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Ass, Bad, and Baseball: WARM UP SETS TREAT LIGHT WEIGHT LIKE IT'S HEAVY WEIGHT KEY POINTS: PROPER EXAMPLE OF LOADING THE BAR FOR YOUR WARM UP SETS: Treat all weights like its heavy Breathing patterns do not change o Walk out does not change o Tightness does not change ·Technique does not change period ·30% for 6-8 reps ·40% for 4-6 reps ● 50% for 3-4 reps ● 60% for 2 reps ·70% for 1 rep ·80% for 1 rep SG BEGIN WORKING SETS @strengthguide Most peoples technique look completely different when warming up vs when they are doing their working sets. There may be some difference as you're comparing light weight vs heavy challenging weight nearing failure. However, the biggest change you should see is bar speed. Your technique and approach on the other hand, should remain the same. Follow @strengthguide ・・・ We need to be smart about how we go about adding weight to the barbell as well as our execution of the lift during warm ups. Especially when it comes to high complex movements with lots of moving parts, such as the barbell squat. ___ For example; breathing patterns, walk out, bracing of the core, descent speed, staying tight etc. should all be the same as if you had 90% of your 1RM on your back; even if its just the bar. Don’t just grab the bar and half-ass the reps to try and reach your working weight, take your time. ___ Warming up is more than just getting your muscles warm, it’s about skill acquisition. Properly done warm up sets will improve your overall technique and form by engraining positive movement patterns. Why try to focus on perfecting form when the bar is already loaded heavy? (which usually doesn’t work anyway). Do it from the beginning so that you don’t get into bad habits. ___ If you wanted to be the best baseball pitcher you could be; would you practice your throws like you would in a game, or rushed and like whatever? The answer is logical and the same applies to lifting. Ever hear the saying, "treat light weight like it's heavy weight so that one day you can move heavy weight like its light weight? Well now you have 😆 ___ Your warm up weights should be based upon your level of strength. Slapping on a 45 every warm up set may be fine if you can squat 600lbs. But if your max is 250, that won’t go so well. This is why I like to use a % based system like above. You may find that this is perfect for you, or that you require less or more warm up sets, it all depends. ___ The point is that you don’t do too much (most people do way too many reps) to where you are fatigued before you actually start; or do too little that your nervous system (or joints) aren’t ready to begin. If you have to do 4x5 with 315lbs, you don’t want your last warm up to be 300x7 lol, that’s going to be exhausting. You want to warm up in an incremental fashion leaving plenty in the tank. Implement this approach into your warm ups and you’ll notice that you are able to lift heavier, safer, and get stronger and more jacked overtime! strengthguide
Ass, Bad, and Baseball: WARM UP SETS
 TREAT LIGHT WEIGHT LIKE IT'S HEAVY WEIGHT
 KEY POINTS:
 PROPER EXAMPLE OF LOADING THE
 BAR FOR YOUR WARM UP SETS:
 Treat all weights like
 its heavy
 Breathing patterns do
 not change
 o Walk out does not
 change
 o Tightness does not
 change
 ·Technique does not
 change period
 ·30% for 6-8 reps
 ·40% for 4-6 reps
 ● 50% for 3-4 reps
 ● 60% for 2 reps
 ·70% for 1 rep
 ·80% for 1 rep
 SG
 BEGIN WORKING SETS
 @strengthguide
 Most peoples technique look completely different when warming up vs
 when they are doing their working sets. There may be some difference
 as you're comparing light weight vs heavy challenging weight nearing
 failure. However, the biggest change you should see is bar speed. Your
 technique and approach on the other hand, should remain the same.
Follow @strengthguide ・・・ We need to be smart about how we go about adding weight to the barbell as well as our execution of the lift during warm ups. Especially when it comes to high complex movements with lots of moving parts, such as the barbell squat. ___ For example; breathing patterns, walk out, bracing of the core, descent speed, staying tight etc. should all be the same as if you had 90% of your 1RM on your back; even if its just the bar. Don’t just grab the bar and half-ass the reps to try and reach your working weight, take your time. ___ Warming up is more than just getting your muscles warm, it’s about skill acquisition. Properly done warm up sets will improve your overall technique and form by engraining positive movement patterns. Why try to focus on perfecting form when the bar is already loaded heavy? (which usually doesn’t work anyway). Do it from the beginning so that you don’t get into bad habits. ___ If you wanted to be the best baseball pitcher you could be; would you practice your throws like you would in a game, or rushed and like whatever? The answer is logical and the same applies to lifting. Ever hear the saying, "treat light weight like it's heavy weight so that one day you can move heavy weight like its light weight? Well now you have 😆 ___ Your warm up weights should be based upon your level of strength. Slapping on a 45 every warm up set may be fine if you can squat 600lbs. But if your max is 250, that won’t go so well. This is why I like to use a % based system like above. You may find that this is perfect for you, or that you require less or more warm up sets, it all depends. ___ The point is that you don’t do too much (most people do way too many reps) to where you are fatigued before you actually start; or do too little that your nervous system (or joints) aren’t ready to begin. If you have to do 4x5 with 315lbs, you don’t want your last warm up to be 300x7 lol, that’s going to be exhausting. You want to warm up in an incremental fashion leaving plenty in the tank. Implement this approach into your warm ups and you’ll notice that you are able to lift heavier, safer, and get stronger and more jacked overtime! strengthguide

Follow @strengthguide ・・・ We need to be smart about how we go about adding weight to the barbell as well as our execution of the lift during...

Definitely, Memes, and Soon...: DELOAD GUIDELINES @strengthguide HOW TO: HOW NOT TO: 3-5 REPS SHY OF FAILURE FAILURE TRAINING (NOT THE TIME) Reduce voluma via number of sets/reps. Volume is the biggest contributor to fatigue. therefore it must be the primary variable that is altered. Keep volume high (eg: completing usual number of total sets per lift/body part). Drop too much weight. Its common an intensitytweight on the bar), by dropping no more than 15% of weight on the bar. If you drop too much weight, everything will feel extremely heavy when you return due to loss of adaptations. dropping load to 60% or even in half. This will surely cause you to lose favorable adaptations, causing you to feel weak upon returning. Maintain training frequency. By maintaining frequency, you wil reduce muscle damage and DOMS when returning to regular training allowing you to jump right back into hard training. Reduce frequency or even take the week off. If you must (vacation. injury etc), then it's fine. But most of the time., you should still come in and complete at least 80% of the work. Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Now that we discussed why de-loads are essential; here we go over the application and how to’s and how not to’s. ___ First off, the longer you have been training and the type of training you do both impact how soon you will need to de-load. Ideally you should never go past 8 weeks without one if you are training consistently and progressively. I recommend de-loading every 4-6 weeks. ___ Since the purpose of the de-load is to reduce fatigue, we want to primarily alter volume. The easiest way to do this is to drop the number of sets. I recommend cutting 1-3-1-2 of the amount of sets you normally do. So 5 sets becomes 3, 4 sets become 2, 3 become 2 etc. If you leave volume high, you won’t recover properly and it’ll be a wasted week with no recovery, yet no further adaptations. ___ Maintain training intensity (weight on the bar) by dropping between 0-15% in weight, depending on the exercise. If you cut way too much, you’ll lose the adaptations and your next squat day will feel like your holding a truck on your back, trust me. Furthermore, you’ll accumulate a lot of muscle damage leaving you sore and unable to resume hard training as quickly. The de-load won’t leave you weak or halt progress if you do it right, it’ll leave you stronger with more predictable progress. ___ Intensity of effort should also be lower. Typically when we train, we ideally want to be within 1-2 sets away from failure by the time we reach the last set on any given exercise. There’s a time and a place for failure training, but de-loads definitely aren’t one of them. So make sure you leave at least 3 reps in the tank on each exercise during your de-load. ___ If you follow these guidelines, don’t try anything new or fancy that you haven’t done in a long time or ever, you’ll recover properly, maintain all your adaptations you worked so hard for, and will be fully capable to resume hard training the following week. strengthguide ___ https:-www.researchgate.net-publication-275036701_Effects_and_Mechanisms_of_Tapering_in_Maximizing_Muscular_Strength
Definitely, Memes, and Soon...: DELOAD GUIDELINES
 @strengthguide
 HOW TO:
 HOW NOT TO:
 3-5 REPS SHY OF FAILURE
 FAILURE TRAINING (NOT THE TIME)
 Reduce voluma via number of
 sets/reps. Volume is the
 biggest contributor to fatigue.
 therefore it must be the primary
 variable that is altered.
 Keep volume high (eg: completing
 usual number of total sets per
 lift/body part).
 Drop too much weight. Its common
 an intensitytweight on the bar),
 by dropping no more than 15% of
 weight on the bar. If you drop too
 much weight, everything will feel
 extremely heavy when you return
 due to loss of adaptations.
 dropping load to 60% or even in
 half. This will surely cause you to
 lose favorable adaptations, causing
 you to feel weak upon returning.
 Maintain training frequency. By
 maintaining frequency, you wil
 reduce muscle damage and DOMS
 when returning to regular training
 allowing you to jump right back
 into hard training.
 Reduce frequency or even take the
 week off. If you must (vacation.
 injury etc), then it's fine. But most
 of the time., you should still come in
 and complete at least 80% of the
 work.
Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Now that we discussed why de-loads are essential; here we go over the application and how to’s and how not to’s. ___ First off, the longer you have been training and the type of training you do both impact how soon you will need to de-load. Ideally you should never go past 8 weeks without one if you are training consistently and progressively. I recommend de-loading every 4-6 weeks. ___ Since the purpose of the de-load is to reduce fatigue, we want to primarily alter volume. The easiest way to do this is to drop the number of sets. I recommend cutting 1-3-1-2 of the amount of sets you normally do. So 5 sets becomes 3, 4 sets become 2, 3 become 2 etc. If you leave volume high, you won’t recover properly and it’ll be a wasted week with no recovery, yet no further adaptations. ___ Maintain training intensity (weight on the bar) by dropping between 0-15% in weight, depending on the exercise. If you cut way too much, you’ll lose the adaptations and your next squat day will feel like your holding a truck on your back, trust me. Furthermore, you’ll accumulate a lot of muscle damage leaving you sore and unable to resume hard training as quickly. The de-load won’t leave you weak or halt progress if you do it right, it’ll leave you stronger with more predictable progress. ___ Intensity of effort should also be lower. Typically when we train, we ideally want to be within 1-2 sets away from failure by the time we reach the last set on any given exercise. There’s a time and a place for failure training, but de-loads definitely aren’t one of them. So make sure you leave at least 3 reps in the tank on each exercise during your de-load. ___ If you follow these guidelines, don’t try anything new or fancy that you haven’t done in a long time or ever, you’ll recover properly, maintain all your adaptations you worked so hard for, and will be fully capable to resume hard training the following week. strengthguide ___ https:-www.researchgate.net-publication-275036701_Effects_and_Mechanisms_of_Tapering_in_Maximizing_Muscular_Strength

Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Now that we discussed why de-loads are essential; here we go over the application and how t...

Being Alone, Massage, and Memes: DYNAMIC STRETCHING IMPROVES PERFORMANCE Dynamic stretching: (Not holding a stretch. more explosive momentum type movements - think arm circles, leg swings etc) @strengthguide SG Dynamic Stretching has been shown to improve performance, the opposite of static stretching. Other benents of dynamic stretching are that they are more specific to what you are going to do (lift, sprint etc) by elevating heart rate, increasing core temperature, and improving vo2 (none of which static stretching does). Thus, it can be said with certainty that performing dynamic stretches (for 5-10min) pre-lifting and avoiding static holds are a great way to get you ready to get under the barbell. Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Dynamic Stretching has been shown to improve performance [1,2], this means an ability to do more reps-weight; while static stretching harms performance. Interestingly enough, for those who can’t grasp the idea yet of letting go of static stretches as part of their warm up routine; research shows that if you perform dynamic stretching AFTER static stretching; it helps offset the negative effects of static stretching resulting in no change in baseline performance [2] ___ If you read my last post you will know that static stretching decreases the stretch reflex of a muscle which causes the reductions in strength; meanwhile, dynamic stretching possibly enhances it by practicing explosive movements. So, static stretching followed by dynamic stretching could be a good way to ease yourself into a new warm up routine that involves little to no static holds. ___ Overtime, you can drop them to the point where you only have dynamic stretches as part of your warm up to get the performance enhancing benefits. It took me a few months to get to that point, now my warm up ritual involves hardly any static holds, is faster, I am stronger, and feel great. In other words, my skeleton did not suddenly break because I didn’t static stretch. ___ If you feel like dynamic stretching alone isn’t enough, you can always use a foam roller (or a massage roller) on a “tight” muscle; as this has been shown to improve range of motion without altering performance capabilities [3,4]. For information on when you can implement static holds without harming performance, see my last post. ___ 1. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-16095425 2. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-15574098 3. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-22580977 4. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pmc-articles-PMC3679629-
Being Alone, Massage, and Memes: DYNAMIC STRETCHING
 IMPROVES PERFORMANCE
 Dynamic stretching: (Not holding a stretch.
 more explosive momentum type movements
 - think arm circles, leg swings etc)
 @strengthguide
 SG
 Dynamic Stretching has been shown to improve performance, the opposite of static
 stretching. Other benents of dynamic stretching are that they are more specific to
 what you are going to do (lift, sprint etc) by elevating heart rate, increasing core
 temperature, and improving vo2 (none of which static stretching does). Thus, it can
 be said with certainty that performing dynamic stretches (for 5-10min) pre-lifting
 and avoiding static holds are a great way to get you ready to get under the barbell.
Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Dynamic Stretching has been shown to improve performance [1,2], this means an ability to do more reps-weight; while static stretching harms performance. Interestingly enough, for those who can’t grasp the idea yet of letting go of static stretches as part of their warm up routine; research shows that if you perform dynamic stretching AFTER static stretching; it helps offset the negative effects of static stretching resulting in no change in baseline performance [2] ___ If you read my last post you will know that static stretching decreases the stretch reflex of a muscle which causes the reductions in strength; meanwhile, dynamic stretching possibly enhances it by practicing explosive movements. So, static stretching followed by dynamic stretching could be a good way to ease yourself into a new warm up routine that involves little to no static holds. ___ Overtime, you can drop them to the point where you only have dynamic stretches as part of your warm up to get the performance enhancing benefits. It took me a few months to get to that point, now my warm up ritual involves hardly any static holds, is faster, I am stronger, and feel great. In other words, my skeleton did not suddenly break because I didn’t static stretch. ___ If you feel like dynamic stretching alone isn’t enough, you can always use a foam roller (or a massage roller) on a “tight” muscle; as this has been shown to improve range of motion without altering performance capabilities [3,4]. For information on when you can implement static holds without harming performance, see my last post. ___ 1. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-16095425 2. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-15574098 3. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pubmed-22580977 4. https:-www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov-pmc-articles-PMC3679629-

Follow @strengthguide for more great content ・・・ Dynamic Stretching has been shown to improve performance [1,2], this means an ability to do...