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taken for granted: Moments taken for granted (2019)
taken for granted: Moments taken for granted (2019)

Moments taken for granted (2019)

taken for granted: Of all the things that we have taken for granted.
taken for granted: Of all the things that we have taken for granted.

Of all the things that we have taken for granted.

taken for granted: life should never be taken for granted.
taken for granted: life should never be taken for granted.

life should never be taken for granted.

taken for granted: So, here's a weird question: If the people who run Exxon (or Walmart, or Goldman Sachs) wound up standing betore God on Judgment Day, surely they'd have to answer for the pollution, tax evasion, wage theft, and whatever backroom deals were made to keep politicians on their side. But in their "positive" column, would the Exxon guys get credit for all of the oil? You know, the fuel that ran the ambulances that took sick people to the hospital, and the farm equipment that grew food for hungry people, and the cars that let people travel to visit lonely relatives? The rich venture capitalist who screwed his employees and owned two sweatshops, but who also invested money in a new life-saving treatment for heart disease -- does he get credit for all of the sick people the invention healed? The Internet loves viral stories about corrupt cops -- do the corrupt cops, upon judgment, get credit for all of the lives they saved and crimes they stopped prevented? Does Steve Jobs only hear about the dead workers at or Foxconn, or does he also get credit for all of the happiness his gadgets have brought people? Does Monsanto get credit for all that corn? Why not? Why would all of the things productive people produce be taken for granted? And we do take them for granted. If I tell you that workers are better off today because the average 1970 worker couldn't afford a smartphone or Internet access regardless of their income, you'll roll your eyes and say, "Well duh, those things didn't exist back then!" OK, so we just take the continued invention of these marvels as if it's as inevitable as the rising of the sun, rather than the dedicated work of people taking risks and getting up early in the morning when they'd prefer to stay home and browse porn? Why can't we acknowledge that those inventions happen because right now we have a system that encourages and rewards their invention? Or that the same system that gave you your iPhone also gave you job uncertainty and poor health benefits? Millions of the people who take to the Internet and scream about how Walmart treats its employees can, in fact, boast that they don't do the same to their employees, but only because they don't have any employees. Because they've never taken that risk or put in those 100-hour weeks to build something up from nothing. So in the process of hating the people who have, shouldn't we also appreciate that our homes are full of the stuff they gave us access to? I know from experience that many of you reading that point not only disagree with it, but are physically angry by it. Actually, you want the world to be bad because it gives you an excuse to withdraw from it. actually made - 7 Reasons the World Looks Worse Than It Really Is, by David Wong I dare ya to prove this genius wrong ! (extract from a Cracked.com article)
taken for granted: So, here's a weird question: If the people who run Exxon (or Walmart, or Goldman Sachs) wound up standing betore
 God on Judgment Day, surely they'd have to answer for the pollution, tax evasion, wage theft, and whatever
 backroom deals were made to keep politicians
 on their side. But in their "positive" column, would the Exxon guys
 get credit for all of the oil? You know, the fuel that ran the ambulances that took sick people to the hospital, and the
 farm equipment that grew food for hungry people, and the cars that let people travel to visit lonely relatives?
 The rich venture capitalist who screwed his employees and owned two sweatshops, but who also invested money in
 a new life-saving treatment for heart disease -- does he get credit for all of the sick people the invention healed?
 The Internet loves viral stories about corrupt cops -- do the corrupt cops, upon judgment, get credit for all of the
 lives they saved and crimes they stopped
 prevented? Does Steve Jobs only hear about the dead workers at
 or
 Foxconn, or does he also get credit for all of the happiness his gadgets have brought people? Does Monsanto get
 credit for all that corn?
 Why not? Why would all of the things productive people produce be taken for granted?
 And we do take them for granted. If I tell you that workers are better off today because the average 1970 worker
 couldn't afford a smartphone or Internet access regardless of their income, you'll roll your eyes and say, "Well duh,
 those things didn't exist back then!" OK, so we just take the continued invention of these marvels as if it's as
 inevitable as the rising of the sun, rather than the dedicated work of people taking risks and getting up early in the
 morning when they'd prefer to stay home and browse porn?
 Why can't we
 acknowledge that those inventions happen because right now we have a system that encourages and
 rewards their invention? Or that the same system that gave you your iPhone also gave you job uncertainty and poor
 health benefits? Millions of the people who take to the Internet and scream about how Walmart treats its
 employees can, in fact, boast that they don't do the same to their employees, but only because they don't have any
 employees. Because they've never taken that risk or put in those 100-hour weeks to build something up from
 nothing. So in the process of hating the people who have, shouldn't we also appreciate that our homes are full of
 the stuff they gave us access to?
 I know from experience that many of you reading that point not only disagree with it, but are
 physically angry by it. Actually, you want the world to be bad because it gives you an excuse to withdraw from it.
 actually made
 - 7 Reasons the World Looks Worse Than It Really Is,
 by David Wong
I dare ya to prove this genius wrong ! (extract from a Cracked.com article)

I dare ya to prove this genius wrong ! (extract from a Cracked.com article)

taken for granted: 20h 4 Awards So, when I became 18, I snapped out of any teen angst I might've had. While I was in that stage, I was really hard on my dad. My sister and mom were too I think the latter doing so partially led to me doing the same. It took me snapping out of it to realise that and I felt horrible when I did. He was doing the best he could. He'd managed to provide a roof, money, and whatnot for two decades without so much as a "Thank you." On Christmas Day, I wrote my dad a note telling him that I now appreciate al he's done and continues to do for us, apologised for being hard on him for years and promised that I would never treat him that way again. It was essentially just a note to tell him "Thanks," and I paired it with a "No. 1 Dad" mug because it had never felt right to get him anything like that before then. He absolutely balled his eyes out reading the note and opening the mug. Because of that, I nearly did the same. Then he came over and gave me a hug. It's the only time I can remember hugging my dad without it being a "Goodbye," but rather just an "I love you"-hug. It's also the only time I've seen him cry other than when our longtime pet cat died and even then, he didn't do that openly and in front of us. Since then, he has been noticeably happier and our relationship is absolutely ten times better than it was. This is all to say that I can attest to dads having it tough and being taken for granted. Somewhat off-topic I guess but it was enough to remind me of the whole thing. There was more to it than I mentioned, like that he wasn't a paragon himself, but that's the gist. TL;DR: Don't be too hard on your dad and let him know that you appreciate him, for fuck's sake.* Reply 2.6k 19h This almost made me cry too damn 495 AskReddit can be so happy sometimes…
taken for granted: 20h
 4 Awards
 So, when I became 18, I snapped out of any teen angst I might've had. While I
 was in that stage, I was really hard on my dad. My sister and mom were too I
 think the latter doing so partially led to me doing the same. It took me snapping
 out of it to realise that and I felt horrible when I did. He was doing the best he
 could. He'd managed to provide a roof, money, and whatnot for two decades
 without so much as a "Thank you."
 On Christmas Day, I wrote my dad a note telling him that I now appreciate al
 he's done and continues to do for us, apologised for being hard on him for years
 and promised that I would never treat him that way again. It was essentially just
 a note to tell him "Thanks," and I paired it with a "No. 1 Dad" mug because it
 had never felt right to get him anything like that before then.
 He absolutely balled his eyes out reading the note and opening the mug.
 Because of that, I nearly did the same. Then he came over and gave me a hug.
 It's the only time I can remember hugging my dad without it being a "Goodbye,"
 but rather just an "I love you"-hug. It's also the only time I've seen him cry other
 than when our longtime pet cat died and even then, he didn't do that openly
 and in front of us. Since then, he has been noticeably happier and our
 relationship is absolutely ten times better than it was.
 This is all to say that I can attest to dads having it tough and being taken for
 granted. Somewhat off-topic I guess but it was enough to remind me of the
 whole thing. There was more to it than I mentioned, like that he wasn't a
 paragon himself, but that's the gist.
 TL;DR: Don't be too hard on your dad and let him know that you appreciate
 him, for fuck's sake.*
 Reply
 2.6k
 19h
 This almost made me cry too damn
 495
AskReddit can be so happy sometimes…

AskReddit can be so happy sometimes…