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the muses: In Disney's Hercules (1997), the Muses are both a literal and metaphorical Greek chorus.
 the muses: In Disney's Hercules (1997), the Muses are both a literal and metaphorical Greek chorus.

In Disney's Hercules (1997), the Muses are both a literal and metaphorical Greek chorus.

the muses: In Hercules (1997), when the muses start singing to Megan, she yells "Oh no". This is because she is racist.
 the muses: In Hercules (1997), when the muses start singing to Megan, she yells "Oh no". This is because she is racist.

In Hercules (1997), when the muses start singing to Megan, she yells "Oh no". This is because she is racist.

the muses: G hymen Google SeX https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&sxsrf-ACYBGNQx-2VDh_1dBfaQLNqDAtO Google а hymen Images Q All Videos Shopping News More Settings Tools About 269,000 results (0.49 seconds) Hymen. Hymen, also called Hymenaeus, in Greek mythology, the god of marriage, whose name derives from the refrain of an ancient marriage song. Unknown to Homer, he was mentioned first by the 5th-century-bc lyric poet Pindar as the son of Apollo by one of the Muses. Jul 18, 2019 en.wikiped. Hymen | Greek mythology | Britannica.com https://www.britannica.com topic > Hymen-Greek-mythology About Featured Snippets Feedback Hymen | Greek mythology | Britannica.com https://www.britannica.com> topic > Hymen-Greek-mythology Jul 18, 2019 - Hymen. Hymen, also called Hymenaeus, in Greek mythology, the god of marriage, whose name derives from the refrain of an ancient marriage song. Unknown to Homer, he was mentioned first by the 5th-century-bc lyric poet Pindar as the son of Apollo by one of the Muses. Hymen (god) Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org wiki Hymen_(god) Jump to Mythology O Hymen, king of marriage! blest is the bridegroom; blest am I also, the maiden soon to wed a princely lord in Argos. Hail Hymen, king Symbol: Bridal torch Siblings: Priapos Parents: Ariadne Dionysos Function and representation Later story of origin Hymen | Encyclopedia Mythica For my fellow 9 year olds wondering what Pewds meant when he said "pop the hymen," here ya go
 the muses: G hymen
 Google SeX
 https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&sxsrf-ACYBGNQx-2VDh_1dBfaQLNqDAtO
 Google
 а
 hymen
 Images
 Q All
 Videos
 Shopping
 News
 More
 Settings
 Tools
 About 269,000 results (0.49 seconds)
 Hymen. Hymen, also called Hymenaeus, in Greek mythology, the god
 of marriage, whose name derives from the refrain of an ancient marriage
 song. Unknown to Homer, he was mentioned first by the 5th-century-bc
 lyric poet Pindar as the son of Apollo by one of the Muses. Jul 18, 2019
 en.wikiped.
 Hymen | Greek mythology | Britannica.com
 https://www.britannica.com topic > Hymen-Greek-mythology
 About Featured Snippets
 Feedback
 Hymen | Greek mythology | Britannica.com
 https://www.britannica.com> topic > Hymen-Greek-mythology
 Jul 18, 2019 - Hymen. Hymen, also called Hymenaeus, in Greek mythology, the god of
 marriage, whose name derives from the refrain of an ancient marriage song. Unknown to
 Homer, he was mentioned first by the 5th-century-bc lyric poet Pindar as the son of Apollo by
 one of the Muses.
 Hymen (god) Wikipedia
 https://en.wikipedia.org wiki Hymen_(god)
 Jump to Mythology O Hymen, king of marriage! blest is the bridegroom; blest am I also, the
 maiden soon to wed a princely lord in Argos. Hail Hymen, king
 Symbol: Bridal torch
 Siblings: Priapos
 Parents: Ariadne Dionysos
 Function and representation Later story of origin
 Hymen | Encyclopedia Mythica
For my fellow 9 year olds wondering what Pewds meant when he said "pop the hymen," here ya go

For my fellow 9 year olds wondering what Pewds meant when he said "pop the hymen," here ya go

the muses: HARPIES SPHINX MEDUSA SIRENS mohtz: Greek Mythology | Monsters The Goddesses | The Lovers | The Constellations | The Muses twitter / ig / prints
 the muses: HARPIES

 SPHINX

 MEDUSA

 SIRENS
mohtz:


Greek Mythology | Monsters
The Goddesses | The Lovers | The Constellations | The Muses

twitter / ig / prints

mohtz: Greek Mythology | Monsters The Goddesses | The Lovers | The Constellations | The Muses twitter / ig / prints

the muses: This generation has disposed of the anchor of aesthetics - decisively cut off with a military grade set of colossal diamond bolt cutters - and with it all access to and appreciation for the art of the past. The compulsion-to-share in which this "artist" gloriously basks and for which she proudly stands is nothing more than a servile anchor dropped through the middle of the boat by a careless, culturally insensitive mob determined to equitize emotional responses to art by drowning the lot of us in pathetic drivel (and yes, I mean the rampant deployment of pathos as a weapon of mass media). Not content to leave the hypothermic masses clinging to some hope of rescue amidst the wreckage of our own insipid navel-gazing (to be sure, one can still - if with some difficulty - gaze at the navel while wearing a standard issue cruise-liner lifejacket in the midst of the swelling onslaught of a Pacific storm, our culture is ready to inform us (from the loudspeaker of some overhead rescue helicopter delicately pimped out in the latest stamp of Hollywood fame - not the sexually perverse kind mind you, but the good wholesome, soul-sucking kind that beckons us all to the theater in our legions - sent to swoop in and rescue those individuals caught up in the mass hysteria which caused the anchor to plummet through the bowels of the World Ship of Art in the first place) that we are all true and virtuous martyrs for the rights of the artist - that perennial and bowel-inducing grind of protestation which haunts each would-be versifier, playwright, or palette-twirler - who will be honoured with the establishment of a monument to the Muses (on Facebook) and hash-tagged vociferously until the end of the week. As we freeze to death in this culturally sodden sea of mediocrity, there is some comfort that the rising generation will have no knowledge of our whereabouts, find no wreckage or trace of our mishap, and be quite content to continue the artistic tradition with true judgement's of taste because we are decidedly out of cell range Like Reply O 2 . Yesterday at 1:53am
 the muses: This generation has disposed of the anchor of
 aesthetics - decisively cut off with a military grade set of colossal
 diamond bolt cutters - and with it all access to and appreciation for the art
 of the past. The compulsion-to-share in which this "artist" gloriously
 basks and for which she proudly stands is nothing more than a servile
 anchor dropped through the middle of the boat by a careless, culturally
 insensitive mob determined to equitize emotional responses to art by
 drowning the lot of us in pathetic drivel (and yes, I mean the rampant
 deployment of pathos as a weapon of mass media). Not content to leave
 the hypothermic masses clinging to some hope of rescue amidst the
 wreckage of our own insipid navel-gazing (to be sure, one can still - if
 with some difficulty - gaze at the navel while wearing a standard issue
 cruise-liner lifejacket in the midst of the swelling onslaught of a Pacific
 storm, our culture is ready to inform us (from the loudspeaker of some
 overhead rescue helicopter delicately pimped out in the latest stamp of
 Hollywood fame - not the sexually perverse kind mind you, but the good
 wholesome, soul-sucking kind that beckons us all to the theater in our
 legions - sent to swoop in and rescue those individuals caught up in the
 mass hysteria which caused the anchor to plummet through the bowels
 of the World Ship of Art in the first place) that we are all true and virtuous
 martyrs for the rights of the artist - that perennial and bowel-inducing
 grind of protestation which haunts each would-be versifier, playwright, or
 palette-twirler - who will be honoured with the establishment of a
 monument to the Muses (on Facebook) and hash-tagged vociferously
 until the end of the week. As we freeze to death in this culturally sodden
 sea of mediocrity, there is some comfort that the rising generation will
 have no knowledge of our whereabouts, find no wreckage or trace of our
 mishap, and be quite content to continue the artistic tradition with true
 judgement's of taste because we are decidedly out of cell range
 Like Reply O 2 . Yesterday at 1:53am
the muses: Work of the Muses.
nsfw
 the muses: Work of the Muses.

Work of the Muses.

the muses: CatCsn The cousin to the Muse is working hard today. She thinks she looks a lot like @pudgethecat btw.
 the muses: CatCsn
The cousin to the Muse is working hard today. She thinks she looks a lot like @pudgethecat btw.

The cousin to the Muse is working hard today. She thinks she looks a lot like @pudgethecat btw.

the muses: Beyonce/Sasha nce picslastslonger Euterpe was one of the young, beautiful maidens referred to as the Nine Muses. The nine Muses were the daughters of Zeus, the king of the gods, and Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory. The names of the nine Muses were Clio, Thalia, Erato, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Calliope, Terpsichore, Urania and Melpomene. Euterpe and her sisters were believed to reside above the golden clouds that covered sacred the Greek mountain peaks above the summits of Mounts Olympus, Helicon, Parnassus, and Pindus. They entertained and joined the Olympian gods in their feasts drinking water, milk, and honey, but never wine. The sisters were originally the patron goddesses of poets and musicians but over time their roles extended to include comedy, tragedy, history, poetry, music, dancing, singing, rhetoric, sacred hymns, and harmony. Euterpe was the Muse of Music.According to the traditions and beliefs of the Ancient Greeks musicians would invoke the aid of Euterpe, the Muse of Music, to inspire, guide and assist him in his compositions. The invocation took the form of a prayer for divine inspiration from the goddess. The modern word 'music' derives from the Muses. Music in Ancient Greece played a vital role in the daily lives of all the ancient Greeks. Music was played at marriages, funerals, religious ceremonies, games, theatre and the ballad-like reciting of epic poetry. The ancient Greeks used string, wind, and percussion musical instruments. Euterpe was said to have invented the flute and other wind instruments and her symbol was the Aulos, a type of double flute. The sound of the Aulos was described as "penetrating, insisting and exciting".-the aulos was also associated with Apollo, sun god and accompanied the hoplites into battle. The muse and goddess Euterpe was not only gifted as an inspiration of Music but, like all nymphs possessed the gift of prophecy. The mountain spring on Mount Parnassus was sacred to Euterpe and the other Muses. The mountain spring flowed between two high rocks above the city of Delphi, and in ancient times its sacred waters were introduced into a square stone basin, where they were retained for the use of the Pythia, the priests, priestesses and the oracle
 the muses: Beyonce/Sasha
 nce
 picslastslonger
Euterpe was one of the young, beautiful maidens referred to as the Nine Muses. The nine Muses were the daughters of Zeus, the king of the gods, and Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory. The names of the nine Muses were Clio, Thalia, Erato, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Calliope, Terpsichore, Urania and Melpomene. Euterpe and her sisters were believed to reside above the golden clouds that covered sacred the Greek mountain peaks above the summits of Mounts Olympus, Helicon, Parnassus, and Pindus. They entertained and joined the Olympian gods in their feasts drinking water, milk, and honey, but never wine. The sisters were originally the patron goddesses of poets and musicians but over time their roles extended to include comedy, tragedy, history, poetry, music, dancing, singing, rhetoric, sacred hymns, and harmony. Euterpe was the Muse of Music.According to the traditions and beliefs of the Ancient Greeks musicians would invoke the aid of Euterpe, the Muse of Music, to inspire, guide and assist him in his compositions. The invocation took the form of a prayer for divine inspiration from the goddess. The modern word 'music' derives from the Muses. Music in Ancient Greece played a vital role in the daily lives of all the ancient Greeks. Music was played at marriages, funerals, religious ceremonies, games, theatre and the ballad-like reciting of epic poetry. The ancient Greeks used string, wind, and percussion musical instruments. Euterpe was said to have invented the flute and other wind instruments and her symbol was the Aulos, a type of double flute. The sound of the Aulos was described as "penetrating, insisting and exciting".-the aulos was also associated with Apollo, sun god and accompanied the hoplites into battle. The muse and goddess Euterpe was not only gifted as an inspiration of Music but, like all nymphs possessed the gift of prophecy. The mountain spring on Mount Parnassus was sacred to Euterpe and the other Muses. The mountain spring flowed between two high rocks above the city of Delphi, and in ancient times its sacred waters were introduced into a square stone basin, where they were retained for the use of the Pythia, the priests, priestesses and the oracle

Euterpe was one of the young, beautiful maidens referred to as the Nine Muses. The nine Muses were the daughters of Zeus, the king of the...