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Anaconda, Energy, and Funny: t1 Gravitas Free Zone Retweeted db pooper @lonelydandruff 2h I just realised americans think their medicine costs as much as they're charged for it Your Trusted Wizard @Choplogik iguess if i was an american & saw all the wildly exorbitant medical bills people get i would wonder how universal healthcare'd get paid for 07 216 357 queeranarchism: flyingfishtailoutpost1: thebibliosphere: lizardtitties: withasmoothroundstone: robstmartin: titleknown: Blogging this tweet because this explains SO MUCH about the mindset of pretty much all the folks I’ve known who’re against single-payer, it’s not even funny… This…. This never occurred to me. Not once. That Americans are against Health Care because they think it actually costs tens of thousands of dollars for a broken arm, hundreds of thousands for a complicated birth, millions for cancer treatment. Because they’ve never known anything different. The idea that a broken arm is only a couple hundred bucks; a complicated birth a couple thousand; cancer treatment only tens of thousands; all easily covered by existing tax structures. This explains a lot.  And it’s a good example of what I was talking about in my post on scarcity being used to prop up ableism – always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.  Even if it seems obvious that it is, quite often that’s the result of careful manipulation and misconceptions that you’re not even aware of.   And never think you’re too smart to be fooled by that kind of thing, it doesn’t work like that.  Similarly, don’t think people who are fooled by something are stupid.  Nobody can have all the information about everything, and nobody has the time and energy to investigate and put together conscious conclusions about every piece of information they’re given.  It doesn’t take being stupid, or even just gullible, to believe something like this. I currently live in a country without free medical care and still, it’s enormously cheap compared to the USA. An American expat wrote a piece for our English language paper about how she paid more for parking at the hospital than giving birth to her baby that’s pretty interesting: https://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2016/01/06/healthcare-in-iceland-vs-the-us-weve-got-it-so-good/ Yesterday I had to go to the hospital cause I injured my eye, I’m frankly dreading what the bill is going to be, but what made me balk was being told in the pharmacy that my insurance was denied for the antibiotic eye drops and it’d be over $100 out of pocket. So I didn’t get my eyedrops. I’ve had these same drops before living in the UK. They cost me seven GBP. It’s the exact same drug, same steroid, same strain of antibiotic. But somehow the US gets away with charging $100 for a generic non brand version of a drug which is easy to create and widely used. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. You keep the poor poor by making sure basic necessities remain unattainable and then you make it seem like the norm so no one fights it. The rest of the world is not like this. Eat the rich. Resist. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. THIS. THISTHISTHIS. THIS IS WHAT I KEEP TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE. This  always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.
Anaconda, Energy, and Funny: t1 Gravitas Free Zone Retweeted
 db pooper @lonelydandruff 2h
 I just realised americans think their medicine costs as much as they're
 charged for it
 Your Trusted Wizard @Choplogik
 iguess if i was an american & saw all the wildly exorbitant medical bills
 people get i would wonder how universal healthcare'd get paid for
 07
 216
 357
queeranarchism:
flyingfishtailoutpost1:

thebibliosphere:

lizardtitties:

withasmoothroundstone:


robstmartin:

titleknown:
Blogging this tweet because this explains SO MUCH about the mindset of pretty much all the folks I’ve known who’re against single-payer, it’s not even funny…
This….
This never occurred to me. Not once. That Americans are against Health Care because they think it actually costs tens of thousands of dollars for a broken arm, hundreds of thousands for a complicated birth, millions for cancer treatment.
Because they’ve never known anything different. The idea that a broken arm is only a couple hundred bucks; a complicated birth a couple thousand; cancer treatment only tens of thousands; all easily covered by existing tax structures.

This explains a lot.  And it’s a good example of what I was talking about in my post on scarcity being used to prop up ableism – always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.  Even if it seems obvious that it is, quite often that’s the result of careful manipulation and misconceptions that you’re not even aware of.  
And never think you’re too smart to be fooled by that kind of thing, it doesn’t work like that.  Similarly, don’t think people who are fooled by something are stupid.  Nobody can have all the information about everything, and nobody has the time and energy to investigate and put together conscious conclusions about every piece of information they’re given.  It doesn’t take being stupid, or even just gullible, to believe something like this.


I currently live in a country without free medical care and still, it’s enormously cheap compared to the USA. An American expat wrote a piece for our English language paper about how she paid more for parking at the hospital than giving birth to her baby that’s pretty interesting:
https://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2016/01/06/healthcare-in-iceland-vs-the-us-weve-got-it-so-good/

Yesterday I had to go to the hospital cause I injured my eye, I’m frankly dreading what the bill is going to be, but what made me balk was being told in the pharmacy that my insurance was denied for the antibiotic eye drops and it’d be over $100 out of pocket. So I didn’t get my eyedrops.

I’ve had these same drops before living in the UK. They cost me seven GBP.

It’s the exact same drug, same steroid, same strain of antibiotic. But somehow the US gets away with charging $100 for a generic non brand version of a drug which is easy to create and widely used. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. You keep the poor poor by making sure basic necessities remain unattainable and then you make it seem like the norm so no one fights it.

The rest of the world is not like this.

Eat the rich. Resist.
It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare.


THIS. THISTHISTHIS. THIS IS WHAT I KEEP TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE. 

This  always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.

queeranarchism: flyingfishtailoutpost1: thebibliosphere: lizardtitties: withasmoothroundstone: robstmartin: titleknown: Blogging this ...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care: The infamous $629 bandaid Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US Just… facility fees Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis) Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x) People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
corvussy:
thatpettyblackgirl:


the US has no excuse


some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:

The infamous $629 bandaid
Woman charged $40 for holding her baby after a c-section
Two South Korean tourists took their baby to the ER where he was only given some formula and took a nap before being discharged but were given a $18,836 bill
Canadian man gets heart surgery in Florida and is billed over 600k USD
Some more pictures of people’s hospital bills

A public hospital’s ER is out-of-network with all private insurances, resulting in many patients being stuck with unreasonable bills and eventually resulting in a class action lawsuit over their billing practices


Annual healthcare spending in the US is estimated at 3.5 trillion, and billing prices are pretty much unfair and inconsistent, even for insured patients with legal loopholes and hospital discretion in setting prices
Billing announcements, and million dollar hospital bills on the rise
Top 35 Most Expensive Health Conditions in the US
Just… facility fees


Hospitals are more likely to tell you how much parking costs than how much a basic ECG test costs (meaning they probably inflate prices arbitrarily for patients… possibly on an individual basis)
Hospitals are magically able to “discount” hospital bills to less than a thousand dollars for patients that receive national attention in media (x, x)

People in the US are less likely to seek medical care because of high prices, even though 42% of doctors believe their patients are receiving too much health care (falsely)

corvussy: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse some great examples of us hospitals setting pretty exorbitant prices for health care:...

America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse
America, Android, and Doctor: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse

thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse

America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded SJPeace The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat We need Universal Healthcare! RETWEET THIS The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it. But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it. America, it's time to stop making excuses. 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android 1.9K Retweets 3.6K Likes The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand experience A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it down By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs of abating At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew had to go to the hospital I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't qualify for Taiwanese NHI) My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication. Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am now pretty much back to normal The bill for the ER visit? US$80.00 Eighty. American. Dollars Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance. At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan. And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that. This could have easily cost me hundreds or even thousands in the US without insurance. But here in Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital for relatively small amount of money. Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it America, it's time to stop making excuses. smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money
America, Android, and Bad: StanceGrounded
 SJPeace
 The horrors of Socialized Medicine: A
 first hand experience by Kevin Bozeat
 We need Universal Healthcare!
 RETWEET THIS
 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it.
 But for the rest of the night, I kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it.
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
 3:16 PM Feb 25, 2019 Twitter for Android
 1.9K Retweets
 3.6K Likes

 The Horrors of Socialized Medicine: A first hand
 experience
 A few days ago my stomach began to hurt. Thinking it
 would pass, I went home to try and rest for the night. A
 bit later I vomited. I thought that was the end of it
 But for the rest of the night, l kept vomiting almost every
 30-40 minutes. Even after my stomach was completely
 empty, I kept vomiting. Soon it was nothing but stomach
 fluid and bile. I tried to drink water to stay hydrated, but I
 kept throwing it up, no matter how hard I tried to keep it
 down
 By 3am I had severe stomach cramps, my body kept
 trying to vomit even though there was nothing left. I was
 dizzy and light-headed. My symptoms showed no signs
 of abating
 At this point I had to seek medical treatment, I knew
 had to go to the hospital
 I wanted to avoid it. I had no idea how different
 Taiwanese hospitals would be, whether I would be able
 to find an English speaking doctor, or what it would cost
 me (my US health insurance has lapsed and I don't
 qualify for Taiwanese NHI)

 My Taiwanese roommate called a taxi and took me to
 the ER at NTU Hospital. I was immediately checked-in by
 an English speaking nurse. Within 20 minutes I was given
 IV fluids and anti-emetics. They took blood tests and did
 an ultrasound to ensure it wasn't gall stones or
 appendicitis. From there I was given a diagnosis: a
 particularly severe case of Acute Viral Gastroenteritis
 (aka the stomach flu). After about 3 hours on an IV I
 began to feel slightly better, my nausea disappeared and
 my stomach began to calm down. I was discharged with
 a prescription for anti-emetics and pain medication.
 Each day since lve gotten progressively better and am
 now pretty much back to normal
 The bill for the ER visit?
 US$80.00
 Eighty. American. Dollars
 Out of pocket. Full cost. No discounts. No insurance.
 At one of the best hospitals in Taiwan.
 And if I had NHI, it would have been a fraction of that.
 This could have easily cost me hundreds or even
 thousands in the US without insurance. But here in
 Taiwan I was able to receive speedy, quality care
 comparable to what I would have gotten in a US hospital
 for relatively small amount of money.
 Given this experience, I no longer have a reason to fear
 or hesitate getting care in Taiwan should I ever need it
 America, it's time to stop making excuses.
smallest-feeblest-boggart:

thatpettyblackgirl:

the US has no excuse



I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they fixed me up good and quickly. I was shocked when my entire emergency visit didn’t cost me anything. In the U.S, an unexpected hospital visit can easily cost you MORE than a month’s rent. people literally lose their homes trying to pay medical bills that even a small fraction of our military budget could easily cover.the thing is, we have weapon industry lobbyists. we don’t have lobbyists or big money advocating for the average citizen. right now, money is more important than people and that needs to change

Same goes for Germany.Accessible Healthcare for everyone.The patient is more important than the money

smallest-feeblest-boggart: thatpettyblackgirl: the US has no excuse I had a similar experience in Hong Kong. I was in bad shape; they f...

Anaconda, Energy, and Food: t1 Gravitas Free Zone Retweeted db pooper @lonelydandruff 2h I just realised americans think their medicine costs as much as they're charged for it Your Trusted Wizard @Choplogik iguess if i was an american & saw all the wildly exorbitant medical bills people get i would wonder how universal healthcare'd get paid for 07 216 357 bogleech: the-library-alcove: flyingfishtailoutpost1: thebibliosphere: lizardtitties: withasmoothroundstone: robstmartin: titleknown: Blogging this tweet because this explains SO MUCH about the mindset of pretty much all the folks I’ve known who’re against single-payer, it’s not even funny… This…. This never occurred to me. Not once. That Americans are against Health Care because they think it actually costs tens of thousands of dollars for a broken arm, hundreds of thousands for a complicated birth, millions for cancer treatment. Because they’ve never known anything different. The idea that a broken arm is only a couple hundred bucks; a complicated birth a couple thousand; cancer treatment only tens of thousands; all easily covered by existing tax structures. This explains a lot.  And it’s a good example of what I was talking about in my post on scarcity being used to prop up ableism – always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.  Even if it seems obvious that it is, quite often that’s the result of careful manipulation and misconceptions that you’re not even aware of.   And never think you’re too smart to be fooled by that kind of thing, it doesn’t work like that.  Similarly, don’t think people who are fooled by something are stupid.  Nobody can have all the information about everything, and nobody has the time and energy to investigate and put together conscious conclusions about every piece of information they’re given.  It doesn’t take being stupid, or even just gullible, to believe something like this. I currently live in a country without free medical care and still, it’s enormously cheap compared to the USA. An American expat wrote a piece for our English language paper about how she paid more for parking at the hospital than giving birth to her baby that’s pretty interesting: https://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2016/01/06/healthcare-in-iceland-vs-the-us-weve-got-it-so-good/ Yesterday I had to go to the hospital cause I injured my eye, I’m frankly dreading what the bill is going to be, but what made me balk was being told in the pharmacy that my insurance was denied for the antibiotic eye drops and it’d be over $100 out of pocket. So I didn’t get my eyedrops. I’ve had these same drops before living in the UK. They cost me seven GBP. It’s the exact same drug, same steroid, same strain of antibiotic. But somehow the US gets away with charging $100 for a generic non brand version of a drug which is easy to create and widely used. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. You keep the poor poor by making sure basic necessities remain unattainable and then you make it seem like the norm so no one fights it. The rest of the world is not like this. Eat the rich. Resist. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. THIS. THISTHISTHIS. THIS IS WHAT I KEEP TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE. My blood pressure medication (Candesartan) costs between $40-$125 USD for 30 tablets in the US.Here in Germany, 98 tablets costs me 5 Euro. The worst part is, the people pocketing the most of this money are powerful enough to keep it this way, and in the event that legislation of some kind actually brought prices down, they could cry to the government that their profits were taken from them and lobby to “make up” their losses in some way that you can guarantee will still hurt the lower classes.Most likely, they would end up getting billions in corporate welfare, and when it came time to make any budget cuts, they’d be able to use the same influence to keep their handouts while welfare and food stamps for poorer, hungrier people end up on the chopping block first.
Anaconda, Energy, and Food: t1 Gravitas Free Zone Retweeted
 db pooper @lonelydandruff 2h
 I just realised americans think their medicine costs as much as they're
 charged for it
 Your Trusted Wizard @Choplogik
 iguess if i was an american & saw all the wildly exorbitant medical bills
 people get i would wonder how universal healthcare'd get paid for
 07
 216
 357
bogleech:
the-library-alcove:

flyingfishtailoutpost1:

thebibliosphere:

lizardtitties:

withasmoothroundstone:


robstmartin:

titleknown:
Blogging this tweet because this explains SO MUCH about the mindset of pretty much all the folks I’ve known who’re against single-payer, it’s not even funny…
This….
This never occurred to me. Not once. That Americans are against Health Care because they think it actually costs tens of thousands of dollars for a broken arm, hundreds of thousands for a complicated birth, millions for cancer treatment.
Because they’ve never known anything different. The idea that a broken arm is only a couple hundred bucks; a complicated birth a couple thousand; cancer treatment only tens of thousands; all easily covered by existing tax structures.

This explains a lot.  And it’s a good example of what I was talking about in my post on scarcity being used to prop up ableism – always question the idea that a resource is genuinely scarce.  Even if it seems obvious that it is, quite often that’s the result of careful manipulation and misconceptions that you’re not even aware of.  
And never think you’re too smart to be fooled by that kind of thing, it doesn’t work like that.  Similarly, don’t think people who are fooled by something are stupid.  Nobody can have all the information about everything, and nobody has the time and energy to investigate and put together conscious conclusions about every piece of information they’re given.  It doesn’t take being stupid, or even just gullible, to believe something like this.


I currently live in a country without free medical care and still, it’s enormously cheap compared to the USA. An American expat wrote a piece for our English language paper about how she paid more for parking at the hospital than giving birth to her baby that’s pretty interesting:
https://grapevine.is/mag/articles/2016/01/06/healthcare-in-iceland-vs-the-us-weve-got-it-so-good/

Yesterday I had to go to the hospital cause I injured my eye, I’m frankly dreading what the bill is going to be, but what made me balk was being told in the pharmacy that my insurance was denied for the antibiotic eye drops and it’d be over $100 out of pocket. So I didn’t get my eyedrops.

I’ve had these same drops before living in the UK. They cost me seven GBP.

It’s the exact same drug, same steroid, same strain of antibiotic. But somehow the US gets away with charging $100 for a generic non brand version of a drug which is easy to create and widely used. It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare. You keep the poor poor by making sure basic necessities remain unattainable and then you make it seem like the norm so no one fights it.

The rest of the world is not like this.

Eat the rich. Resist.
It’s downright robbery, but also a form of eugenics through poverty and class warfare.


THIS. THISTHISTHIS. THIS IS WHAT I KEEP TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE. 

My blood pressure medication (Candesartan) costs between $40-$125 USD for 30 tablets in the US.Here in Germany, 98 tablets costs me 5 Euro.

The worst part is, the people pocketing the most of this money are powerful enough to keep it this way, and in the event that legislation of some kind actually brought prices down, they could cry to the government that their profits were taken from them and lobby to “make up” their losses in some way that you can guarantee will still hurt the lower classes.Most likely, they would end up getting billions in corporate welfare, and when it came time to make any budget cuts, they’d be able to use the same influence to keep their handouts while welfare and food stamps for poorer, hungrier people end up on the chopping block first.

bogleech: the-library-alcove: flyingfishtailoutpost1: thebibliosphere: lizardtitties: withasmoothroundstone: robstmartin: titleknown:...

Alive, America, and Asian: did you know? Photographer Diana Kim, whose father abandoned her when she was 5, wanted to document the lives of the homeless. Searching for subjects on the streets, she came upon a thin and distant man in rags who looked somewhat familiar. It was her father. By fate or by chance, she'd found him after 25 years. PHOTO: DIANA KIM DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM did-you-kno: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing. Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them… … Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up. After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life. One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.” “I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.” “Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.” He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.” Source
Alive, America, and Asian: did you know?
 Photographer Diana Kim, whose
 father abandoned her when she
 was 5, wanted to document the
 lives of the homeless. Searching
 for subjects on the streets, she
 came upon a thin and distant man
 in rags who looked somewhat familiar.
 It was her father. By fate or by chance,
 she'd found him after 25 years.
 PHOTO: DIANA KIM
 DIDYOUKNOWBLOG.COM
did-you-kno:



He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, medication, food, or new clothing.


Eventually, he said to her: “Diana, I am so sorry for not being in your life. I am so happy that you have a family of your own now. Do better for them…
… Don’t worry about me or what everyone says about me. If you want to make me proud and happy, be there for your family the way your mom and I never were. Stop trying to save everyone…just worry about yourself and your family. And don’t forget why I named you Diana, you are the light within the darkness.” So she refused to give up.
After suffering a heart attack, he agreed to get help and slowly took control of his own life.
One day he suddenly called her to invite her out for coffee. Later that afternoon, she wrote on her blog: “I feel like I just met my father for the first time today.”
“I struggled to reconcile my feelings toward my father’s absence in my life, while continuing to care deeply for him and other homeless individuals.”
“Over time, I learned to navigate through my feelings of desperation and became more vocal in my community about my father’s condition and what it’s like to watch a loved one battle mental illness.”
He is now doing very well, and they are rebuilding their relationship from the ground up. “So long as we are alive in this world, every day is an opportunity to take hold of that ‘second chance.’ There is no failure unless you give up, and he never gave up. And I haven’t given up on him.”
Source

did-you-kno: He had schizophrenia. He didn’t recognize her. She did everything she could to connect with him, but he refused treatment, m...

Family, Girl, and Happy: Our sweet baby girl Cece came home last night after a week of Parvo treatment. She is so happy to be out of isolation and back with her family!
Family, Girl, and Happy: Our sweet baby girl Cece came home last night after a week of Parvo treatment. She is so happy to be out of isolation and back with her family!

Our sweet baby girl Cece came home last night after a week of Parvo treatment. She is so happy to be out of isolation and back with her fami...

Dieting, Girls, and Saw: Thigh gaps over foury clinicians i rolled out a cialist eatin Wellington clinicians i DHB area.I centred in treatment i erer to eat in put weight dmitted to hreatening It's the latest social-media beauty fad the thigh gap. A clear space between the top of the thighs has become a desirable goal for dieting teens who post and re-post pictures of thigh gaps on social-media platform Tumblr. Along with the postings of thin legs are a slew of others of girls photographing their own thighs, with such comments as "shoot me", "fat legs", or "tomorrow no eating". Clinicians ighing the nily bring ave a meal he parent:s ughter eat ow her to monoto- ' role is to oin in on is treated my, sepa- Clinical I order Serv detection a vice has pu school guid about 75 ar 90% of the are being e being refer education being rolle sees about In reality, acquiring thin upper thighs if you don't have them naturally is only possible by becoming malnourished, says Otago professor of anatomy Mark Stringer. nder the nost like "Only the malnourished or those with a slightly splayed pelvis will have a visible gap between their upper ch about Wilson, pa GPs who I delay refer says altho Disorder S get in, ref requiring describing case where to get her lignant on your is needs le etween eating a uses ts are Although there is a layer of subcuta- neous fat on the upper thighs, much of the reason the thighs are normally close together is because of the size- able abductor muscle that runs up the inner thigh. Only by extreme weight loss will this muscle waste away and the buttocks lose mass, thereby creating a gap for those who do not naturally have one. Nadine VW school gui educationn for more. its use of feedback. an urgent forms, an anger. sar fferers con- precluding: lionese: yogifindingpeace: recoverrunner:  Article I read recently. READ THE LAST PARAGRAPH! If you want a stupid thigh gap and don’t have a slightly splayed pelvis you have to get so malnourished that your body starts eating its own muscle. why on earth would you want that?! i seriously needed this article. I need to remember this in my mind, the reason i had one was because i was malnourished and now i am strong. Fuck thigh gaps man. I saw a post from a guy saying something like “i dont get thigh gaps, what am i meant to do with it? Stick my dick through it or something?” I know its not why girls do it but it actually made me laugh so hard. I use to want one but i really feel like curves are in work with what you have ladies this article makes me really happy
Dieting, Girls, and Saw: Thigh gaps
 over foury
 clinicians i
 rolled out a
 cialist eatin
 Wellington
 clinicians i
 DHB area.I
 centred in
 treatment i
 erer to eat in
 put weight
 dmitted to
 hreatening
 It's the latest social-media beauty fad
 the thigh gap. A clear space between
 the top of the thighs has become a
 desirable goal for dieting teens who
 post and re-post pictures of thigh
 gaps on social-media platform Tumblr.
 Along with the postings of thin legs are
 a slew of others of girls photographing
 their own thighs, with such comments
 as "shoot me", "fat legs", or "tomorrow
 no eating".
 Clinicians
 ighing the
 nily bring
 ave a meal
 he parent:s
 ughter eat
 ow her to
 monoto-
 ' role is to
 oin in on
 is treated
 my, sepa-
 Clinical I
 order Serv
 detection a
 vice has pu
 school guid
 about 75 ar
 90% of the
 are being e
 being refer
 education
 being rolle
 sees about
 In reality, acquiring thin upper thighs
 if you don't have them naturally is only
 possible by becoming malnourished,
 says Otago professor of anatomy Mark
 Stringer.
 nder the
 nost like
 "Only the malnourished or those
 with a slightly splayed pelvis will have
 a visible gap between their upper
 ch about
 Wilson, pa
 GPs who I
 delay refer
 says altho
 Disorder S
 get in, ref
 requiring
 describing
 case where
 to get her
 lignant
 on your
 is needs
 le
 etween
 eating
 a uses
 ts are
 Although there is a layer of subcuta-
 neous fat on the upper thighs, much
 of the reason the thighs are normally
 close together is because of the size-
 able abductor muscle that runs up the
 inner thigh. Only by extreme weight
 loss will this muscle waste away and the
 buttocks lose mass, thereby creating
 a gap for those who do not naturally
 have one.
 Nadine VW
 school gui
 educationn
 for more.
 its use of
 feedback.
 an urgent
 forms, an
 anger.
 sar
 fferers
 con-
precluding:
lionese:


yogifindingpeace:

recoverrunner:

 Article I read recently. READ THE LAST PARAGRAPH! If you want a stupid thigh gap and don’t have a slightly splayed pelvis you have to get so malnourished that your body starts eating its own muscle. why on earth would you want that?!

i seriously needed this article. I need to remember this in my mind, the reason i had one was because i was malnourished and now i am strong. Fuck thigh gaps man.


I saw a post from a guy saying something like “i dont get thigh gaps, what am i meant to do with it? Stick my dick through it or something?” I know its not why girls do it but it actually made me laugh so hard. I use to want one but i really feel like curves are in work with what you have ladies


this article makes me really happy

precluding: lionese: yogifindingpeace: recoverrunner:  Article I read recently. READ THE LAST PARAGRAPH! If you want a stupid thigh gap ...