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Children, Head, and Mood: nothingbutamother: dynastylnoire: ladycedar: There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives. Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly. After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down. Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them. art therapy is important. You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them. This is seriously so wonderful. It’s easy to write certain kids off as “bad kids” but it’s important to remember that they’re kids. That kid who yells and cusses and throws chairs has absolute turmoil inside their little mind and has no idea how to deal with it. Instead of contributing to the madness, find a way to redirect the frustration. Teach them how to deal with stress in a healthy way. Children. Have. To. Be. Taught.
Children, Head, and Mood: nothingbutamother:
dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.
Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.
After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.
Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them.


This is seriously so wonderful. It’s easy to write certain kids off as “bad kids” but it’s important to remember that they’re kids. That kid who yells and cusses and throws chairs has absolute turmoil inside their little mind and has no idea how to deal with it. Instead of contributing to the madness, find a way to redirect the frustration. Teach them how to deal with stress in a healthy way. Children. Have. To. Be. Taught.

nothingbutamother: dynastylnoire: ladycedar: There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel...

America, Bad, and Children: There is no such thing as an American dream n Europe we try to be civil and have empathy queeranarchism: queerautism: queeranarchism: love-geofffree: designatedheckingadult: queeranarchism: LOL NOPE Europe is racist as fuck. Europe has armed gaurds and high fences on its borders. Europe makes it illegal to rescue refugees at sea. Europe locks up refugee children. Europe has killer cops that shoot teenagers of color. Europe is full of fascist politicians nostalgically fantasizing about ethnic cleansing. Not a day goes by without attacks on Muslims. Fuck Europe. Can confirm. The problem with England (I can’t talk for the rest of Europe) is that our racism and our xenophobia and all our bigoted views manifest in a different way then America, and we use this to claim that it doesn’t exist, even when our country is built on it. We are taught that the British empire was a good thing, and pretty much no one here knows anything about colionisation and our role in most current world problems. But the amount of times that I’ve tried to talk about any issue within England and been shut down with the claim “well we’re not as bad as America”. That’s why the trump protests were so important. We are constantly looking to America to justify our own bigotry. We’ll call America out on their unjust wars, and ignore the fact our own army and government was supporting them. Listen, I like my country- I like that we have a rich history (not that I support it, but heck, everyone likes learning about the Roman Empire, doesn’t mean they think it’s a good thing), I like that we have countrysides and big diverse towns like London, I like that we love fish and chips and curry sauce, I love our old pubs and traditional pub food, I like that we have the NHS (though I dislike how it’s run), I like our sense of dry gallows humour, I like our film and tv industry, I love our history of theatre, I love our myths and legends. But god damn are we historically an awful country, and have we ever tried to make reparations? Our actions are still affecting other countries and ruining life. I don’t like the empire, I don’t like what the monarchy stands for, I don’t like our politicians that spew bigotry and hate, I don’t like our press which are like vultures, I don’t like the power the BBC has to cover-up actual sexual abuse and rape, I hate Katie Hopkins and that she has any platform to spew her hate, I hate Brexit and that it was founded on hate, I hate how we think our lives are more valuable than that of refuges or immigrants, I hate that we don’t think that we are directly or indirectly responsible for a lot of the refugees and asylum seekers that exist today, I hate that we have a system that is actively leading to the deaths of disabled people and that even when investigated by the UN and told to change because we were violating human rights we refused, I hate how we support America’s bigotry and then use their country as a shield when accused of our own bigotry. I hate that we, as a country, are incapable of accepting responsibility and making amends for our terrible actions. Incredibly well put. One of the tricky things is that every European country has their own fictional self image which it keeps repeating to convince itself it’s not a bigoted shithole. In the UK it’s very much focused on being better than the US, being civilized and polite and stylish, while.. ya know… having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. In the Netherlands it’s focused on being ‘tolerant’ and gay-friendly and having semi-legal weed, while.. ya know… having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing.  In Germany it’s focused on having ‘learned from the second world war’ and being ‘better now, while . . ya know… having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. And so on.. every European country considers itself either an underdog or a pioneer or a peak of civilization or small and quirky and of course they all consider themselves so much better than the US while doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing.  https://metro.co.uk/2016/10/27/man-severely-beaten-after-being-told-to-speak-f-english-speaks-out-6218523/ I still remember exactly how it felt to read about this man being brutally asssulted, HIT ON THE FACE WITH A PLANK OF WOOD, in London, a city I lived next to and visited all the time, simple because he was speaking my native language in public. I remember breaking down sobbing because of how many people in this country I love hate me so fucking much for being born somewhere else. IIRC, there was another similar incident on the underground this past April. So tell me more about the supposed lack of xenophobia and racism in Europe These sort of things are sometimes best articulated by people who did not grow up here and suddenly experience it all at once. Pretty much every exchange student of color that I’ve spoken to in the Netherlands has recounted an experience to me that went pretty much like this: Day 1: “Yay! The Netherlands! Country of tolerance and gay rights!” Day 2: “Huh, that person was really friendly to me and did like 15 micro-aggression, that was weird” Day 4: “Waaaaaiiitt… why does this happen constantly? Are people messing with me?  Am I imagining this? Do I just misunderstand their culture? The Netherlands can’t be this racist.” Day 10: “Oh my god, I’m not imagining it, people actually are this racist and they think they’re not! WTF” Day 12: “Holy crap, if I try to point out a micro-aggression people go from super friendly to hyper aggressive screaming in my face in about 5 seconds. And people I thought I could trust jump to their defense. What is this hellscape?” Day 13: “Everything I thought I knew about the Netherlands is wrong. This place is so racist.” Day 14: “Holy crap, is that a primary school teacher in black face?” A Muslim girl was drowned in a river by school bullies and found with bite marks and the police are trying to write it off as her forgetting she couldn’t swim and jumping in the river to cool down? A local fisherman saw it all but was written off as being drunk even though he wasn’t. The school of the girl and the bullies is trying to change it’s name so it will no longer be associated with the incident.The school was Broad Oak Sports College. The river was River Irwell in Bury, Greater Manchester. The girl was Shukri Abdi and she was 12 years old and her and her family recently moved from Somalia. She was the eldest of 5 and her mum is completely distraught, and her uncle has been trying to point out that it wasn’t just a “tragic accident”.Racism still exists in the most horrific forms in the UK.
America, Bad, and Children: There is no such thing as an American
 dream n Europe we try to be civil
 and have empathy
queeranarchism:

queerautism:

queeranarchism:


love-geofffree:

designatedheckingadult:


queeranarchism:

LOL NOPE
Europe is racist as fuck. Europe has armed gaurds and high fences on its borders. Europe makes it illegal to rescue refugees at sea. Europe locks up refugee children. Europe has killer cops that shoot teenagers of color. Europe is full of fascist politicians nostalgically fantasizing about ethnic cleansing. Not a day goes by without attacks on Muslims. 
Fuck Europe.

Can confirm.


The problem with England (I can’t talk for the rest of Europe) is that our racism and our xenophobia and all our bigoted views manifest in a different way then America, and we use this to claim that it doesn’t exist, even when our country is built on it.
We are taught that the British empire was a good thing, and pretty much no one here knows anything about colionisation and our role in most current world problems.
But the amount of times that I’ve tried to talk about any issue within England and been shut down with the claim “well we’re not as bad as America”. 
That’s why the trump protests were so important. We are constantly looking to America to justify our own bigotry. We’ll call America out on their unjust wars, and ignore the fact our own army and government was supporting them.
Listen, I like my country- I like that we have a rich history (not that I support it, but heck, everyone likes learning about the Roman Empire, doesn’t mean they think it’s a good thing), I like that we have countrysides and big diverse towns like London, I like that we love fish and chips and curry sauce, I love our old pubs and traditional pub food, I like that we have the NHS (though I dislike how it’s run), I like our sense of dry gallows humour, I like our film and tv industry, I love our history of theatre, I love our myths and legends.
But god damn are we historically an awful country, and have we ever tried to make reparations? Our actions are still affecting other countries and ruining life. I don’t like the empire, I don’t like what the monarchy stands for, I don’t like our politicians that spew bigotry and hate, I don’t like our press which are like vultures, I don’t like the power the BBC has to cover-up actual sexual abuse and rape, I hate Katie Hopkins and that she has any platform to spew her hate, I hate Brexit and that it was founded on hate, I hate how we think our lives are more valuable than that of refuges or immigrants, I hate that we don’t think that we are directly or indirectly responsible for a lot of the refugees and asylum seekers that exist today, I hate that we have a system that is actively leading to the deaths of disabled people and that even when investigated by the UN and told to change because we were violating human rights we refused, I hate how we support America’s bigotry and then use their country as a shield when accused of our own bigotry. 
I hate that we, as a country, are incapable of accepting responsibility and making amends for our terrible actions. 

Incredibly well put. 
One of the tricky things is that every European country has their own fictional self image which it keeps repeating to convince itself it’s not a bigoted shithole.
In the UK it’s very much focused on being better than the US, being civilized and polite and stylish, while.. ya know… having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. 
In the Netherlands it’s focused on being ‘tolerant’ and gay-friendly and having semi-legal weed, while.. ya know… 
having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. 
In Germany it’s focused on having ‘learned from the second world war’ and being ‘better now, while .
. ya know… 



having a lot of blood on its hands and doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. 
And so on.. every European country considers itself either an underdog or a pioneer or a peak of civilization or small and quirky and of course they all consider themselves so much better than the US while 
doing all the same racist and bigoted shit everyone else is doing. 


https://metro.co.uk/2016/10/27/man-severely-beaten-after-being-told-to-speak-f-english-speaks-out-6218523/
I still remember exactly how it felt to read about this man being brutally asssulted, HIT ON THE FACE WITH A PLANK OF WOOD, in London, a city I lived next to and visited all the time, simple because he was speaking my native language in public. 
I remember breaking down sobbing because of how many people in this country I love hate me so fucking much for being born somewhere else. 
IIRC, there was another similar incident on the underground this past April. 
So tell me more about the supposed lack of xenophobia and racism in Europe


These sort of things are sometimes best articulated by people who did not grow up here and suddenly experience it all at once. Pretty much every exchange student of color that I’ve spoken to in the Netherlands has recounted an experience to me

that went pretty much like this:
Day 1: “Yay! The Netherlands! Country of tolerance and gay rights!”
Day 2: “Huh, that person was really friendly to me and did like 15 micro-aggression, that was weird”
Day 4: “Waaaaaiiitt… why does this happen constantly? Are people messing with me?  Am I imagining this? Do I just misunderstand their culture? The Netherlands can’t be this racist.”
Day 10: “Oh my god, I’m not imagining it, people actually are this racist and they think they’re not! WTF”
Day 12: “Holy crap, if I try to point out a micro-aggression people go from super friendly to hyper aggressive screaming in my face in about 5 seconds. And people I thought I could trust jump to their defense. What is this hellscape?”
Day 13: “Everything I thought I knew about the Netherlands is wrong. This place is so racist.”
Day 14: “Holy crap, is that a primary school teacher in black face?” 

A Muslim girl was drowned in a river by school bullies and found with bite marks and the police are trying to write it off as her forgetting she couldn’t swim and jumping in the river to cool down? A local fisherman saw it all but was written off as being drunk even though he wasn’t. The school of the girl and the bullies is trying to change it’s name so it will no longer be associated with the incident.The school was Broad Oak Sports College. The river was River Irwell in Bury, Greater Manchester. The girl was Shukri Abdi and she was 12 years old and her and her family recently moved from Somalia. She was the eldest of 5 and her mum is completely distraught, and her uncle has been trying to point out that it wasn’t just a “tragic accident”.Racism still exists in the most horrific forms in the UK.

queeranarchism: queerautism: queeranarchism: love-geofffree: designatedheckingadult: queeranarchism: LOL NOPE Europe is racist as fu...

Children, Comfortable, and Parents: AHSIEH Should Climate Change Be Taught In School? Schools should teach about Schools should teach that Schools should not teach Don't know climate change and its impacts on our environment, economy and society anything about climate change climate change exists, but not the potential impacts 100% 6% 7% 9% 13% 17% 8% 6% 10% 10% 80% 12% 16% 17% 12% 60% 17% 81% 40% 74% 68% 66% 49% 20% 0% Overall Teachers Parents Democrats Republicans Source: NPR/lpsos polls of 1,007 U.S. adults conducted March 21-22 and 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 3.5 percentage points; parents, 7.3 percentage points; and teachers, 5.0 percentage points. Totals may not add up to 100 percent because of rounding. npr Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR Teachers Who Cover Climate Change Differ From Those Who Don't Teach climate change All teachers Don't teach climate change Overall: 71% I feel comfortable answering students' questions about climate change 91% 56% Overall: 52% There should be state laws in place that require teaching climate change 38% 70% Thave the resources I need to answer students' questions about climate change Overall: 51% 77% 32% Overall: 41% My students have brought up climate change in the classroom this year 14% 78% My school or school district encourages us to discuss climate change in the Overall: 37% classroom 64% 18% Overall: 29% I worry about parent complaints when it comes to teaching climate change 29% 30% Overall: 21% I would be personally uncomfortable if I had to teach about climate change 15% 27% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Source: NPR/Ipsos polls of 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 5 percentage points. npr Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR npr: More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school. A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught. These polls are among the first to gauge public and teacher opinion on how climate change should be taught to the generation that in the coming years will face its intensifying consequences: children. And yet, as millions of students around the globe participate in Earth Day events on Monday, our poll also found a disconnect. Although most states have classroom standards that at least mention human-caused climate change, most teachers aren’t actually talking about climate change in their classrooms. And fewer than half of parents have discussed the issue with their children. Most Teachers Don’t Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPRCharts: Alyson Hurt/NPR
Children, Comfortable, and Parents: AHSIEH

 Should Climate Change Be Taught In School?
 Schools should teach about
 Schools should teach that
 Schools should not teach
 Don't know
 climate change and its impacts
 on our environment, economy
 and society
 anything about climate change
 climate change exists, but not
 the potential impacts
 100%
 6%
 7%
 9%
 13%
 17%
 8%
 6%
 10%
 10%
 80%
 12%
 16%
 17%
 12%
 60%
 17%
 81%
 40%
 74%
 68%
 66%
 49%
 20%
 0%
 Overall
 Teachers
 Parents
 Democrats
 Republicans
 Source: NPR/lpsos polls of 1,007 U.S. adults conducted March 21-22 and 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall
 sample is 3.5 percentage points; parents, 7.3 percentage points; and teachers, 5.0 percentage points. Totals may not add up to 100 percent because
 of rounding.
 npr
 Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

 Teachers Who Cover Climate Change Differ From Those Who Don't
 Teach climate change
 All teachers
 Don't teach climate change
 Overall: 71%
 I feel comfortable answering students'
 questions about climate change
 91%
 56%
 Overall: 52%
 There should be state laws in place that
 require teaching climate change
 38%
 70%
 Thave the resources I need to answer
 students' questions about
 climate change
 Overall: 51%
 77%
 32%
 Overall: 41%
 My students have brought up climate
 change in the classroom this year
 14%
 78%
 My school or school district encourages
 us to discuss climate change in the
 Overall: 37%
 classroom
 64%
 18%
 Overall: 29%
 I worry about parent complaints when it
 comes to teaching climate change
 29% 30%
 Overall: 21%
 I would be personally uncomfortable if I
 had to teach about climate change
 15%
 27%
 0%
 25%
 50%
 75%
 100%
 Source: NPR/Ipsos polls of 505 teachers conducted March 21-29. The credibility interval for the overall sample is 5 percentage points.
 npr
 Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR
npr:
More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school.
A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught.
These polls are among the first to gauge public and teacher opinion on how climate change should be taught to the generation that in the coming years will face its intensifying consequences: children.
And yet, as millions of students around the globe participate in Earth Day events on Monday, our poll also found a disconnect. Although most states have classroom standards that at least mention human-caused climate change, most teachers aren’t actually talking about climate change in their classrooms. And fewer than half of parents have discussed the issue with their children.
Most Teachers Don’t Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did
Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPRCharts: Alyson Hurt/NPR

npr: More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to t...