in my towns Facebook page today...”not prejudice but” is a good indicator to stop talking

Posted in my towns Facebook page today...”not prejudice but” is a good indicator to stop talking

prejudice: Anti-crab prejudice (or, Crab suffrage NOW!)
prejudice: Anti-crab prejudice (or, Crab suffrage NOW!)

Anti-crab prejudice (or, Crab suffrage NOW!)

prejudice: Pride and Prejudice
prejudice: Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

prejudice: Gotta drop the prejudice
prejudice: Gotta drop the prejudice

Gotta drop the prejudice

prejudice: Had to make a meme on Pride and Prejudice with strict guidelines for English, what do you guys think?
prejudice: Had to make a meme on Pride and Prejudice with strict guidelines for English, what do you guys think?

Had to make a meme on Pride and Prejudice with strict guidelines for English, what do you guys think?

prejudice: You must be strongly prejudice
prejudice: You must be strongly prejudice

You must be strongly prejudice

prejudice: "I ate a slice of prejudice with some fava beans and a nice Chianti."
prejudice: "I ate a slice of prejudice with some fava beans and a nice Chianti."

"I ate a slice of prejudice with some fava beans and a nice Chianti."

prejudice: “If you don’t mind me saying, how on earth would you know? As someone who’s never had to deal with ingrained prejudice?"
prejudice: “If you don’t mind me saying, how on earth would you know? As someone who’s never had to deal with ingrained prejudice?"

“If you don’t mind me saying, how on earth would you know? As someone who’s never had to deal with ingrained prejudice?"

prejudice: BIUA Arial 11 Normal text 7. 4. A majority of people don't necessarily like horror movies, due to the themes of violence and gore. Ask anyone who does appreciate it however, and they'll probably say that they like it for the shock value and don't take it too seriously. They are not violent people, and the movies in no way inspire them to be violent. This also applies most metal music too, despite ignorant people thinking otherwise. With band names like "Cattle Decapitation" "Dying fetus" "Goat Whore or "Brain Drill" (a local band from Ben Lomend by the way) it should come as a surprise that some people take them seriously. Believing them to be violent people due to violent lyrics is just as abserb of accusing horror movie directors of being blood-thirsty crazies. The same applies to the fans of both as well.This prejudice goes way back, to some of the first bands in the metal scene. Most of you probably recognize the band "Black Sabbath" for its characteristically doom n gloom sounding music and lyrical themes. Its name alone brings to mind the idea of a satanic ritual. Satanism for shock value has long been a theme in metal, but a symbol of rebellion against the norm. Like a metaphor for free-thinking. But a little bit of research will reveal that Ozzy Osborne himself is actually a life-long Catholic. In the starting days of Black Sabbath, Ozzy even asked his dad to make him and his band mates a bunch of aluminum crosses to wear on stage, to show that they were indeed not a Satanic band. To this day, the cross he wears is almost as iconic as his circular purple shades. Keep in mind this is the same band with songs like "Children of the Grave" and "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath". you This trend of misunderstood shock-value continued Into the 80's and 90's when bands were developing harsh vocals (the cookie monster sounding growls) and blast beats (the machine gun sound of a skilled double-bass drummer). The main band that popularized this style of playing was "Death" which became the model for the death metal genre. In a 1995 interview, Death's founder Chuck Schuldiner stated "Tm not a Satanist and I definitely don't put that into our music on purpose. I was never really into writing Satanic lyrics at all, personally. We did write gore lyrics, but it was more like kind of tongue-in-cheek, horror-movie type level. Nothing like encouraging people to go out and hurt themselves or anything stupid like that." Speech I’m working on. Hope no one brings up Mayhem or Watain. Thoughts thus far?
prejudice: BIUA
 Arial
 11
 Normal text
 7.
 4.
 A majority of people don't necessarily like horror movies, due to the themes of violence
 and gore. Ask anyone who does appreciate it however, and they'll probably say that they like it
 for the shock value and don't take it too seriously. They are not violent people, and the movies
 in no way inspire them to be violent. This also applies most metal music too, despite ignorant
 people thinking otherwise. With band names like "Cattle Decapitation" "Dying fetus" "Goat Whore
 or "Brain Drill" (a local band from Ben Lomend by the way) it should come as a surprise that
 some people take them seriously.
 Believing them to be violent people due to violent lyrics is just as abserb of accusing
 horror movie directors of being blood-thirsty crazies. The same applies to the fans of both as
 well.This prejudice goes way back, to some of the first bands in the metal scene. Most of you
 probably recognize the band "Black Sabbath" for its characteristically doom n gloom sounding
 music and lyrical themes. Its name alone brings to mind the idea of a satanic ritual. Satanism for
 shock value has long been a theme in metal, but a symbol of rebellion against the norm. Like a
 metaphor for free-thinking. But a little bit of research will reveal that Ozzy Osborne himself is
 actually a life-long Catholic. In the starting days of Black Sabbath, Ozzy even asked his dad to
 make him and his band mates a bunch of aluminum crosses to wear on stage, to show that they
 were indeed not a Satanic band. To this day, the cross he wears is almost as iconic as his
 circular purple shades. Keep in mind this is the same band with songs like "Children of the
 Grave" and "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath".
 you
 This trend of misunderstood shock-value continued Into the 80's and 90's when bands
 were developing harsh vocals (the cookie monster sounding growls) and blast beats (the
 machine gun sound of a skilled double-bass drummer). The main band that popularized this style
 of playing was "Death" which became the model for the death metal genre. In a 1995 interview,
 Death's founder Chuck Schuldiner stated "Tm not a Satanist and I definitely don't put that into
 our music on purpose. I was never really into writing Satanic lyrics at all, personally. We did write
 gore lyrics, but it was more like kind of tongue-in-cheek, horror-movie type level. Nothing like
 encouraging people to go out and hurt themselves or anything stupid like that."
Speech I’m working on. Hope no one brings up Mayhem or Watain. Thoughts thus far?

Speech I’m working on. Hope no one brings up Mayhem or Watain. Thoughts thus far?

prejudice: Caught Percy napping while my roommate and I watched "Pride and Prejudice".
prejudice: Caught Percy napping while my roommate and I watched "Pride and Prejudice".

Caught Percy napping while my roommate and I watched "Pride and Prejudice".

prejudice: now you kno! In 2002, Kenyan Masai tribespeople donated 14 cows to to the US. to help with the aftermath of 9/11. the-treble That was super nice of them. And now I'm mad that nobody told us we were given cows. Cause that's really f*cking nice and nobody mentioned it at all. A obese-starving-artist American media tends to disregard that anyone donates to the US. And then Amurricans complain about money going abroad because "nobody helped the US in our disasters." Also, do you know how much a cow costs? 0.0 awesomonster It isn't just a matter of how much a cow costs, its a matter of considering that Masai life is based around their cattle. Its their wealth, their food, and a significant part of their religion. Here's a quote from Wikipedia: "Traditional Maasai lifestyle centres around their cattle which constitute their primary source of food. The measure of a man's wealth is in terms of cattle and children. A herd of 50 cattle is respectable, and the more children the better. A man who has plenty of one but not the other is considered to be poor. 137) A Maasai religious belief relates that God gave them all the cattle on earth, leading to the belief that rustling cattle from other tribes is a matter of taking back what is rightfully theirs, a practice that has become much less common. [38]" So its not just "they gave us 14 cows", its that they gave us something that is very important and significant to them, it is more than just a kind gesture that definitely deserves to be known and its a genuine shame that more people don't know about it. gweatherwax Wait, you guys DON'T KNOW that we offer help to the US when you have disasters??????? Shit, down here in Brazil we not only offered to send tracking units and doctors to help in 9/11 but we wanted to send a whole lot of donations to help with Katrina (we have experience with floods down here so we knew what kind of medicine to send to prevent outbreaks). We alone had like 2 army airplanes full of medicine and non-perishables like baby formula, diapers, bottled water, mosquito nets and other stuff that's needed to fight opportunistic diseases that hit flooded areas, enough to assist a good few thousand people at least, ready to go the day after it hit, but your government refused the donations. The same thing happened to the Canadians and Europeans who offered help, the US embassies around the world told us all to give money to Red Cross. And so we did, we all gave hundreds of millions of dollars to them, and then this happened: Red Cross scandals tarnish relief efforts "Breathtaking' Waste and Fraud in Hurricane Aid So please, don't you go spreading misinformation and prejudice against the rest of the world, WE DID OFFER HELP AND ORGANIZED IT EVEN FASTER THAN BUSH DID, BUT Y'ALL REFUSED IT. A randomthingsthatilike123 Oh wow I had no idea this happened it's really not talked about in media at all wow this is something good to know about wow jadedhavok I'm so angry. I didn't know that other countries tried to help after 9/11 or Katrina. Like, that's something we, the people, should hear about and we don't. Please don't blame us for the shitty decisions our government makes. We don't have as much control over our government as we would like to think and they keep a lot from us. deadcatwithaflamethrower Spread this shit. natrsrants After Katrina, Cuba donated several hundred blankets. Think about that. A country that is suffering economically due directly to the US embargo offered to help us when we needed it by sending what they could. And once again, it was refused. We have a government that is so self-righteous that we refuse to accept disaster aid in order to maintain this facade that we are the most generous nation on earth. disputedthreshermaw Okay, Katrina thing. Only Texans really knows this? and even then it's not wide spread. Mexico sent their army. They sent their army for relief efforts. Didn't call ahead, they drove all the way to San Antonio with doctors and food and all sorts of supplies. When people actually got a call from them saying "Hey, we're sending people up." The people who answered said "What? We can't." "Too late, already there." This was while the government was turning down help. So yeah, other countries send relief. Forest fires up in Washington last year? Firefighters from Australia came up to assist. Like.. we don't hear about this shit. At all. mehofkirkwall I can second the above with the fires. Most the time, when people say "oh FEMA or something sent people right?" re: fires, its actually people from other countries showing up and kinda ignoring the government telling them to fuck off and staying on behalf of local departments because we REALLY need them. If there's a huge ass disaster, and the government is sitting there with a thumb up it's ass, help is offered and most the time- shit, it gets there! But then the feds do something really fucking dirty. They insist they were the help, if it's talked about at all. They insist those people putting out fires were federal people, because to most people a fireman's a fireman. The people handing out water and food, a relief worker is a relief worker. So on and so forth. We had people come up when the fires were so bad a while ago- not the Australians, but i think there was like a German group of like 3 guys that flew themselves over? They came out of sheer "this is horrible and we're helping" and my dad [local fire chief] had them working with our guys and the feds lost no time telling every news outlet that it was THEIR people doing all the fire knockdowns and structure work when these guys were running into buildings and grabbing people, pets, and people's important documents because they knew papers were a pain in the ass to replace. What you gotta understand is that our government is very intent on selling us and the rest of the world [as much as possible] the idea of a powerful and self reliant country. All our reporting on disasters, starts with the scaremongering and then moves to "but our people can handle it because we're the best at handling things" and then they move on before the idea it's out of control comes to mind. The average person outside of the disaster has no idea, if they have never been around such an event or met someone who regularly deals with these things, they will kinda probably nod along with that. Because we have no real scope on the scale and impact- by design. Our media intake is very controlled to slant everything to the "eh, we can handle it and everyone else out there- they need our help because they're not so good at handling disasters like we are." People who know better, reading international news, interacting with international social groups, looking outside their sphere of community- we know better but that kinda slant is really hard to break from because of that grip American media has on information. So, taking that knowledge, we further have restricted reporting on certain disasters because they're considered unimportant. Hurricanes are considered important, earthquakes are only considered important if it wrecks something the government cares about or somewhere a couple million people live that they'll upset the national money flow/they can throw money at someone to make the news care, floods are only important if it's in a similar manner to earthquakes but since they occur annually they're rarely reported on nationally, mudslides that kill people or leave hundreds homeless aren't important to the government even through they happen constantly, wildfires that consume most of the nation/continent each year generally are unimportant until they consume a town or threaten a government interest/money flow location. Terrorist attacks are always important because people will talk about them. So, when we do get help for any of the above, it's possible that most people may have no idea about what's happened, let alone that help's been sent. Or if people know something happened, the details are vague- the news don't care to give the nitty gritty. You'll know something happened and people are suffering and "gee, isn't it good you're not them" and then now the weather. So, yeah, basically no one really knows we get help. petitepenquin International response to Hurricane Katrina: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_response_to_Hurricane_Katrina We got HELLA help, but nobody really talks about it evilelitest2 American Media really fails regularly iammyfather Hurricane Sandy, Quebec sends power line crews down to assist in restoring power. California gets rid of water bombers due to budget cuts, Canada sends theirs down to help fight wild fires. Amazing what living on the border and having outside TV News does to your information flow. cyanwrites After Katrina, Denmark offered to donate water purification units so people wouldn't get sick from drinking contaminated water, but the offer was declined. A private Danish company built a mobile satellite phone booth and drove it around the poor neighbourhoods in Mississippi and Louisiana so people could call their families and insurance companies for free (apparently there was a deadline for reporting damages but people couldn't call in because their mobile phones were dead and landlines were down). markingatlightspeed American propaganda is not a thing of the past, nor is it a new thing. It has been around forever, telling stories of exceptionalism and self-reliance while our government tries its hardest to refuse the help of others and offer its own to them, to try and force other nations onto their back foot and remain aggressively benevolent in international matters, so that it can lord that shit over them in negotiations and the media in general. I guarantee you America would have a less jingoistic, less xenophobic populace overall if this sort of information were actually reported to us. If we weren't always fed the lie of helping the world without any gratitude or help in return. If the media didn't present us as world police and instead as a part of the community, as other countries try hard to include us as, then maybe Americans would actually act like they're part of a fucking community. But global citizens are hard to monger fear and distrust and xenophobia and nationalism with. They're hard to control with propaganda and hate. They're hard to keep ignorant and docile and saying "this is fine" while the empire burns. A lot of Americans wonder why our country is seen as a worldwide bully. Shit like that, my friends. Shit like that Its hubris is seemingly limitless. velocicrafter COMMENTARY stay mfing woke
prejudice: now you kno!
 In 2002, Kenyan Masai tribespeople
 donated 14 cows to to the US.
 to help with the aftermath of 9/11.
 the-treble
 That was super nice of them.
 And now I'm mad that nobody told us we were given cows. Cause that's really
 f*cking nice and nobody mentioned it at all.
 A obese-starving-artist
 American media tends to disregard that anyone donates to the US. And then
 Amurricans complain about money going abroad because "nobody helped the
 US in our disasters."
 Also, do you know how much a cow costs? 0.0
 awesomonster
 It isn't just a matter of how much a cow costs, its a matter of considering that
 Masai life is based around their cattle. Its their wealth, their food, and a
 significant part of their religion. Here's a quote from Wikipedia:
 "Traditional Maasai lifestyle centres around their cattle which constitute their
 primary source of food. The measure of a man's wealth is in terms of cattle and
 children. A herd of 50 cattle is respectable, and the more children the better. A
 man who has plenty of one but not the other is considered to be poor. 137) A
 Maasai religious belief relates that God gave them all the cattle on earth,
 leading to the belief that rustling cattle from other tribes is a matter of taking
 back what is rightfully theirs, a practice that has become much less common.
 [38]"
 So its not just "they gave us 14 cows", its that they gave us something that is
 very important and significant to them, it is more than just a kind gesture that
 definitely deserves to be known and its a genuine shame that more people
 don't know about it.
 gweatherwax
 Wait, you guys DON'T KNOW that we offer help to the
 US when you have disasters???????
 Shit, down here in Brazil we not only offered to send tracking units and doctors
 to help in 9/11 but we wanted to send a whole lot of donations to help with
 Katrina (we have experience with floods down here so we knew what kind of
 medicine to send to prevent outbreaks).
 We alone had like 2 army airplanes full of medicine and non-perishables like
 baby formula, diapers, bottled water, mosquito nets and other stuff that's
 needed to fight opportunistic diseases that hit flooded areas, enough to assist a
 good few thousand people at least, ready to go the day after it hit, but your
 government refused the donations.
 The same thing happened to the Canadians and Europeans who offered help,
 the US embassies around the world told us all to give money to Red Cross.
 And so we did, we all gave hundreds of millions of dollars to them, and then
 this happened:
 Red Cross scandals tarnish relief efforts
 "Breathtaking' Waste and Fraud in Hurricane Aid
 So please, don't you go spreading misinformation and prejudice against the
 rest of the world, WE DID OFFER HELP AND ORGANIZED IT EVEN FASTER
 THAN BUSH DID, BUT Y'ALL REFUSED IT.
 A randomthingsthatilike123
 Oh wow I had no idea this happened it's really not talked about in media at all
 wow this is something good to know about wow
 jadedhavok
 I'm so angry.
 I didn't know that other countries tried to help after 9/11 or Katrina. Like, that's
 something we, the people, should hear about and we don't.
 Please don't blame us for the shitty decisions our government makes. We don't
 have as much control over our government as we would like to think and they
 keep a lot from us.
 deadcatwithaflamethrower
 Spread this shit.
 natrsrants
 After Katrina, Cuba donated several hundred blankets. Think about that. A
 country that is suffering economically due directly to the US embargo offered to
 help us when we needed it by sending what they could. And once again, it was
 refused. We have a government that is so self-righteous that we refuse to
 accept disaster aid in order to maintain this facade that we are the most
 generous nation on earth.
 disputedthreshermaw
 Okay, Katrina thing.
 Only Texans really knows this? and even then it's not wide spread.
 Mexico sent their army.
 They sent their army for relief efforts. Didn't call ahead, they drove all the way to
 San Antonio with doctors and food and all sorts of supplies.
 When people actually got a call from them saying "Hey, we're sending people
 up."
 The people who answered said "What? We can't."
 "Too late, already there."
 This was while the government was turning down help.
 So yeah, other countries send relief.
 Forest fires up in Washington last year? Firefighters from Australia came up to
 assist.
 Like.. we don't hear about this shit. At all.
 mehofkirkwall
 I can second the above with the fires.
 Most the time, when people say "oh FEMA or something sent people right?" re:
 fires, its actually people from other countries showing up and kinda ignoring the
 government telling them to fuck off and staying on behalf of local departments
 because we REALLY need them.
 If there's a huge ass disaster, and the government is sitting there with a thumb
 up it's ass, help is offered and most the time- shit, it gets there!
 But then the feds do something really fucking dirty.
 They insist they were the help, if it's talked about at all.
 They insist those people putting out fires were federal people, because to most
 people a fireman's a fireman. The people handing out water and food, a relief
 worker is a relief worker. So on and so forth.
 We had people come up when the fires were so bad a while ago- not the
 Australians, but i think there was like a German group of like 3 guys that flew
 themselves over? They came out of sheer "this is horrible and we're helping"
 and my dad [local fire chief] had them working with our guys and the feds lost
 no time telling every news outlet that it was THEIR people doing all the fire
 knockdowns and structure work when these guys were running into buildings
 and grabbing people, pets, and people's important documents because they
 knew papers were a pain in the ass to replace.
 What you gotta understand is that our government is very intent on selling us
 and the rest of the world [as much as possible] the idea of a powerful and self
 reliant country. All our reporting on disasters, starts with the scaremongering
 and then moves to "but our people can handle it because we're the best at
 handling things" and then they move on before the idea it's out of control
 comes to mind. The average person outside of the disaster has no idea, if they
 have never been around such an event or met someone who regularly deals
 with these things, they will kinda probably nod along with that. Because we
 have no real scope on the scale and impact- by design. Our media intake is
 very controlled to slant everything to the "eh, we can handle it and everyone
 else out there- they need our help because they're not so good at handling
 disasters like we are."
 People who know better, reading international news, interacting with
 international social groups, looking outside their sphere of community- we
 know better but that kinda slant is really hard to break from because of that grip
 American media has on information.
 So, taking that knowledge, we further have restricted reporting on certain
 disasters because they're considered unimportant.
 Hurricanes are considered important, earthquakes are only considered
 important if it wrecks something the government cares about or somewhere a
 couple million people live that they'll upset the national money flow/they can
 throw money at someone to make the news care, floods are only important if
 it's in a similar manner to earthquakes but since they occur annually they're
 rarely reported on nationally, mudslides that kill people or leave hundreds
 homeless aren't important to the government even through they happen
 constantly, wildfires that consume most of the nation/continent each year
 generally are unimportant until they consume a town or threaten a government
 interest/money flow location.
 Terrorist attacks are always important because people will talk about them.
 So, when we do get help for any of the above, it's possible that most people
 may have no idea about what's happened, let alone that help's been sent. Or if
 people know something happened, the details are vague- the news don't care
 to give the nitty gritty. You'll know something happened and people are
 suffering and "gee, isn't it good you're not them" and then now the weather.
 So, yeah, basically no one really knows we get help.
 petitepenquin
 International response to Hurricane Katrina:
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_response_to_Hurricane_Katrina
 We got HELLA help, but nobody really talks about it
 evilelitest2
 American Media really fails regularly
 iammyfather
 Hurricane Sandy, Quebec sends power line crews down to assist in restoring
 power. California gets rid of water bombers due to budget cuts, Canada sends
 theirs down to help fight wild fires. Amazing what living on the border and
 having outside TV News does to your information flow.
 cyanwrites
 After Katrina, Denmark offered to donate water purification units so people
 wouldn't get sick from drinking contaminated water, but the offer was declined.
 A private Danish company built a mobile satellite phone booth and drove it
 around the poor neighbourhoods in Mississippi and Louisiana so people could
 call their families and insurance companies for free (apparently there was a
 deadline for reporting damages but people couldn't call in because their mobile
 phones were dead and landlines were down).
 markingatlightspeed
 American propaganda is not a thing of the past, nor is it a new thing. It has
 been around forever, telling stories of exceptionalism and self-reliance while
 our government tries its hardest to refuse the help of others and offer its own to
 them, to try and force other nations onto their back foot and remain
 aggressively benevolent in international matters, so that it can lord that shit over
 them in negotiations and the media in general.
 I guarantee you America would have a less jingoistic, less xenophobic
 populace overall if this sort of information were actually reported to us. If we
 weren't always fed the lie of helping the world without any gratitude or help in
 return. If the media didn't present us as world police and instead as a part of the
 community, as other countries try hard to include us as, then maybe Americans
 would actually act like they're part of a fucking community.
 But global citizens are hard to monger fear and distrust and xenophobia and
 nationalism with. They're hard to control with propaganda and hate. They're
 hard to keep ignorant and docile and saying "this is fine" while the empire
 burns.
 A lot of Americans wonder why our country is seen as a worldwide bully. Shit
 like that, my friends. Shit like that Its hubris is seemingly limitless.
 velocicrafter
 COMMENTARY
stay mfing woke

stay mfing woke

prejudice: Discrimination Being transgender is not a mental disorder. It cannot be "cured" with treatment, Transgender people do experience a persistent disconnect between their assigned sex and their internal sense of who they are, according to the HRC. Medical professionals refer to this disconnect as gender dysphoria because it can cause pain and distress in the lives of transgender people. The American Psychiatric Association in 2012 announced that a new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) would replace the term "gender identity disorder" with the more neutral term "gender dysphoria." Research has shown that transgender people are at high risk of experiencing prejudice and mental-health problems. The 2014 National Transgender Discrimination Survey found that 60 percent of health care providers refuse treatment to transgender people. Additionally, the research found that 64 to 65 percent of the transgender people surveyed suffered physical or sexual violence at work, and 63 to 78 percent suffered physical or sexual violence at school. Transgender people often face discrimination even when using the bathroom. In a 2016 poll of Americans by CBS and The New York Times, 46 percent of respondents said those who are transgender should use the bathrooms assigned to their birth genders, while 41 percent said such individuals should be able use the bathroom that matches their identities. In May 2016, the U.S. Education and Justice departments stepped in to advise school districts to permit transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms that matched the students' gender identities. In response, several states joined in a lawsuit, stating that the federal government had overreached its authority. Because of discrimination and other factors, the suicide rate among transgender people is high. The Suicide Prevention Resource Center reports that more than 83 percent of transgender people had thought about suicide and 54 percent had attempted it. (The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255.) This article was actually posted by LiveScience and says you need to have a disconnect (gender dysphoria) to be trans. How do I delete someone else's article? FFS
prejudice: Discrimination
 Being transgender is not a mental disorder. It cannot be "cured" with treatment,
 Transgender people do experience a persistent disconnect between their
 assigned sex and their internal sense of who they are, according to the HRC.
 Medical professionals refer to this disconnect as gender dysphoria because it
 can cause pain and distress in the lives of transgender people.
 The American Psychiatric Association in 2012 announced that a new version of
 the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) would replace
 the term "gender identity disorder" with the more neutral term "gender
 dysphoria."
 Research has shown that transgender people are at high risk of experiencing
 prejudice and mental-health problems. The 2014 National Transgender
 Discrimination Survey found that 60 percent of health care providers refuse
 treatment to transgender people. Additionally, the research found that 64 to 65
 percent of the transgender people surveyed suffered physical or sexual violence
 at work, and 63 to 78 percent suffered physical or sexual violence at school.
 Transgender people often face discrimination even when using the bathroom. In
 a 2016 poll of Americans by CBS and The New York Times, 46 percent of
 respondents said those who are transgender should use the bathrooms
 assigned to their birth genders, while 41 percent said such individuals should be
 able use the bathroom that matches their identities. In May 2016, the U.S.
 Education and Justice departments stepped in to advise school districts to
 permit transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms that matched
 the students' gender identities. In response, several states joined in a lawsuit,
 stating that the federal government had overreached its authority.
 Because of discrimination and other factors, the suicide rate among transgender
 people is high. The Suicide Prevention Resource Center reports that more than
 83 percent of transgender people had thought about suicide and 54 percent had
 attempted it. (The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255.)
This article was actually posted by LiveScience and says you need to have a disconnect (gender dysphoria) to be trans. How do I delete someone else's article? FFS

This article was actually posted by LiveScience and says you need to have a disconnect (gender dysphoria) to be trans. How do I delete so...