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Memes, Target, and Work: Complete Development ofthe LATS @strengthguide Latissimus Dorsi SG The meaty lats primary actions are vertical adduction (like a pull up), horizontal abduction (like a barbell row), and shoulder extension (like a pull over or a pull down where the elbows are in front of the body Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ On vertical pulling exercises, like the lat pull down; the lats aren’t affected by grip width to any meaningful degree. However, it seems that regardless of the grip width, the pronated grip (overhand) comes out on top for activating the lats [1], compared to a supinated grip (underhand) _ As far as behind the neck or in front of the neck, 1 study showed that in front of the neck was superior at activating the lats [2]. So you probably aren’t missing out on anything if you aren’t doing any behind the neck pull downs. _ If you want to debate over wide grip, medium, or narrow grip; it seems that the wide and medium grips are better at activating the lats during the eccentric portion of the lift only. While no differences in lat activation in any grip during the concentric phase. However, my personal hunch is to go with a medium grip, as the same study did show that the medium grip was slightly better at recruiting the biceps [3]. Again, the difference in grip widths is minor. _ It’s important to also train the lats via its other functions as well, so far we’ve been primarily discussing lat activation in vertical adduction. But it would be wise to also have a lat pulldown variation where the elbows are in front of the body (like a neutral grip), or a pullover, so we train the lats via their shoulder extension role. _ 1 study also found that rowing exercises target the lats just as much as pull downs but were better at activating the traps and rhomboids [4]. This makes sense as those muscles are involved in scapular retraction, which you do a lot of during rowing exercises. _ Overall, just pull in a vertical plane and a horizontal plane. But most importantly, limit your momentum, a little bit is okay but most people let their egos take over to the point where they are using their hips, knees, and ankles to do half the work. However much momentum you use (which is hopefully minimal), should be consistent. That way when you progress in load or do more reps you know its because you actually got stronger, and not because you increased your momentum. References in the comments.
Memes, Target, and Work: Complete Development ofthe
 LATS
 @strengthguide
 Latissimus Dorsi
 SG
 The meaty lats primary actions are vertical adduction (like a
 pull up), horizontal abduction (like a barbell row), and
 shoulder extension (like a pull over or a pull down where the
 elbows are in front of the body
Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ On vertical pulling exercises, like the lat pull down; the lats aren’t affected by grip width to any meaningful degree. However, it seems that regardless of the grip width, the pronated grip (overhand) comes out on top for activating the lats [1], compared to a supinated grip (underhand) _ As far as behind the neck or in front of the neck, 1 study showed that in front of the neck was superior at activating the lats [2]. So you probably aren’t missing out on anything if you aren’t doing any behind the neck pull downs. _ If you want to debate over wide grip, medium, or narrow grip; it seems that the wide and medium grips are better at activating the lats during the eccentric portion of the lift only. While no differences in lat activation in any grip during the concentric phase. However, my personal hunch is to go with a medium grip, as the same study did show that the medium grip was slightly better at recruiting the biceps [3]. Again, the difference in grip widths is minor. _ It’s important to also train the lats via its other functions as well, so far we’ve been primarily discussing lat activation in vertical adduction. But it would be wise to also have a lat pulldown variation where the elbows are in front of the body (like a neutral grip), or a pullover, so we train the lats via their shoulder extension role. _ 1 study also found that rowing exercises target the lats just as much as pull downs but were better at activating the traps and rhomboids [4]. This makes sense as those muscles are involved in scapular retraction, which you do a lot of during rowing exercises. _ Overall, just pull in a vertical plane and a horizontal plane. But most importantly, limit your momentum, a little bit is okay but most people let their egos take over to the point where they are using their hips, knees, and ankles to do half the work. However much momentum you use (which is hopefully minimal), should be consistent. That way when you progress in load or do more reps you know its because you actually got stronger, and not because you increased your momentum. References in the comments.

Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ On vertical pulling exercises, like the lat pull down; the lats aren’t affected by grip wid...