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Children, Head, and Mood: nothingbutamother: dynastylnoire: ladycedar: There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives. Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly. After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down. Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them. art therapy is important. You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them. This is seriously so wonderful. It’s easy to write certain kids off as “bad kids” but it’s important to remember that they’re kids. That kid who yells and cusses and throws chairs has absolute turmoil inside their little mind and has no idea how to deal with it. Instead of contributing to the madness, find a way to redirect the frustration. Teach them how to deal with stress in a healthy way. Children. Have. To. Be. Taught.
Children, Head, and Mood: nothingbutamother:
dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.
Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.
After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.
Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them.


This is seriously so wonderful. It’s easy to write certain kids off as “bad kids” but it’s important to remember that they’re kids. That kid who yells and cusses and throws chairs has absolute turmoil inside their little mind and has no idea how to deal with it. Instead of contributing to the madness, find a way to redirect the frustration. Teach them how to deal with stress in a healthy way. Children. Have. To. Be. Taught.

nothingbutamother: dynastylnoire: ladycedar: There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel...

Children, College, and Confidence: Maya's Homework 5:32 PM (9 minutes ago) Bunmi Laditan to Hello Maya's teachers, Maya will be drastically reducing the amount of homework she does this year. She's been very stressed and is starting to have physical symptoms such as chest pain and waking up at 4AM worrying about her school workload. She's not behind academically and very much enjoys school. We've consulted with a tutor and a therapist suggested we lighten her workload. Doing 2-3 hours of homework after getting home at 4:30 is leaving little time for her to just be a child and enjoy family time and we'd like to avoid her sinking into a depression over this. Thank you for understanding. warmly, Bunmi vaporwavevocap: ryttu3k: darkwizardjamesmason: dienaziscum: fishcustardandclintbarton: huffingtonpost: Mom declares her daughter is done with homework in viral email. Blogger Bunmi Laditan sent her 10-year-old’s school a clear message. “Hello Maya’s teachers, Maya will be drastically reducing the amount of homework she does this year. She’s been very stressed and is starting to have physical symptoms such as chest pain and waking up at 4 a.m. worrying about her school workload. She’s not behind academically and very much enjoys school. We consulted with a tutor and a therapist suggested we lighten her workload. Doing 2-3 hours of homework after getting home at 4:30 is leaving little time for her to just be a child and enjoy family time and we’d like to avoid her sinking into a depression over this.” A++++ parenting 💜 I’ve talked with a whole cadre of child therapists and psychiatrists about this very issue. There is little conclusive evidence that homework significantly improves elementary school children’s grades, understanding of subjects, or facility with various operations, processes, etc. However, plenty of evidence suggests that ever-increasing amounts of homework for young children lead to stress, anxiety, emotional fatigue, resistance toward academics in general, lack of leisure time to build social/interpersonal skills, and poorer family relations.  (My kids were doing about 3 hours a week IN KINDERGARTEN, at age 5 – so that’s ½ hour every night, after a 6.5 hour school day, or else saving it up for long slogs over the weekend, even more disruptive. And that wasn’t including reading practice!) We have stopped doing homework altogether with my 7 year old as a result of severe anxiety/depression and a learning disability. She had gotten to a place where she had so little self confidence and truly believed that she was stupid and worthless, not just because of homework of course – but every time we tried to sit down to do homework with her, it’d end in tears with her really vehemently berating herself, and no amount of encouragement could ameliorate the damage done. Now, granted, she’s got other things going on besides just an overload of school work. But in NO WAY did the homework help her, either academically or emotionally.  No little kid should have to spend an hour or more each night getting through homework. Now, my deal with Siena is that if she wants to give her homework a shot, I will absolutely help her if she wishes for help, but I no longer force her to complete all of it or to work on it for some set length of time before finally throwing in the towel.  Guess what? With the pressure taken off, she’s actually doing MORE independent work now, purely out of the desire to learn and practice, than she ever was before we’d decided with her therapy team and school that homework was just not a thing this kid could handle. Luckily for my older daughter my school’s 3rd-grade team decided to hand out homework only 3x/week, and the sheets take no more than 15-20 minutes to complete. That is totally reasonable for 8-9 year olds!  Anyway tl;dr just because the school system may require it sure as shit doesn’t mean parents can’t, or shouldn’t, fight it. Do what’s right for your kid, and above all, let them be kids.  I eventually stopped doing homework because I was overwhelmed by it. There was an article just the other day in the local paper about a primary school that’s abolishing homework! You can read it here (autoplay video, gives you a few seconds to stop it). Homework is intrusive in a young child’s life. It makes sense for adults who will likely have to bring work home with them so in college it’s good training. But for young kids. No. Seriously I’m 100% on board with this. There are high school students expected to do three or four hours and beyond worth of homework every day. It’s fucking ridiculous. And I work in elementary school where we literally have little kids develop anxiety disorder and have panic attacks over homework and testing. This shit is not normal.
Children, College, and Confidence: Maya's Homework
 5:32 PM (9 minutes ago)
 Bunmi Laditan
 to
 Hello Maya's teachers,
 Maya will be drastically reducing the amount of homework she does this year. She's been very stressed and is starting to have
 physical symptoms such as chest pain and waking up at 4AM worrying about her school workload.
 She's not behind academically and very much enjoys school. We've consulted with a tutor and a therapist suggested we lighten
 her workload. Doing 2-3 hours of homework after getting home at 4:30 is leaving little time for her to just be a child and enjoy
 family time and we'd like to avoid her sinking into a depression over this.
 Thank you for understanding.
 warmly, Bunmi
vaporwavevocap:

ryttu3k:
darkwizardjamesmason:

dienaziscum:

fishcustardandclintbarton:

huffingtonpost:


Mom declares her daughter is done with homework in viral email.
Blogger Bunmi Laditan sent her 10-year-old’s school a clear message.
“Hello Maya’s teachers,
Maya will be drastically reducing the amount of homework she does this year. She’s been very stressed and is starting to have physical symptoms such as chest pain and waking up at 4 a.m. worrying about her school workload. 
She’s not behind academically and very much enjoys school. We consulted with a tutor and a therapist suggested we lighten her workload. Doing 2-3 hours of homework after getting home at 4:30 is leaving little time for her to just be a child and enjoy family time and we’d like to avoid her sinking into a depression over this.”


A++++ parenting 💜

I’ve talked with a whole cadre of child therapists and psychiatrists about this very issue. There is little conclusive evidence that homework significantly improves elementary school children’s grades, understanding of subjects, or facility with various operations, processes, etc. However, plenty of evidence suggests that ever-increasing amounts of homework for young children lead to stress, anxiety, emotional fatigue, resistance toward academics in general, lack of leisure time to build social/interpersonal skills, and poorer family relations.  (My kids were doing about 3 hours a week IN KINDERGARTEN, at age 5 – so that’s ½ hour every night, after a 6.5 hour school day, or else saving it up for long slogs over the weekend, even more disruptive. And that wasn’t including reading practice!) 


We have stopped doing homework altogether with my 7 year old as a result of severe anxiety/depression and a learning disability. She had gotten to a place where she had so little self confidence and truly believed that she was stupid and worthless, not just because of homework of course – but every time we tried to sit down to do homework with her, it’d end in tears with her really vehemently berating herself, and no amount of encouragement could ameliorate the damage done. Now, granted, she’s got other things going on besides just an overload of school work. But in NO WAY did the homework help her, either academically or emotionally. 
No little kid should have to spend an hour or more each night getting through homework. Now, my deal with Siena is that if she wants to give her homework a shot, I will absolutely help her if she wishes for help, but I no longer force her to complete all of it or to work on it for some set length of time before finally throwing in the towel. 
Guess what? With the pressure taken off, she’s actually doing MORE independent work now, purely out of the desire to learn and practice, than she ever was before we’d decided with her therapy team and school that homework was just not a thing this kid could handle.
Luckily for my older daughter my school’s 3rd-grade team decided to hand out homework only 3x/week, and the sheets take no more than 15-20 minutes to complete. That is totally reasonable for 8-9 year olds! 
Anyway tl;dr just because the school system may require it sure as shit doesn’t mean parents can’t, or shouldn’t, fight it. Do what’s right for your kid, and above all, let them be kids. 

I eventually stopped doing homework because I was overwhelmed by it.

There was an article just the other day in the local paper about a primary school that’s abolishing homework! You can read it here (autoplay video, gives you a few seconds to stop it).


Homework is intrusive in a young child’s life. It makes sense for adults who will likely have to bring work home with them so in college it’s good training. But for young kids. No.

Seriously I’m 100% on board with this. There are high school students expected to do three or four hours and beyond worth of homework every day. It’s fucking ridiculous. And I work in elementary school where we literally have little kids develop anxiety disorder and have panic attacks over homework and testing. This shit is not normal.

vaporwavevocap: ryttu3k: darkwizardjamesmason: dienaziscum: fishcustardandclintbarton: huffingtonpost: Mom declares her daughter is do...

80s, Cute, and Fashion: In the 1970s, Japanese teenage girls developed such excessively cute handwriting that it was banned in schools due to illegibility. なおちゃん ·かようびに ks) (GK34リ Ultrafacts,.tumblr.com deadcatwithaflamethrower: star-anise: imfemalewarrior: imthegingerninja: nerdgul: gayonthemoon1239: rifa: actualbloggerwangyao: alvaroandtheworld: ultrafacts: Source  THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too. And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards. So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks 3 !!!!! NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT! This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!” All the Japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any Japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men) Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.    so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase Kawaii is so goth Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace I did not know this but I love this form of feminism!  -FemaleWarrior, She/They  Which is why you get bands like BABYMETAL, which toured with Judas Priest for a while, looking like this: Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace
80s, Cute, and Fashion: In the 1970s, Japanese teenage girls
 developed such excessively cute
 handwriting that it was banned in
 schools due to illegibility.
 なおちゃん
 ·かようびに
 ks) (GK34リ
 Ultrafacts,.tumblr.com
deadcatwithaflamethrower:
star-anise:

imfemalewarrior:

imthegingerninja:

nerdgul:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source 

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks 3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the Japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any Japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Kawaii is so goth 


Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace 

I did not know this but I love this form of feminism! 
-FemaleWarrior, She/They 

Which is why you get bands like BABYMETAL, which toured with Judas Priest for a while, looking like this:


Metal heads Stan for our sisters in lace

deadcatwithaflamethrower: star-anise: imfemalewarrior: imthegingerninja: nerdgul: gayonthemoon1239: rifa: actualbloggerwangyao: alvar...