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Blessed, Club, and Life: Medusa was defendin herself rs geekremix: xenaamazon: awkward-dark-mori-girl: takealookatyourlife: takealookatyourlife: Athena blessed her with the ability to protect herself and men beheaded her for it. That’s actually a really intetesting intpretation of it I hadn’t thought of. Most people seem to think Athena turned Medusa into a gorgon as punishment for defiling her temple, but thinking that she did so to protect her from being abused again is interesting and I like it! Athena’s hands were tied. Yes, she was a powerful Goddess, but she was very much a woman in a “boys club”, and the true offending party (don’t think for a moment that Athena blamed Medusa for being raped in the temple, Athena knows better) held all the cards. There was nothing that Athena could do to punish the true criminal, and she was expected to punish Medusa by everyone else. What’s a Goddess to do when she cannot punish those who need to be punished and is expected to punish not only the truly innocent party, but her most beloved follower? Use that incredible brain power she had to protect Medusa at all costs, and of course the men would see it as punishment, to be have her beauty stripped from her and sent to live in the shadows. Medusa should have been KILLED for supposedly defiling the temple, whether she truly did or not, but she was given the gift of life, and the ability to protect herself and her daughters (who she bore thanks to Poseidon). This is why Medusa’s image was used to signify woman’s shelters and safe houses. Medusa means “guardian; protectress”, and she was. holy shit.
Blessed, Club, and Life: Medusa
 was
 defendin
 herself
 rs
geekremix:
xenaamazon:

awkward-dark-mori-girl:

takealookatyourlife:

takealookatyourlife:
Athena blessed her with the ability to protect herself and men beheaded her for it.

That’s actually a really intetesting intpretation of it I hadn’t thought of. Most people seem to think Athena turned Medusa into a gorgon as punishment for defiling her temple, but thinking that she did so to protect her from being abused again is interesting and I like it!


Athena’s hands were tied. Yes, she was a powerful Goddess, but she was very much a woman in a “boys club”, and the true offending party (don’t think for a moment that Athena blamed Medusa for being raped in the temple, Athena knows better) held all the cards. There was nothing that Athena could do to punish the true criminal, and she was expected to punish Medusa by everyone else. What’s a Goddess to do when she cannot punish those who need to be punished and is expected to punish not only the truly innocent party, but her most beloved follower? Use that incredible brain power she had to protect Medusa at all costs, and of course the men would see it as punishment, to be have her beauty stripped from her and sent to live in the shadows. Medusa should have been KILLED for supposedly defiling the temple, whether she truly did or not, but she was given the gift of life, and the ability to protect herself and her daughters (who she bore thanks to Poseidon). This is why Medusa’s image was used to signify woman’s shelters and safe houses.
Medusa means “guardian; protectress”, and she was.

holy shit.

geekremix: xenaamazon: awkward-dark-mori-girl: takealookatyourlife: takealookatyourlife: Athena blessed her with the ability to protect h...

Being Alone, Butt, and Community: gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah she ra progressive of power live podcast tweets thread: noelle stevenson interview 11:17 AM 22 Feb 2019 C)10 e) 4 Retweets 15 Likes 15 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 54m dnd classes, according to noelle - adora: fighter glimmer sorcerer bow: bard and ranger she ra: paladin catra: "a rogue, obviously" 6 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 46m the show stands on its own even though it's a legacy production. noelle didn't want to be held back by fear of changing too much. she was prepared for negative backlash, but hopes that if legacy fans give the new show a try, they'll recognize the core spirit of the show 7 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 44m noelle sometimes gets e-mails from young kids who love her work (because they don't have twitter), as well as their parents, and it's super important and cute and good 7 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 41m "it's important to have a lightness... and freedom to [what we make] so we're not just dumping sadness and suffering on our audiences." 6 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 38m noelle doesn't know what discord or tik tok are 8 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 31m "[netossa and spinerella] are a couple... slightly older. they have their own life outside what these teenagers are doing, and the teenagers don't understand it because they're doing their own thing. they have a lovely house somewhere... but the teens are not as perceptive." 9 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 29m "[netossa and spinerella] have a stability to them [while] our younger characters are often so messy and melodramatic and their feelings run wild, but these two.. their presence is reliable." 8 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 27m in the original netossa doesn't have powers, she just has nets that she throws on people gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 24m "[adoral is a little bit of a glutton for punishment in some ways... that's HER. she's kinda ready to get her butt kicked, yknow? she's like, i'm the only one who's gonna get hurt right now. 8 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 23m "adora had her world view challenged in 1.11 in a way that she never had. the idea that adora always thought she was doing the right thing for catra, and realizing that catra actually had resentment, i think that rattled her hard, to her core 5 9 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 21m "and so, adora's emotional state and mental-well being is tied to how powerful she is as she-ra. as soon as she starts letting her insecurities take over, she ra gets less powerful, especially when she's alone 8 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 20m "she is so distracted that she's kinda taken out by this fight with catra." 8 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 20m "[adora's] looking to be punished in some way." 7 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 18m "adora's fatal flaw [is] taking agency... to try to protect [catra specifically, but also everyone]. she is self-sacrifical!... but it shows a lack of faith." gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 18m "[adora] really wants to take every single bullet." 5 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 17m the writers planned the 'stronger together idea for cultural relevancy 2 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 16m "production began in earnest in 2016. this was not an accident. it's an escapist fantasy... .but it still comes out... we're putting our own feelings into almost every single character in so many ways. it's not an allegory... it's our feelings and struggles being expressed." 5 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 13m noelle has always had a big interest in villains, and related to them very much. BUT she realized, making this show "that was the fantasy, the idea of the complicated but sympathetic" isn't close to "real world villains who lack empathy when they hurt people and take away rights" 5 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 12m "even hordak is a fantasy, like, what if these were the villains that we faced, these complicated shades-of-grey... that's the escapist version. the pain of a real-world person is... how could you THINK that? how could you DO that? and there's not really an answer 7 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 9m "we are gonna have massive status quo shifts, like... you guys have no idea" 2 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 9m "we are NOWHERE near done" gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 6m "i am a gay woman, engaged to a woman. i was really passionate about... in the show's DNA, [providing a home to the lgbt+ community." gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 6m "the rainbow iconography is no accident. 2 6 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 4m "it's even more than the ships, the pairings... here is a WORLD, where queer themes are so interwoven into the fabric of the show that they exist on every level, even if they're not made explicit. obviously there are still barriers, but these themes... can't be removed." 7 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 3m when noelle pitched the rainbow thing at the end of the battle, an exec was like, "what's the point?" and noelle said, deadpan, "it's the gay agenda" 6 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 3m "this isn't a secret.. or something i'm ashamed of. it's a big part of what the show is. it's bigger than ships. it's about showing a world where this is just a part of normal life." 5 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 1m "there are so many things, even in the next episode drop, that are gonna change the whole stakes of the show." hey-adora:noelle stevenson did an awesome interview with the progressive of power podcast! i took notes on twitter, thought tumblr would like them too 3
Being Alone, Butt, and Community: gee i wonder if sam likes catra
 @heyadorah
 she ra progressive of power live podcast
 tweets thread: noelle stevenson interview
 11:17 AM 22 Feb 2019
 C)10
 e)
 4 Retweets 15 Likes
 15
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 54m
 dnd classes, according to noelle -
 adora: fighter
 glimmer sorcerer
 bow: bard and ranger
 she ra: paladin
 catra: "a rogue, obviously"
 6
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 46m
 the show stands on its own even though it's a legacy production. noelle didn't
 want to be held back by fear of changing too much. she was prepared for
 negative backlash, but hopes that if legacy fans give the new show a try, they'll
 recognize the core spirit of the show
 7
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 44m
 noelle sometimes gets e-mails from young kids who love her work (because they
 don't have twitter), as well as their parents, and it's super important and cute and
 good
 7

 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 41m
 "it's important to have a lightness... and freedom to [what we make] so we're not
 just dumping sadness and suffering on our audiences."
 6
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 38m
 noelle doesn't know what discord or tik tok are
 8
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 31m
 "[netossa and spinerella] are a couple... slightly older. they have their own life
 outside what these teenagers are doing, and the teenagers don't understand it
 because they're doing their own thing. they have a lovely house somewhere... but
 the teens are not as perceptive."
 9
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 29m
 "[netossa and spinerella] have a stability to them [while] our younger characters
 are often so messy and melodramatic and their feelings run wild, but these two..
 their presence is reliable."
 8
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 27m
 in the original netossa doesn't have powers, she just has nets that she throws on
 people
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 24m
 "[adoral is a little bit of a glutton for punishment in some ways... that's HER. she's
 kinda ready to get her butt kicked, yknow? she's like, i'm the only one who's
 gonna get hurt right now.
 8

 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 23m
 "adora had her world view challenged in 1.11 in a way that she never had. the
 idea that adora always thought she was doing the right thing for catra, and
 realizing that catra actually had resentment, i think that rattled her hard, to her
 core
 5
 9
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 21m
 "and so, adora's emotional state and mental-well being is tied to how powerful
 she is as she-ra. as soon as she starts letting her insecurities take over, she ra gets
 less powerful, especially when she's alone
 8
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 20m
 "she is so distracted that she's kinda taken out by this fight with catra."
 8
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 20m
 "[adora's] looking to be punished in some way."
 7
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 18m
 "adora's fatal flaw [is] taking agency... to try to protect [catra specifically, but also
 everyone]. she is self-sacrifical!... but it shows a lack of faith."
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 18m
 "[adora] really wants to take every single bullet."
 5
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 17m
 the writers planned the 'stronger together idea for cultural relevancy
 2

 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 16m
 "production began in earnest in 2016. this was not an accident. it's an escapist
 fantasy... .but it still comes out... we're putting our own feelings into almost every
 single character in so many ways. it's not an allegory... it's our feelings and
 struggles being expressed."
 5
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 13m
 noelle has always had a big interest in villains, and related to them very much.
 BUT she realized, making this show "that was the fantasy, the idea of the
 complicated but sympathetic" isn't close to "real world villains who lack empathy
 when they hurt people and take away rights"
 5
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 12m
 "even hordak is a fantasy, like, what if these were the villains that we faced, these
 complicated shades-of-grey... that's the escapist version. the pain of a real-world
 person is... how could you THINK that? how could you DO that? and there's not
 really an answer
 7
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 9m
 "we are gonna have massive status quo shifts, like... you guys have no idea"
 2
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 9m
 "we are NOWHERE near done"
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 6m
 "i am a gay woman, engaged to a woman. i was really passionate about... in the
 show's DNA, [providing a home to the lgbt+ community."

 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 6m
 "the rainbow iconography is no accident.
 2
 6
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 4m
 "it's even more than the ships, the pairings... here is a WORLD, where queer
 themes are so interwoven into the fabric of the show that they exist on every
 level, even if they're not made explicit. obviously there are still barriers, but these
 themes... can't be removed."
 7
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 3m
 when noelle pitched the rainbow thing at the end of the battle, an exec was like,
 "what's the point?" and noelle said, deadpan, "it's the gay agenda"
 6
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 3m
 "this isn't a secret.. or something i'm ashamed of. it's a big part of what the show
 is. it's bigger than ships. it's about showing a world where this is just a part of
 normal life."
 5
 gee i wonder if sam likes catra @heyadorah 1m
 "there are so many things, even in the next episode drop, that are gonna change
 the whole stakes of the show."
hey-adora:noelle stevenson did an awesome interview with the progressive of power podcast! i took notes on twitter, thought tumblr would like them too 3

hey-adora:noelle stevenson did an awesome interview with the progressive of power podcast! i took notes on twitter, thought tumblr would lik...

Tumblr, Blog, and Austrian: inividia: Punished Levity (detail) Hans Zatzka (Austrian, 1859-1945)
Tumblr, Blog, and Austrian: inividia:

Punished Levity (detail) Hans Zatzka (Austrian, 1859-1945)

inividia: Punished Levity (detail) Hans Zatzka (Austrian, 1859-1945)

Anaconda, Crime, and Fail: 7 Ways Police Will Break the Law, Threaten, or Lie to You to Get What they Want Cops routinely break the law. Here's how. By Larken Rose / The Free Thought ProjectOctober 19, 2015 libertarirynn: gvldngrl: wolfoverdose: rikodeine: seemeflow: Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced to testify against himself, and because of the Fourth Amendment, no one’s records or belongings may legally be searched or seized without just cause. However, American police are trained to use methods of deception, intimidation and manipulation to circumvent these restrictions. In other words, cops routinely break the law—in letter and in spirit—in the name of enforcing the law. Several examples of this are widely known, if not widely understood. 1) “Do you know why I stopped you?”Cops ask this, not because they want to have a friendly chat, but because they want you to incriminate yourself. They are hoping you will “voluntarily” confess to having broken the law, whether it was something they had already noticed or not. You may think you are apologizing, or explaining, or even making excuses, but from the cop’s perspective, you are confessing. He is not there to serve you; he is there fishing for an excuse to fine or arrest you. In asking you the familiar question, he is essentially asking you what crime you just committed. And he will do this without giving you any “Miranda” warning, in an effort to trick you into testifying against yourself. 2) “Do you have something to hide?”Police often talk as if you need a good reason for not answering whatever questions they ask, or for not consenting to a warrantless search of your person, your car, or even your home. The ridiculous implication is that if you haven’t committed a crime, you should be happy to be subjected to random interrogations and searches. This turns the concept of due process on its head, as the cop tries to put the burden on you to prove your innocence, while implying that your failure to “cooperate” with random harassment must be evidence of guilt. 3) “Cooperating will make things easier on you.”The logical converse of this statement implies that refusing to answer questions and refusing to consent to a search will make things more difficult for you. In other words, you will be punished if you exercise your rights. Of course, if they coerce you into giving them a reason to fine or arrest you, they will claim that you “voluntarily” answered questions and “consented” to a search, and will pretend there was no veiled threat of what they might do to you if you did not willingly “cooperate.”(Such tactics are also used by prosecutors and judges via the procedure of “plea-bargaining,” whereby someone accused of a crime is essentially told that if he confesses guilt—thus relieving the government of having to present evidence or prove anything—then his suffering will be reduced. In fact, “plea bargaining” is illegal in many countries precisely because it basically constitutes coerced confessions.) 4) “We’ll just get a warrant.”Cops may try to persuade you to “consent” to a search by claiming that they could easily just go get a warrant if you don’t consent. This is just another ploy to intimidate people into surrendering their rights, with the implication again being that whoever inconveniences the police by requiring them to go through the process of getting a warrant will receive worse treatment than one who “cooperates.” But by definition, one who is threatened or intimidated into “consenting” has not truly consented to anything. 5.) We have someone who will testify against youPolice “informants” are often individuals whose own legal troubles have put them in a position where they can be used by the police to circumvent and undermine the constitutional rights of others. For example, once the police have something to hold over one individual, they can then bully that individual into giving false, anonymous testimony which can be used to obtain search warrants to use against others. Even if the informant gets caught lying, the police can say they didn’t know, making this tactic cowardly and illegal, but also very effective at getting around constitutional restrictions. 6) “We can hold you for 72 hours without charging you.”Based only on claimed suspicion, even without enough evidence or other probable cause to charge you with a crime, the police can kidnap you—or threaten to kidnap you—and use that to persuade you to confess to some relatively minor offense. Using this tactic, which borders on being torture, police can obtain confessions they know to be false, from people whose only concern, then and there, is to be released. 7) “I’m going to search you for my own safety.”Using so-called “Terry frisks” (named after the Supreme Court case of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1), police can carry out certain limited searches, without any warrant or probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed, under the guise of checking for weapons. By simply asserting that someone might have a weapon, police can disregard and circumvent the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches. U.S. courts have gone back and forth in deciding how often, and in what circumstances, tactics like those mentioned above are acceptable. And of course, police continually go far beyond anything the courts have declared to be “legal” anyway. But aside from nitpicking legal technicalities, both coerced confessions and unreasonable searches are still unconstitutional, and therefore “illegal,” regardless of the rationale or excuses used to try to justify them. Yet, all too often, cops show that to them, the Fourth and Fifth Amendments—and any other restrictions on their power—are simply technical inconveniences for them to try to get around. In other words, they will break the law whenever they can get away with it if it serves their own agenda and power, and they will ironically insist that they need to do that in order to catch “law-breakers” (the kind who don’t wear badges). Of course, if the above tactics fail, police can simply bully people into confessing—falsely or truthfully—and/or carry out unconstitutional searches, knowing that the likelihood of cops having to face any punishment for doing so is extremely low. Usually all that happens, even when a search was unquestionably and obviously illegal, or when a confession was clearly coerced, is that any evidence obtained from the illegal search or forced confession is excluded from being allowed at trial. Of course, if there is no trial—either because the person plea-bargains or because there was no evidence and no crime—the “exclusionary rule” creates no deterrent at all. The police can, and do, routinely break the law and violate individual rights, knowing that there will be no adverse repercussions for them having done so. Likewise, the police can lie under oath, plant evidence, falsely charge people with “resisting arrest” or “assaulting an officer,” and commit other blatantly illegal acts, knowing full well that their fellow gang members—officers, prosecutors and judges—will almost never hold them accountable for their crimes. Even much of the general public still presumes innocence when it comes to cops accused of wrong-doing, while presuming guilt when the cops accuse someone else of wrong-doing. But this is gradually changing, as the amount of video evidence showing the true nature of the “Street Gang in Blue” becomes too much even for many police-apologists to ignore. http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want One of the biggest realizations with dealing with cops for me was the fact that they CAN lie, they are 100% legally entitled to lie, and they WILL whether you’re a victim of crime, accused of committing a crime or anything else Everyone needs to reblog this, it could save a life. Important Seriously if you ever find yourself in custody don’t say shit until you’ve got some counsel with you. No cop is your friend in that situation.
Anaconda, Crime, and Fail: 7 Ways Police Will Break the
 Law, Threaten, or Lie to You to
 Get What they Want
 Cops routinely break the law. Here's how.
 By Larken Rose / The Free Thought ProjectOctober 19, 2015
libertarirynn:

gvldngrl:

wolfoverdose:

rikodeine:

seemeflow:

Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced to testify against himself, and because of the Fourth Amendment, no one’s records or belongings may legally be searched or seized without just cause. However, American police are trained to use methods of deception, intimidation and manipulation to circumvent these restrictions. In other words, cops routinely break the law—in letter and in spirit—in the name of enforcing the law. Several examples of this are widely known, if not widely understood.
1) “Do you know why I stopped you?”Cops ask this, not because they want to have a friendly chat, but because they want you to incriminate yourself. They are hoping you will “voluntarily” confess to having broken the law, whether it was something they had already noticed or not. You may think you are apologizing, or explaining, or even making excuses, but from the cop’s perspective, you are confessing. He is not there to serve you; he is there fishing for an excuse to fine or arrest you. In asking you the familiar question, he is essentially asking you what crime you just committed. And he will do this without giving you any “Miranda” warning, in an effort to trick you into testifying against yourself.
2) “Do you have something to hide?”Police often talk as if you need a good reason for not answering whatever questions they ask, or for not consenting to a warrantless search of your person, your car, or even your home. The ridiculous implication is that if you haven’t committed a crime, you should be happy to be subjected to random interrogations and searches. This turns the concept of due process on its head, as the cop tries to put the burden on you to prove your innocence, while implying that your failure to “cooperate” with random harassment must be evidence of guilt.
3) “Cooperating will make things easier on you.”The logical converse of this statement implies that refusing to answer questions and refusing to consent to a search will make things more difficult for you. In other words, you will be punished if you exercise your rights. Of course, if they coerce you into giving them a reason to fine or arrest you, they will claim that you “voluntarily” answered questions and “consented” to a search, and will pretend there was no veiled threat of what they might do to you if you did not willingly “cooperate.”(Such tactics are also used by prosecutors and judges via the procedure of “plea-bargaining,” whereby someone accused of a crime is essentially told that if he confesses guilt—thus relieving the government of having to present evidence or prove anything—then his suffering will be reduced. In fact, “plea bargaining” is illegal in many countries precisely because it basically constitutes coerced confessions.)
4) “We’ll just get a warrant.”Cops may try to persuade you to “consent” to a search by claiming that they could easily just go get a warrant if you don’t consent. This is just another ploy to intimidate people into surrendering their rights, with the implication again being that whoever inconveniences the police by requiring them to go through the process of getting a warrant will receive worse treatment than one who “cooperates.” But by definition, one who is threatened or intimidated into “consenting” has not truly consented to anything.
5.) We have someone who will testify against youPolice “informants” are often individuals whose own legal troubles have put them in a position where they can be used by the police to circumvent and undermine the constitutional rights of others. For example, once the police have something to hold over one individual, they can then bully that individual into giving false, anonymous testimony which can be used to obtain search warrants to use against others. Even if the informant gets caught lying, the police can say they didn’t know, making this tactic cowardly and illegal, but also very effective at getting around constitutional restrictions.
6) “We can hold you for 72 hours without charging you.”Based only on claimed suspicion, even without enough evidence or other probable cause to charge you with a crime, the police can kidnap you—or threaten to kidnap you—and use that to persuade you to confess to some relatively minor offense. Using this tactic, which borders on being torture, police can obtain confessions they know to be false, from people whose only concern, then and there, is to be released.
7) “I’m going to search you for my own safety.”Using so-called “Terry frisks” (named after the Supreme Court case of Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1), police can carry out certain limited searches, without any warrant or probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed, under the guise of checking for weapons. By simply asserting that someone might have a weapon, police can disregard and circumvent the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches.
U.S. courts have gone back and forth in deciding how often, and in what circumstances, tactics like those mentioned above are acceptable. And of course, police continually go far beyond anything the courts have declared to be “legal” anyway. But aside from nitpicking legal technicalities, both coerced confessions and unreasonable searches are still unconstitutional, and therefore “illegal,” regardless of the rationale or excuses used to try to justify them. Yet, all too often, cops show that to them, the Fourth and Fifth Amendments—and any other restrictions on their power—are simply technical inconveniences for them to try to get around. In other words, they will break the law whenever they can get away with it if it serves their own agenda and power, and they will ironically insist that they need to do that in order to catch “law-breakers” (the kind who don’t wear badges).
Of course, if the above tactics fail, police can simply bully people into confessing—falsely or truthfully—and/or carry out unconstitutional searches, knowing that the likelihood of cops having to face any punishment for doing so is extremely low. Usually all that happens, even when a search was unquestionably and obviously illegal, or when a confession was clearly coerced, is that any evidence obtained from the illegal search or forced confession is excluded from being allowed at trial. Of course, if there is no trial—either because the person plea-bargains or because there was no evidence and no crime—the “exclusionary rule” creates no deterrent at all. The police can, and do, routinely break the law and violate individual rights, knowing that there will be no adverse repercussions for them having done so.
Likewise, the police can lie under oath, plant evidence, falsely charge people with “resisting arrest” or “assaulting an officer,” and commit other blatantly illegal acts, knowing full well that their fellow gang members—officers, prosecutors and judges—will almost never hold them accountable for their crimes. Even much of the general public still presumes innocence when it comes to cops accused of wrong-doing, while presuming guilt when the cops accuse someone else of wrong-doing. But this is gradually changing, as the amount of video evidence showing the true nature of the “Street Gang in Blue” becomes too much even for many police-apologists to ignore.
http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/7-ways-police-will-break-law-threaten-or-lie-you-get-what-they-want

One of the biggest realizations with dealing with cops for me was the fact that they CAN lie, they are 100% legally entitled to lie, and they WILL whether you’re a victim of crime, accused of committing a crime or anything else


Everyone needs to reblog this, it could save a life.


Important 


Seriously if you ever find yourself in custody don’t say shit until you’ve got some counsel with you. No cop is your friend in that situation.

libertarirynn: gvldngrl: wolfoverdose: rikodeine: seemeflow: Because of the Fifth Amendment, no one in the U.S. may legally be forced t...

Blessed, Club, and Life: Medusa was defendin herself rs virtuous-thing: geekremix: xenaamazon: awkward-dark-mori-girl: takealookatyourlife: takealookatyourlife: Athena blessed her with the ability to protect herself and men beheaded her for it. That’s actually a really intetesting intpretation of it I hadn’t thought of. Most people seem to think Athena turned Medusa into a gorgon as punishment for defiling her temple, but thinking that she did so to protect her from being abused again is interesting and I like it! Athena’s hands were tied. Yes, she was a powerful Goddess, but she was very much a woman in a “boys club”, and the true offending party (don’t think for a moment that Athena blamed Medusa for being raped in the temple, Athena knows better) held all the cards. There was nothing that Athena could do to punish the true criminal, and she was expected to punish Medusa by everyone else. What’s a Goddess to do when she cannot punish those who need to be punished and is expected to punish not only the truly innocent party, but her most beloved follower? Use that incredible brain power she had to protect Medusa at all costs, and of course the men would see it as punishment, to be have her beauty stripped from her and sent to live in the shadows. Medusa should have been KILLED for supposedly defiling the temple, whether she truly did or not, but she was given the gift of life, and the ability to protect herself and her daughters (who she bore thanks to Poseidon). This is why Medusa’s image was used to signify woman’s shelters and safe houses. Medusa means “guardian; protectress”, and she was. holy shit. Feministic mythology is what I’m here for
Blessed, Club, and Life: Medusa
 was
 defendin
 herself
 rs
virtuous-thing:
geekremix:

xenaamazon:

awkward-dark-mori-girl:

takealookatyourlife:

takealookatyourlife:
Athena blessed her with the ability to protect herself and men beheaded her for it.

That’s actually a really intetesting intpretation of it I hadn’t thought of. Most people seem to think Athena turned Medusa into a gorgon as punishment for defiling her temple, but thinking that she did so to protect her from being abused again is interesting and I like it!


Athena’s hands were tied. Yes, she was a powerful Goddess, but she was very much a woman in a “boys club”, and the true offending party (don’t think for a moment that Athena blamed Medusa for being raped in the temple, Athena knows better) held all the cards. There was nothing that Athena could do to punish the true criminal, and she was expected to punish Medusa by everyone else. What’s a Goddess to do when she cannot punish those who need to be punished and is expected to punish not only the truly innocent party, but her most beloved follower? Use that incredible brain power she had to protect Medusa at all costs, and of course the men would see it as punishment, to be have her beauty stripped from her and sent to live in the shadows. Medusa should have been KILLED for supposedly defiling the temple, whether she truly did or not, but she was given the gift of life, and the ability to protect herself and her daughters (who she bore thanks to Poseidon). This is why Medusa’s image was used to signify woman’s shelters and safe houses.
Medusa means “guardian; protectress”, and she was.

holy shit.


Feministic mythology is what I’m here for

virtuous-thing: geekremix: xenaamazon: awkward-dark-mori-girl: takealookatyourlife: takealookatyourlife: Athena blessed her with the abi...